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Author PENG, Y., ZHANG, H., GUO, K., DING, Y., WANG, X.
Title The Safe Distance Between Road Lighting Fixtures and Street Trees. Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Landscape Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 2 Pages (down) 41-43
Keywords Plants; Planning
Abstract The road lighting system and the road greening system, which are mutually interrelated and independent, are two important parts in the urban road environment Unreasonable road lighting is easy to induce light pollution and has a great negative impact on the physiology and growth of garden plants in the urban green space. In this paper; 21 kinds of common tree species in the urban green space of Zhengzhou were selected as the research object, and the photosynthetic physiological parameters of landscape trees under the TKD light source were observed using LI-6400 Photosynthesis System. This paper attempted to find the critical point for initiating photosynthesis of different types of tree species under a certain light source and then calculated the safe distance between lighting fixtures and landscape trees. The results showed that road lighting interfered with the photosynthetic physiological activities of the surveyed trees, affecting the normal dormancy of the plants at night; the sensitivity of different tree species to night lighting was different, and there were some differences in the light compensation points, so the corresponding safe distance was also different It is hoped that this study can provide a valuable reference and scientific basis for urban toad greening and lighting design.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2648
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Author Borges, R.M.
Title Dark Matters: Challenges of Nocturnal Communication Between Plants and Animals in Delivery of Pollination Services Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal
Volume 91 Issue 1 Pages (down) 33-42
Keywords Plants; Animals
Abstract The night is a special niche characterized by dim light, lower temperatures, and higher humidity compared to the day. Several animals have made the transition from the day into the night and have acquired unique adaptations to cope with the challenges of performing nocturnal activities. Several plant species have opted to bloom at night, possibly as a response to aridity to prevent excessive water loss through evapotranspiration since flowering is often a water-demanding process, or to protect pollen from heat stress. Nocturnal pollinators have visual adaptations to function under dim light conditions but may also trade off vision against olfaction when they are dependent on nectar-rewarding and scented flowers. Nocturnal pollinators may use CO2 and humidity cues emanating from freshly-opened flowers as indicators of nectar-rich resources. Some endothermic nocturnal insect pollinators are attracted to thermogenic flowers within which they remain to obtain heat as a reward to increase their energy budget. This review focuses on mechanisms that pollinators use to find flowers at night, and the signals that nocturnally blooming flowers may employ to attract pollinators under dim light conditions. It also indicates gaps in our knowledge. While millions of years of evolutionary time have given pollinators and plants solutions to the delivery of pollination services and to the offering of appropriate rewards, this history of successful evolution is being threatened by artificial light at night. Excessive and inappropriate illumination associated with anthropogenic activities has resulted in significant light pollution which serves to undermine life processes governed by dim light.
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1832
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Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B.
Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages (down) 24
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.
Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France
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ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817
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Author Kirschey, T.; Meisel, J.
Title Augen in der Landschaft Seen und Stillgewässer Nordostdeutschlands. Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Naturmagazin Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 4-11
Keywords Plants
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 661
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Author Schroer, S.; Hölker, F.
Title Impact of Lighting on Flora and Fauna Type Book Chapter
Year 2016 Publication Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 1-33
Keywords Ecology; Lighting; Artificial light at night; ALAN; Plants; Animals; review
Abstract Technology, especially artificial light at night (ALAN), often has unexpected impacts on the environment. This chapter addresses both the perception of light by various organisms and the impact of ALAN on flora and fauna. The responses to ALAN are subdivided into the effects of light intensity, color spectra, and duration and timing of illumination. The ways organisms perceive light can be as variable as the habitats they live in. ALAN often interferes with natural light information. It is rarely neutral and has significant impacts beyond human perception. For example, UV light reflection of generative plant parts or the direction of light is used by many organisms as information for foraging, finding spawning sites, or communication. Contemporary outdoor lighting often lacks sustainable planning, even though the protection of species, habitat, and human well-being could be improved by adopting simple technical measures. The increasing use of ALAN with high intensities in the blue part of the spectrum, e.g., fluorescent light and LEDs, is discussed as a critical trend. Blue light is a major circadian signal in higher vertebrates and can substantially impact the orientation of organisms such as numerous insect species. A better understanding of how various types and sources of artificial light, and how organisms perceive ALAN, will be an important step towards more sustainable lighting. Such knowledge is the basis for sustainable lighting planning and the development of solutions to protect biodiversity from the effects of outdoor lighting. Maps that describe the rapid changes in ALAN are urgently needed. In addition, measures are required to reduce the increasing use and intensity of ALAN in more remote areas as signaling thresholds in flora and fauna at night are often close to moonlight intensity and far below streetlight levels.
Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany; schroer(at)igb-berlin.de
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Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-00295-8 Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1470
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