|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Myers, L.; Christian, K.; Kirchner, R.
Title Flowering responses of 48 lines of oilseed rape (Brassica spp.) to vernalization and daylength Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Australian Journal of Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal Aust. J. Agric. Res.
Volume 33 Issue 6 Pages (down) 927
Keywords Plants
Abstract Forty-eight lines of Brassica spp, of diverse origins were grown in the glasshouse either under natural daylengths or daylengths extended to 16 h by artificial illumination. Plants were either unvernalized or had been subjected to 6 weeks at 8¦C day and 6¦C night temperatures as seedlings. Lines could be classified into two major groups, according to whether or not vernalization or long photoperiods were essential for 50% flowering within 21 weeks. In six lines, both vernalization and long days were essential for prompt flowering, while only five lines did not respond to either treatment. Strong interactions between lines and treatments were found in the number of leaves and subtended buds at flowering. The results show that a wide range of responses is obtainable from material currently available, offering considerabk, scope for adaptation to different environments.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0004-9409 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2369
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Davies, T.W.; Smyth, T.
Title Why artificial light at night should be a focus for global change research in the 21st century Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 24 Issue 3 Pages (down) 872-882
Keywords Commentary; Animals; Plants
Abstract The environmental impacts of artificial light at night have been a rapidly growing field of global change science in recent years. Yet, light pollution has not achieved parity with other global change phenomena in the level of concern and interest it receives from the scientific community, government and nongovernmental organizations. This is despite the globally widespread, expanding and changing nature of night-time lighting and the immediacy, severity and phylogenetic breath of its impacts. In this opinion piece, we evidence 10 reasons why artificial light at night should be a focus for global change research in the 21st century. Our reasons extend beyond those concerned principally with the environment, to also include impacts on human health, culture and biodiversity conservation more generally. We conclude that the growing use of night-time lighting will continue to raise numerous ecological, human health and cultural issues, but that opportunities exist to mitigate its impacts by combining novel technologies with sound scientific evidence. The potential gains from appropriate management extend far beyond those for the environment, indeed it may play a key role in transitioning towards a more sustainable society.
Address Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Plymouth, Devon, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29124824 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2054
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grenis, K.; Murphy, S.M.
Title Direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Insect Sci
Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages (down) 770-776
Keywords Animals; Plants
Abstract Light pollution is a global disturbance with resounding impacts on a wide variety of organisms, but our understanding of these impacts is restricted to relatively few higher vertebrate species. We tested the direct effects of light pollution on herbivore performance as well as indirect effects mediated by host plant quality. We found that artificial light from streetlights alters plant toughness. Additionally, we found evidence of both direct and indirect effects of light pollution on the performance of an herbivorous insect, which indicates that streetlights can have cascading impacts on multiple trophic levels. Our novel findings suggest that light pollution can alter plant-insect interactions and thus may have important community-wide consequences.
Address Department of Biological Sciences, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1672-9609 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29425403 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1865
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lawrence, B.K.; Fehr, W.R.
Title Reproductive Response of Soybeans to Night Interruption1 Type Journal Article
Year 1981 Publication Crop Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages (down) 755
Keywords Plants
Abstract Artificial lights may be used to delay flowering of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. Previous research has suggested that night interruption imposed every other night would delay flowering as much as every-night interruption. Our objective was to evaluate the reproductive development of cultivars when exposed to night interruption every night compared with exposure every other night. One cultivar of each Maturity Group 00 through V was grown in the field at Ames, Iowa during 1978 and 1979. The four light treatments imposed every night or every other night included illumination with incandescent light from sunset to sunrise, 2300 to 0030 hours, 0030 to 0200 hours, or 0200 to 0330 hours. Control plots were not exposed to artificial light.

The average number of days that reproductive development was delayed beyond the control was twice as great for the every-night treatments as for the every-other-night treatments. Illumination from sunset to sunrise delayed reproductive development significantly more than the treatments of night interruption for 1.5 hours. Night interruption near the end of the dark period (0200 to 0330 hours) delayed reproductive development more than the earlier interruptions.

The results did not support the hypothesis that light treatments every other night would delay reproductive development as much as every-night interruptions. The lighting regime needed to delay reproductive development will depend on the photoperiod requirements of the cultivars and duration of the delay that is desired.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0011-183X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2367
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Woolsey, S.; Capelli, F.; Gonser, T.; Hoehn, E.; Hostmann, M.; Junker, B.; Paetzold, A.; Roulier, C.; Schweizer, S.; Tiegs, S.D.; Tockner, K.; Weber, C.; Peter, A.
Title A strategy to assess river restoration success Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshwater Biol
Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages (down) 752-769
Keywords Plants; evaluation guidelines; socio-economics; indicators; floodplain; decision making; bioassessment; sustainability; biodiversity
Abstract 1. Elaborate restoration attempts are underway worldwide to return human-impacted rivers to more natural conditions. Assessing the outcome of river restoration projects is vital for adaptive management, evaluating project efficiency, optimising future programmes and gaining public acceptance. An important reason why assessment is often omitted is lack of appropriate guidelines.

2. Here we present guidelines for assessing river restoration success. They are based on a total of 49 indicators and 13 specific objectives elaborated for the restoration of low- to mid-order rivers in Switzerland. Most of these objectives relate to ecological attributes of rivers, but socio-economic aspects are also considered.

3. A strategy is proposed according to which a set of indicators is selected from the total of 49 indicators to ensure that indicators match restoration objectives and measures, and that the required effort for survey and analysis of indicators is appropriate to the project budget.

4. Indicator values are determined according to methods described in detailed method sheets. Restoration success is evaluated by comparing indicator values before and after restoration measures have been undertaken. To this end, values are first standardised on a dimensionless scale ranging from 0 to 1, then averaged across different indicators for a given project objective, and finally assigned to one of five overall success categories.

5. To illustrate the application of this scheme, a case study on the Thur River, Switzerland, is presented. Seven indicators were selected to meet a total of five project objectives. The project was successful in achieving ‘provision of high recreational value’, ‘lateral connectivity’ and ‘vertical connectivity’ but failed to meet the objectives ‘morphological and hydraulic variability’ and ‘near natural abundance and diversity of fauna’. Results from this assessment allowed us to identify potential deficits and gaps in the restoration project. To gain information on the sensitivity of the assessment scheme would require a set of complementary indicators for each restoration objective.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 662
Permanent link to this record