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Author Singhal, R. K., Kumar, M., & Bose, B.
Title Ecophysiological Responses of Artificial Night Light Pollution in Plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (down) Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Early in the 20th century, disparate human developmental processes culminate excess artificial light during night time and distort the phenological, physiological and ecological responses, which are sustained in the plants, animals and microorganism from millions of years. Earlier studies regarding artificial light (AL) during the night predominantly covered the drastic effects on animal systems. Although, drastic effects of AL during night time are enormous; therefore, the present topic is focused on the physiological and ecological consequences of artificial night light pollution (ANLP) on plant systems. In these consequences, most of the plant processes under ANLP are affected intensely and cause compelling changes in plant life cycle from germination to maturity. However, severe effects were observed in the case of pollination, photoreceptor signalling, flowering and microhabitats of plants. Along with drastic effects on ecology and environments, its relevance to human developmental processes cannot be avoided. Therefore, we need to equipoise between sustainable environment and steadily human development processes. Further, selection of plant/crop species, which are more responsive to ANLP, can minimize the ecological consequences of night light pollution. Likewise, changing artificial nightscape with the implication of new LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) lightening policies like UJALA (www.ujala.gov.in), which are low cost, more durable, eco-friendly and less emitter of CO2, have potential to overcome the biodiversity threats, which arise due to old artificial lightening technology from decades. Hence, adopting new advance artificial lightening technology and understanding its impact on plant ecosystem will be a future challenge for plant biologist.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2352
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Author Siemens, C.W.
Title III. On the influence of electric light upon vegetation, and on certain physical principles involved Type Journal Article
Year 1880 Publication (down) Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Abbreviated Journal Abstr. Pap. Printed Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond.
Volume 30 Issue 200-205 Pages 210-219
Keywords Plants
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ISSN 0370-1662 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2376
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Author ffrench-Constant, R.; Somers-Yeates, R.; Bennie, J.; Economou, T.; Hodgson, D.; Spalding, A.; McGregor, P.
Title Light pollution is associated with earlier tree budburst across the United Kingdom Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (down) Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Roy Soc B Biol Sci
Volume 283 Issue 1833 Pages 1-9
Keywords Plants; light pollution, phenology, species interactions, tree budburst, temperature, urban heat islands; United Kingdom
Abstract The ecological impact of night-time lighting is of concern because of its well-demonstrated effects on animal behaviour. However, the potential of light pollution to change plant phenology and its corresponding knock-on effects on associated herbivores are less clear. Here, we test if artificial lighting can advance the timing of budburst in trees. We took a UK-wide 13 year dataset of spatially referenced budburst data from four deciduous tree species and matched it with both satellite imagery of night-time lighting and average spring temperature. We find that budburst occurs up to 7.5 days earlier in brighter areas, with the relationship being more pronounced for later-budding species. Excluding large urban areas from the analysis showed an even more pronounced advance of budburst, confirming that the urban ‘heat-island’ effect is not the sole cause of earlier urban budburst. Similarly, the advance in budburst across all sites is too large to be explained by increases in temperature alone. This dramatic advance of budburst illustrates the need for further experimental investigation into the impact of artificial night-time lighting on plant phenology and subsequent species interactions. As light pollution is a growing global phenomenon, the findings of this study are likely to be applicable to a wide range of species interactions across the world.
Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and 2 Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9EZ, UK; rf222(at)exeter.ac.uk
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Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1472
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Author Bunning, E.; Moser, I.
Title Interference of moonlight with the photoperiodic measurement of time by plants, and their adaptive reaction Type Journal Article
Year 1969 Publication (down) Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
Volume 62 Issue 4 Pages 1018-1022
Keywords Plants; Moonlight
Abstract Threshold values of photoperiodic time-measurements correspond approximately to moonlight intensities. Experiments with Glycine and Euglena reveal that this is also the threshold value for synchronization of the circadian cycle. Saturation of this reaction is reached with 10 lx in 12:12 hr light-dark cycles. Thus, moonlight might disturb time measurement.In Glycine, Arachis, and Trifolium the intensity of the light coming from the moon to the upper surface of the leaf is reduced by circadian leaf movement to values between 5 and 20 per cent (or even less than 5 per cent) of full-moon light intensity. Such a reduction eliminates the disturbing effects of moonlight. This finding indicates that leaf movements have an adaptive value of the kind that Darwin sought to identify. It also indicates that the behavior of the upper leaf epidermis as a “sense organ for light”(13) has an adaptive value.In the short-day plants Perilla ocymoides and Chenopodium amaranticolor, a specific photoperiodic phenomenon was found that counteracts the disturbing effect of moonlight. Here light intensities similar to those of moonlight, introduced during the night, promote flowering instead of inhibiting it.
Address Institute Of Biology, University Of Tubingen, Germany
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ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:16591742; PMCID:PMC223607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3035
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Author Nelson, J.A.; Bugbee, B.
Title Economic analysis of greenhouse lighting: light emitting diodes vs. high intensity discharge fixtures Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication (down) PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 9 Issue 6 Pages e99010
Keywords Plants
Abstract Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400-700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture.
Address Crop Physiology Laboratory, Department of Plant Soils and Climate, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24905835; PMCID:PMC4048233 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2233
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