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Author Liu, Z.; Lv, Y.; Ding, R.; Chen, X.; Pu, G.
Title Light Pollution Changes the Toxicological Effects of Cadmium on Microbial Community Structure and Function Associated with Leaf Litter Decomposition Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Molecular Sciences Abbreviated Journal Int J Mol Sci
Volume 21 Issue (up) 2 Pages
Keywords Plants; Illumina Sequencing; artificial light at night; cadmium pollution; extracellular enzyme activities; litter decomposition; microbial biodiversity
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN/A) can not only alter the behavior and communication of biological organisms, it can also interact with other stressors. Despite its widespread use and the numerous potential ecological effects, little is known about the impact of ALAN on plant litter decomposition under cadmium (Cd) pollution in aquatic ecosystems. In an indoor microcosm experiment, we tested single and combined effects of ALAN and Cd on the activities and community structure of fungi associated with plant litter. The results showed that ALAN and/or Cd can change both water and leaf litter characteristics. ALAN exposure not only altered fungal community structure and their correlations, but also increased the activities of alkaline phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, and cellobiohydrolase. The leaf litter decomposition rate was 71% higher in the A-Cd treatment than that in the N-Cd treatment, indicating that the presence of ALAN weakened the negative impact of Cd on leaf litter decomposition. These results suggested that ALAN exposure mitigated the negative effect of Cd on leaf litter decomposition, contributing to the duel effect of ALAN on leaf litter decomposition. Overall, the results expand our understanding of ALAN on the environment and highlight the contribution of ALAN to Cd toxicity in aquatic ecosystems.
Address Guangxi Key Laboratory of Plant Conservation and Restoration Ecology in Karst Terrain, Guangxi Institute of Botany, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guilin 541006, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1422-0067 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31936535 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2818
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Author Buschmann, C.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.
Title Principles and characteristics of multi-colour fluorescence imaging of plants Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plant Physiology
Volume 152 Issue (up) 2-3 Pages 297-314
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0176-1617 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 652
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Author Siemens, C.W.
Title III. On the influence of electric light upon vegetation, and on certain physical principles involved Type Journal Article
Year 1880 Publication Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Abbreviated Journal Abstr. Pap. Printed Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond.
Volume 30 Issue (up) 200-205 Pages 210-219
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0370-1662 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2376
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Author Vänninen, I.; Pinto, D.M.; Nissinen, A.I.; Johansen, N.S.; Shipp, L.
Title In the light of new greenhouse technologies: 1. Plant-mediated effects of artificial lighting on arthropods and tritrophic interactions Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Annals of Applied Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 157 Issue (up) 3 Pages 393-414
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-4746 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 658
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review: Moth pollination and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol
Volume 40 Issue (up) 3 Pages 187–198
Keywords Ecology; Agro-ecosystems; artificial night lighting; ecological networks; ecosystem services; flowering plants; food-webs; moths; population declines; plants; insects; pollination
Abstract 1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world.

2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted.

3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate.

4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested.
Address School of Biological, Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, U.K.
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1084
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