|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 10 Issue (up) 1 Pages e02550
Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Gaston, K.J.; Davies, T.W.; Nedelec, S.L.; Holt, L.A.
Title Impacts of Artificial Light at Night on Biological Timings Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics Abbreviated Journal Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst.
Volume 48 Issue (up) 1 Pages 49-68
Keywords Animals; Plants; Review
Abstract The use of artificial lighting to illuminate the night has provided substantial benefits to humankind. It has also disrupted natural daily, seasonal, and lunar light cycles as experienced by a diversity of organisms, and hence it has also altered cues for the timings of many biological activities. Here we review the evidence for impacts of artificial nighttime lighting on these timings. Although the examples are scattered, concerning a wide variety of species and environments, the breadth of such impacts is compelling. Indeed, it seems reasonable to conclude that the vast majority of impacts of artificial nighttime lighting stem from effects on biological timings. This adds support to arguments that artificial nighttime lighting has a quite pervasive and marked impact on ecological systems, that the rapid expansion in the global extent of both direct illuminance and skyglow is thus of significant concern, and that a widespread implementation of mitigation measures is required.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1543-592X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2449
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ebisawa, M.; Shoji, K.; Kato, M.; Shimomura, K.; Goto, F.; Yoshihara, T.
Title Supplementary Ultraviolet Radiation B Together with Blue Light at Night Increased Quercetin Content and Flavonol Synthase Gene Expression in Leaf Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal Environ. Control Biol.
Volume 46 Issue (up) 1 Pages 1-11
Keywords Plants
Abstract Establishment of an effective supplementary lighting procedure is necessary to increase the value of leaf lettuce grown using a hydroponic method involving a low production cost. In leaf lettuce extracts, quercetin, one of the flavonoids, was isolated and identified. It was investigated that quercetin has important functions that can be used as a dietary supplement. Flavonol synthase (FLS) is a key enzyme involved in quercetin biosynthesis, catalyzes the conversion of dihydroquercetin to quercetin. Therefore, we determined the sequence of the flavonol synthase gene (FLS) in red leaf lettuce. We harvested leaf lettuce grown using supplementary light sources, such as ultraviolet radiation B (UV-B), ultraviolet radiation A, blue, and red lamps during the night. It is noteworthy that FLS expression and the quercetin content were particularly increased to a greater extent in young leaves than in mature leaves when UV-B and blue light were used simultaneously at night. We suggest that UV-B with blue light is used simultaneously at night for producing leaf lettuce with high quercetin content.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2799
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B.
Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 20 Issue (up) 1 Pages 24
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.
Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Giavi, S.; Blosch, S.; Schuster, G.; Knop, E.
Title Artificial light at night can modify ecosystem functioning beyond the lit area Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue (up) 1 Pages 11870
Keywords plants; ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a relatively new and rapidly increasing global change driver. While evidence on adverse effects of ALAN for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is increasing, little is known on the spatial extent of its effects. We therefore tested whether ALAN can affect ecosystem functioning in areas adjacent to directly illuminated areas. We exposed two phytometer species to three different treatments of ALAN (sites directly illuminated, sites adjacent to directly illuminated sites, control sites without illumination), and we measured its effect on the reproductive output of both plant species. Furthermore, in one of the two plant species, we quantified pre-dispersal seed predation and the resulting relative reproductive output. Finally, under controlled condition in the laboratory, we assessed flower visitation and oviposition of the main seed predator in relation to light intensity. There was a trend for reduced reproductive output of one of the two plant species on directly illuminated sites, but not of the other. Compared to dark control sites, seed predation was significantly increased on dark sites adjacent to illuminated sites, which resulted in a significantly reduced relative reproductive output. Finally, in the laboratory, the main seed predator flew away from the light source to interact with its host plant in the darkest area available, which might explain the results found in the field. We conclude that ALAN can also affect ecosystem functioning in areas not directly illuminated, thereby having ecological consequences at a much larger scale than previously thought.
Address Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland. eva.knop@ieu.uzh.ch
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32681056; PMCID:PMC7368033 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3076
Permanent link to this record