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Author Sanders, D.; Kehoe, R.; Tiley, K.; Bennie, J.; Cruse, D.; Davies, T.W.; Frank van Veen, F.J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Artificial nighttime light changes aphid-parasitoid population dynamics Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 5 Issue (up) Pages 15232
Keywords Ecology; animals; plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is recognized as a widespread and increasingly important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wild species and their interactions. Understanding of how these impacts translate into changes in population dynamics of communities with multiple trophic levels is, however, severely lacking. In an outdoor mesocosm experiment we tested the effect of ALAN on the population dynamics of a plant-aphid-parasitoid community with one plant species, three aphid species and their specialist parasitoids. The light treatment reduced the abundance of two aphid species by 20% over five generations, most likely as a consequence of bottom-up effects, with reductions in bean plant biomass being observed. For the aphid Megoura viciae this effect was reversed under autumn conditions with the light treatment promoting continuous reproduction through asexuals. All three parasitoid species were negatively affected by the light treatment, through reduced host numbers and we discuss induced possible behavioural changes. These results suggest that, in addition to direct impacts on species behaviour, the impacts of ALAN can cascade through food webs with potentially far reaching effects on the wider ecosystem.
Address Environment &Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26472251; PMCID:PMC4607942 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1290
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Author Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K.
Title Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae
Volume 198 Issue (up) Pages 363-369
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387
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Author Chen, C. L.; Su, Y. H.; Liu, C.J.; Lee, Y.C.
Title Effect of Night Illumination on Growth and Yield of Soybean Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Taiwan Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal J. of Taiwan Agricultural Res.
Volume Issue (up) Pages
Keywords Plants; soybeans; Taiwan
Abstract To evaluate the potential of soybean as a crop for bio-fuel in Taiwan, field experiments were conducted in 2006 across the island, using an Australian variety ‘Leichardt’. This study was one of the field experiments at Hemei Township, Changhua County. Soybean was seeded by hand-spreading in the fall of 2006 and harvested in 2007. Results showed that seeding of soybean by hand-spreading affected uniformity of seed germination and caused high variations in yield in this field. Seed yield of soybean reached 770 kg ha-1 under good pest management and disease control. The study also showed that night illumination is an important factor affecting growth and yield of soybean. Plants growing near the roadside (within 10–20 m) were exposed to the night light, resulting in prolonged vegetative growth and delayed blossom period for about 1 to 4 weeks. Therefore, such plants suffered from poor pod filling due to low temperature stress at reproduction stage and delayed the harvest period for about 6 weeks. Nevertheless, seed yield of soybean plants exposed to the night illumination reached 1000 kg ha-1, which was slightly higher than soybean plants without exposuring to the night illumination.
Address chiling(at)tari.gov.tw
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute Place of Publication Editor
Language Chinese Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1395
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Author Tewolde, F.T.; Lu, N.; Shiina, K.; Maruo, T.; Takagaki, M.; Kozai, T.; Yamori, W.
Title Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-Truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Frontiers in Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Front Plant Sci
Volume 7 Issue (up) Pages 448
Keywords Plants; LED; fruit quality; lighting period; photosynthesis; plant factory; single-truss tomato; supplemental lighting; yield
Abstract Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter) during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 mumol m(-2) s(-1) measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20 and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED inter-lighting was also more cost-effective than daytime inter-lighting. Thus, nighttime LED inter-lighting can effectively improve tomato plant growth and yield with lower energy cost compared with daytime both in summer and winter.
Address Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, Chiba University, Kashiwa, Japan; Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Frontiers Media S.A. Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-462X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27092163; PMCID:PMC4823311 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1434
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Author Liu, J.D.; Goodspeed, D.; Sheng, Z.; Li, B.; Yang, Y.; Kliebenstein, D.J.; Braam, J.
Title Keeping the rhythm: light/dark cycles during postharvest storage preserve the tissue integrity and nutritional content of leafy plants Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 15 Issue (up) Pages 92
Keywords Plants
Abstract BACKGROUND: The modular body structure of plants enables detached plant organs, such as postharvest fruits and vegetables, to maintain active responsiveness to environmental stimuli, including daily cycles of light and darkness. Twenty-four hour light/darkness cycles entrain plant circadian clock rhythms, which provide advantage to plants. Here, we tested whether green leafy vegetables gain longevity advantage by being stored under light/dark cycles designed to maintain biological rhythms. RESULTS: Light/dark cycles during postharvest storage improved several aspects of plant tissue performance comparable to that provided by refrigeration. Tissue integrity, green coloration, and chlorophyll content were generally enhanced by cycling of light and darkness compared to constant light or darkness during storage. In addition, the levels of the phytonutrient glucosinolates in kale and cabbage remained at higher levels over time when the leaf tissue was stored under light/dark cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of the daily cycling of light and dark periods during postharvest storage may slow the decline of plant tissues, such as green leafy vegetables, improving not only appearance but also the health value of the crops through the maintenance of chlorophyll and phytochemical content after harvest.
Address Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, 77005, USA. braam@rice.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25879637; PMCID:PMC4396971 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1458
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