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Author Lawrence, B.K.; Fehr, W.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reproductive Response of Soybeans to Night Interruption1 Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Crop Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 755  
  Keywords (up) Plants  
  Abstract Artificial lights may be used to delay flowering of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. Previous research has suggested that night interruption imposed every other night would delay flowering as much as every-night interruption. Our objective was to evaluate the reproductive development of cultivars when exposed to night interruption every night compared with exposure every other night. One cultivar of each Maturity Group 00 through V was grown in the field at Ames, Iowa during 1978 and 1979. The four light treatments imposed every night or every other night included illumination with incandescent light from sunset to sunrise, 2300 to 0030 hours, 0030 to 0200 hours, or 0200 to 0330 hours. Control plots were not exposed to artificial light.

The average number of days that reproductive development was delayed beyond the control was twice as great for the every-night treatments as for the every-other-night treatments. Illumination from sunset to sunrise delayed reproductive development significantly more than the treatments of night interruption for 1.5 hours. Night interruption near the end of the dark period (0200 to 0330 hours) delayed reproductive development more than the earlier interruptions.

The results did not support the hypothesis that light treatments every other night would delay reproductive development as much as every-night interruptions. The lighting regime needed to delay reproductive development will depend on the photoperiod requirements of the cultivars and duration of the delay that is desired.
 
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  ISSN 0011-183X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2367  
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Author Raven, J.A.; Cockell, C.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe) Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Astrobiology Abbreviated Journal Astrobiology  
  Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 668-675  
  Keywords (up) Plants  
  Abstract Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.  
  Address Plant Research Unit, University of Dundee at SCRI, Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee, United Kingdom  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1557-8070 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16916290 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1198  
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Author Apostol, K.; Dumroese, R.K.; Pinto, J.R.; Davis, A.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Response of conifer species from three latitudinal populations to light spectra generated by light-emitting diodes and high-pressure sodium lamps Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Canadian Journal of Forest Research Abbreviated Journal Can. J. For. Res.  
  Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 1711-1719  
  Keywords (up) plants  
  Abstract Light-emitting diode (LED) technology shows promise for supplementing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest nurseries because of the potential reduction in energy consumption and an ability to supply discrete wavelengths to optimize seedling growth. Our objective was to examine the effects of light spectra supplied by LED and traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on growth and physiology of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) seedlings. We used three latitudinal sources for each species: British Columbia (BC), Idaho (ID), and New Mexico (NM). Container seedlings were grown for 17 weeks in the greenhouse under an 18-h photoperiod of ambient solar light supplemented with light delivered from HPS or LED. In general, seedlings grown under LED had significantly greater growth, gas exchange rates, and chlorophyll contents than those seedlings grown under HPS. The growth and physiological responses to supplemental lighting varied greatly among species and seed sources. Generally, LED-grown seedlings from BC had the greatest growth and tissue dry matter followed by ID and NM populations. Compared with HPS, the significant increase in seedling growth and concomitant energy savings with LED (29% energy consumption relative to HPS) demonstrates the promise of using LED as PAR supplemental lighting for container seedling production.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0045-5067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1250  
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Author Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae  
  Volume 198 Issue Pages 363-369  
  Keywords (up) Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, J.D.; Goodspeed, D.; Sheng, Z.; Li, B.; Yang, Y.; Kliebenstein, D.J.; Braam, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Keeping the rhythm: light/dark cycles during postharvest storage preserve the tissue integrity and nutritional content of leafy plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 92  
  Keywords (up) Plants  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The modular body structure of plants enables detached plant organs, such as postharvest fruits and vegetables, to maintain active responsiveness to environmental stimuli, including daily cycles of light and darkness. Twenty-four hour light/darkness cycles entrain plant circadian clock rhythms, which provide advantage to plants. Here, we tested whether green leafy vegetables gain longevity advantage by being stored under light/dark cycles designed to maintain biological rhythms. RESULTS: Light/dark cycles during postharvest storage improved several aspects of plant tissue performance comparable to that provided by refrigeration. Tissue integrity, green coloration, and chlorophyll content were generally enhanced by cycling of light and darkness compared to constant light or darkness during storage. In addition, the levels of the phytonutrient glucosinolates in kale and cabbage remained at higher levels over time when the leaf tissue was stored under light/dark cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of the daily cycling of light and dark periods during postharvest storage may slow the decline of plant tissues, such as green leafy vegetables, improving not only appearance but also the health value of the crops through the maintenance of chlorophyll and phytochemical content after harvest.  
  Address Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, 77005, USA. braam@rice.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25879637; PMCID:PMC4396971 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1458  
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