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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Cascading effects of artificial light at night: resource-mediated control of herbivores in a grassland ecosystem Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 2015 Issue Pages (down) 20140131
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; photopollution; artificial light at night; biotic interactions; community-level; bottom-up effects; grasslands; herbivores; invertebrates; pea aphid; Acyrthosiphon pisum; plants; insects
Abstract Artificial light at night has a wide range of biological effects on both plants and animals. Here, we review mechanisms by which artificial light at night may restructure ecological communities by modifying the interactions between species. Such mechanisms may be top-down (predator, parasite or grazer controlled), bottom-up (resource-controlled) or involve non-trophic processes, such as pollination, seed dispersal or competition. We present results from an experiment investigating both top-down and bottom-up effects of artificial light at night on the population density of pea aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum in a diverse artificial grassland community in the presence and absence of predators and under low-level light of different spectral composition. We found no evidence for top-down control of A. pisum in this system, but did find evidence for bottom-up effects mediated through the impact of light on flower head density in a leguminous food plant. These results suggest that physiological effects of light on a plant species within a diverse plant community can have detectable demographic effects on a specialist herbivore.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9FE, UK; k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1128
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Author Rydin, C; Bolinder, K
Title Moonlight pollination in the gymnosperm Ephedra (Gnetales) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol. Lett.
Volume 11 Issue 4 Pages (down) 20140993
Keywords Plants; anemophily; entomophily; lunar phases; nocturnal insects; lunar cycle; light at night; Ephedra; Ephedra distachya; pollination
Abstract Most gymnosperms are wind-pollinated, but some are insect-pollinated, and in Ephedra (Gnetales), both wind pollination and insect pollination occur. Little is, however, known about mechanisms and evolution of pollination syndromes in gymnosperms. Based on four seasons of field studies, we show an unexpected correlation between pollination and the phases of the moon in one of our studied species, Ephedra foeminea. It is pollinated by dipterans and lepidopterans, most of them nocturnal, and its pollination coincides with the full moon of July. This may be adaptive in two ways. Many nocturnal insects navigate using the moon. Further, the spectacular reflection of the full-moonlight in the pollination drops is the only apparent means of nocturnal attraction of insects in these plants. In the sympatric but wind-pollinated Ephedra distachya, pollination is not correlated to the full moon but occurs at approximately the same dates every year. The lunar correlation has probably been lost in most species of Ephedra subsequent an evolutionary shift to wind pollination in the clade. When the services of insects are no longer needed for successful pollination, the adaptive value of correlating pollination with the full moon is lost, and conceivably also the trait.
Address Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm 106 91, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1143
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Author Jawaad Atif, M.; Amin, B.; Imran Ghani, M.; Ali, M.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Cheng, Z.
Title Allium sativum L. (Garlic) bulb enlargement as influenced by differential combinations of photoperiod and temperature Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Food Chemistry Abbreviated Journal Food Chemistry
Volume in press Issue Pages (down) 127991
Keywords Plants
Abstract Photoperiod and temperature are vital environmental factors that regulate plant developmental processes. However, the roles of these factors in garlic bulb enlargement are unclear. In this report, responses of garlic bulb morphology and physiology to combinations of photoperiod (light/dark: 10/14 h, 12/12 h, 14/10 h) and temperature (light/dark: 25/18°C, 30/20°C) were investigated. For garlic cultivar G103, bulb characteristics, phytohormones (IAA, ABA, ZT, tZR, JA), allicin and phenolic acids (p-coumaric and p-hydroxybenzoic) were highest under a photoperiod of 14 h at 30°C. Maximum GA was observed under 14 h+30°C for cv. G2011-5. Maximum caffeic, ferulic and vanillic acids were detected for cv. G2011-5 at 14 h+30°C, 12 h+25°C and 14 h+25°C, respectively. Flavonoids (myricetin, quercetin, kaempferol and apigenin) were not detected in this trial. This is the first report describing the impact of long periods of light duration and higher temperatures on garlic morphology, phytohormones, phenolic acids and allicin content.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0308-8146 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3137
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Author Ardavani, O.; Zerefos, S.; Doulos, L.T.
Title Redesigning the exterior lighting as part of the urban landscape: The role of transgenic bioluminescent plants in mediterranean urban and suburban lighting environments Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume 242 Issue Pages (down) 118477
Keywords Plants; Lighting
Abstract This research discusses the feasibility of replacing or supporting artificial lighting with Transgenic Bioluminescent Plants (TBP), as a means of minimizing light pollution, reducing electrical energy consumption and de-carbonizing urban and suburban outdoor environments, creating sustainable conditions and enriching the quality of life. Until now, no information is given about the light output of any TBPs and the question “Are the TBPs capable of producing the necessary lighting levels for exterior lighting?” is unanswered. For this reason, a new methodology is proposed for selecting and analyzing the lighting output potential of transgenic plants ted for specific climatic conditions. This methodology considers growth and reduction factors, as well as a formulae for estimating the plants’ luminous output by performing light measurements. Results show that transgenic plants in medium growth can emit a median luminous flux of up to 57 lm, a value that can definitely support low lighting requirements when used in large numbers of plants. From the lighting measurements and calculations performed in this research, the light output of the TBPs for a typical road with 5m width was found equal to 2lx. The amount of plants required was 40 at each side of the road for every 30m of streets with P6 road class. The results show that the use of bioluminescent plants can actually contribute to the reduction of energy consumption, concerning only the lighting criterium, thus creating an enormous opportunity for a new state-of- the-art market and research that could potentially minimize CO2 emissions and light pollution, improve urban and suburban microclimate, mitigate the effects of climate change, as well as provide an alternative means of lighting affecting both outdoor lighting design and landscape planning in suburban and urban settings. Moreover, further research should be applied considering also other possible ecological impacts before applying TBPs for exterior lighting applications.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2711
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Author Shimomura, M.; Yoshida, H.; Fujiuchi, N.; Ariizumi, T.; Ezura, H.; Fukuda, N.
Title Continuous blue lighting and elevated carbon dioxide concentration rapidly increase chlorogenic acid content in young lettuce plants Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae
Volume 272 Issue Pages (down) 109550
Keywords Plants
Abstract Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a strong antioxidant that potentially reduces oxidative damage in human cells. In this study, the effects of environmental factors such as photoperiod, light quality and intensity, and CO2 concentration on the growth and CGA content of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were evaluated. CGA content in fresh lettuce increased under high light intensity treatments, doubling in concentration under 200 μmol m−2 s-1 compared to 100 μmol m−2 s-1. Elevated CO2 concentration also increased CGA content in fresh lettuce, quadrupling in concentration when grown at 1000 ppm compared to 400 ppm. Furthermore, there was a compound effect of light intensity and CO2 concentration whereby a light intensity level of 200 μmol m−2 s-1 and CO2 of 1000 ppm produced an even higher concentration of CGA, 199 mg per 100 g of fresh lettuce. Increased CGA concentration because of continuous lighting and elevated CO2 was observed under both fluorescent light and blue LED, but not under red LED treatment. Increased day length also induced higher CGA content in lettuce plants. These results show that continuous lighting, including blue spectrum and elevated CO2 concentration can cause higher CGA accumulation in lettuce plants. The observed increase in CGA content was induced only for 2 days after treatment was initiated. One possible interpretation of the data is that physiological stress caused by excess photosynthesis under continuous lighting results in higher CGA content to protect the plant body from high levels of reactive oxidative species. In addition, blue light and CO2 could be stimulus signals for inducing high CGA accumulation via metabolite changes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3090
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