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Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol  
  Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 24  
  Keywords Moonlight; Plants  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.  
  Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN (up) 1471-2229 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817  
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Author Lumsden, P. J., & Furuya, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Evidence for Two Actions of Light in the Photoperiodic Induction of Flowering in <italic>Pharbitis nil</italic> Type Journal Article
  Year 1986 Publication Plant and Cell Physiology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Using one-day-old light-grown seedlings of Pharbitis nil we have shown that there are two distinct responses to light during the inductive dark period. The first is the classic night-break, which inhibits flowering at a specific stage of the circadian rhythm (assumed to be the basis of dark time measurement). The second action is to control the phase of this rhythm. The two responses were compared at the 6th and 8th hour of darkness. They differed in their dose responses, and by using very short exposures it was possible to achieve one response without the other. The response of the rhythm to light displayed characteristics of other circadian rhythms; the direction and sensitivity of the phase shift changed between the 6th and 8th h, the rhythm was reset by longer exposures to light, and with one critical light treatment at the appropriate phase, the rhythm was apparently abolished. These results offer direct support for an external coincidence model in the photoperiodic control of floral induction.  
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  ISSN (up) 1471-9053 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2375  
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Author Pocock, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Advanced lighting technology in controlled environment agriculture Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 83-94  
  Keywords Plants; Lighting  
  Abstract There is a recent awareness of the importance of plants in our everyday lives. Light is a requirement for plants and serves two important roles. It provides energy for growth and provides information that elicits plant responses including, among others, plant shape, pigmentation, nutritional content and resistance to stress. Light is paradoxical to plants, it is a requirement however, in excess it is damaging. Plants sense and interpret light through many families of photoreceptors and through the energy state of the photosynthetic apparatus. Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are quickly replacing traditional light sources for human applications, and currently there is effort being put into tailoring these technology platforms for the plant community. Potential plant sensing pathways and the spectral effects on pigmentation and photochemistry in red lettuce are described.  
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  ISSN (up) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1383  
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Author Chaves, I.; Pokorny, R.; Byrdin, M.; Hoang, N.; Ritz, T.; Brettel, K.; Essen, L.-O.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Batschauer, A.; Ahmad, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The cryptochromes: blue light photoreceptors in plants and animals Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Annual Review of Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Plant Biol  
  Volume 62 Issue Pages 335-364  
  Keywords Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism; Animals; Cryptochromes/chemistry/classification/*physiology; DNA Repair; Deoxyribodipyrimidine Photo-Lyase/chemistry/classification/physiology; Homing Behavior; Insects/physiology; *Light Signal Transduction; Magnetics; Mice; Oxidation-Reduction; Phosphorylation/physiology; Plants/*metabolism; blue light  
  Abstract Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, where they play key roles in growth and development. Subsequently identified in prokaryotes, archaea, and many eukaryotes, cryptochromes function in the animal circadian clock and are proposed as magnetoreceptors in migratory birds. Cryptochromes are closely structurally related to photolyases, evolutionarily ancient flavoproteins that catalyze light-dependent DNA repair. Here, we review the structural, photochemical, and molecular properties of cry-DASH, plant, and animal cryptochromes in relation to biological signaling mechanisms and uncover common features that may contribute to better understanding the function of cryptochromes in diverse systems including in man.  
  Address Department of Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. i.chaves@erasmusmc.nl  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN (up) 1543-5008 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:21526969 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 341  
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Author Gaston, K.J.; Davies, T.W.; Nedelec, S.L.; Holt, L.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impacts of Artificial Light at Night on Biological Timings Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Abbreviated Journal Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst.  
  Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 49-68  
  Keywords Animals; Plants; Review  
  Abstract The use of artificial lighting to illuminate the night has provided substantial benefits to humankind. It has also disrupted natural daily, seasonal, and lunar light cycles as experienced by a diversity of organisms, and hence it has also altered cues for the timings of many biological activities. Here we review the evidence for impacts of artificial nighttime lighting on these timings. Although the examples are scattered, concerning a wide variety of species and environments, the breadth of such impacts is compelling. Indeed, it seems reasonable to conclude that the vast majority of impacts of artificial nighttime lighting stem from effects on biological timings. This adds support to arguments that artificial nighttime lighting has a quite pervasive and marked impact on ecological systems, that the rapid expansion in the global extent of both direct illuminance and skyglow is thus of significant concern, and that a widespread implementation of mitigation measures is required.  
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  ISSN (up) 1543-592X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2449  
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