toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Elkins, C.; Van Iersel, M. W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Supplemental Far-red Light-emitting Diode Light Increases Growth of Foxglove Seedlings Under Sole-source Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication HortTechnology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages (down) 564-569  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Seedlings may be grown indoors where environmental conditions can be precisely controlled to ensure consistent and reliable production. The optimal spectrum for production under sole-source lighting is currently unknown. Far-red light (λ = 700–800 nm) typically is not a significant part of the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED) grow lights. However, far-red light is photosynthetically active and can enhance leaf elongation, which may result in larger leaves and increased light interception. We hypothesized that adding far-red light to sole-source lighting would increase the growth of ‘Dalmatian Peach’ foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) seedlings grown under white LED lights, potentially shortening production times. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of far-red light intensities, ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1, on the growth and morphology of foxglove seedlings. Foxglove seedlings were grown in a growth chamber with a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 186 ± 6.4 μmol·m−2·s−1 and supplemental far-red light intensities ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1. As far-red light increased, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, plant height, and plant height/number of leaves increased by 38% (P = 0.004), 20% (P = 0.029), 38% (P = 0.025), and 34% (P = 0.024), respectively, while root weight fraction decreased 16% (P = 0.034). Although we expected supplemental far-red light to induce leaf and/or stem expansion, specific leaf area and compactness (two measures of morphology) were unaffected. Because a 37% increase in total photon flux density (PPFD plus far-red light) resulted in a 34.5% increase in total plant dry weight, the increased growth likely was due to increased photosynthesis rather than a shade-acclimation response. The growth response was linear across the 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1 range of far-fed light tested, so we were unable to determine a saturating far-red photon flux density.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3266  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Son, K.-H.; Jeon, Y.-M.; Oh, M.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Application of supplementary white and pulsed light-emitting diodes to lettuce grown in a plant factory with artificial lighting Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.  
  Volume 57 Issue 6 Pages (down) 560-572  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are currently undergoing rapid development as plant growth light sources in a plant factory with artificial lighting (PFAL). However, little is known about the effects of supplementary light and pulsed LEDs on plant growth, bioactive compound productions, and energy efficiency in lettuce. In this study, we aimed to determine the effects of supplementary white LEDs (study I) and pulsed LEDs (study II) on red leaf lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. ‘Sunmang’). In study I, six LED sources were used to determine the effects of supplementary white LEDs (RGB 7:1:1, 7:1:2, RWB 7:1:2, 7:2:1, 8:1:1, 8:2:0 [based on chip number] on lettuce). Fluorescent lamps were used as the control. In study II, pulsed RWB 7:2:1 LED treatments (30, 10, 1 kHz with a 50 or 75% duty ratio) were applied to lettuce. In study I, the application of red and blue fractions improved plant growth characteristics and the accumulation of antioxidant phenolic compounds, respectively. In addition, the application of green light increased plant growth, including the fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots, as well as leaf area. However, the substitution of green LEDs with white LEDs induced approximately 3.4-times higher light and energy use efficiency. In study II, the growth characteristics and photosynthesis of lettuce were affected by various combinations of duty ratio and frequency. In particular, biomass under a 1 kHz 75% duty ratio of pulsed LEDs was not significantly different from that of the control (continuous LEDs). Moreover, no significant difference in leaf photosynthetic rate was observed between any pulsed LED treatment utilizing a 75% duty ratio versus continuous LEDs. However, some pulsed LED treatments may potentially improve light and energy use efficiency compared to continuous LEDs. These results suggest that the fraction of red, blue, and green wavelengths of LEDs is an important factor for plant growth and the biosynthesis of bioactive compounds in lettuce and that supplementary white LEDs (based on a combination of red and blue LEDs) might be more suitable as a commercial lighting source than green LEDs. In addition, the use of suitable pulses of LEDs might save energy while inducing plant growth similar to that under continuous LEDs. Our findings provide important basic information for designing optimal light sources for use in a PFAL.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1615  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kim, Y.J.; Kim, H.M.; Kim, H.M.; Jeong, B.R.; Lee, H.-J.; Kim, H.-J.; Hwang, S.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ice plant growth and phytochemical concentrations are affected by light quality and intensity of monochromatic light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.  
  Volume 59 Issue 4 Pages (down) 529-536  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract The ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.), widely known to be an effective cure for diabetes mellitus, is also a functional crop. This study was conducted to examine the effects of light quality and intensity of monochromatic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on ice plant growth and phytochemical concentrations in a closed-type plant production system. Ice plant seedlings were transplanted into a deep floating technique system with a recycling nutrient solution (EC 4.0 dS m−1, pH 6.5). Fluorescent lamps, as well as monochromatic red (660 nm) and blue (450 nm) LEDs, were used at 120 ± 5 or 150 ± 5 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD with a photoperiod of 14 h/10 h (light/dark) for 4 weeks. Ice plants showed higher growth under the high light intensity treatment, especially under the red LEDs. Furthermore, the SPAD value and photosynthetic rate were higher under the red LEDs with 150 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD. The ice plant phytochemical composition, such as antioxidant activity and myo-inositol and pinitol concentrations, were highest under the blue LEDs with 150 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD. Total phenolic concentration was highest under the blue LEDs with 120 µmol m−2 s−1 PPFD. Despite a slightly different dependence on light intensity, phytochemical concentrations responded positively to the blue LED treatments, as compared to other treatments. In conclusion, this study suggests that red LEDs enhance ice plant biomass, while blue LEDs induce phytochemical  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1983  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title Duration of Light and Growth Type Journal Article
  Year 1924 Publication Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 38 Issue 151 Pages (down) 509-523  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2391  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Pattison, P.M.; Tsao, J.Y.; Brainard, G.C.; Bugbee, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title LEDs for photons, physiology and food Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 563 Issue 7732 Pages (down) 493-500  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Plants; Review  
  Abstract Lighting based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) not only is more energy efficient than traditional lighting, but also enables improved performance and control. The colour, intensity and distribution of light can now be controlled with unprecedented precision, enabling light to be used both as a signal for specific physiological responses in humans and plants, and as an efficient fuel for fresh food production. Here we show how a broad and improved understanding of the physiological responses to light will facilitate greater energy savings and provide health and productivity benefits that have not previously been associated with lighting.  
  Address Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30464269 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2110  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: