|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Shimomura, M.; Yoshida, H.; Fujiuchi, N.; Ariizumi, T.; Ezura, H.; Fukuda, N.
Title Continuous blue lighting and elevated carbon dioxide concentration rapidly increase chlorogenic acid content in young lettuce plants Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae
Volume 272 Issue Pages 109550
Keywords Plants
Abstract Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is a strong antioxidant that potentially reduces oxidative damage in human cells. In this study, the effects of environmental factors such as photoperiod, light quality and intensity, and CO2 concentration on the growth and CGA content of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were evaluated. CGA content in fresh lettuce increased under high light intensity treatments, doubling in concentration under 200 μmol m−2 s-1 compared to 100 μmol m−2 s-1. Elevated CO2 concentration also increased CGA content in fresh lettuce, quadrupling in concentration when grown at 1000 ppm compared to 400 ppm. Furthermore, there was a compound effect of light intensity and CO2 concentration whereby a light intensity level of 200 μmol m−2 s-1 and CO2 of 1000 ppm produced an even higher concentration of CGA, 199 mg per 100 g of fresh lettuce. Increased CGA concentration because of continuous lighting and elevated CO2 was observed under both fluorescent light and blue LED, but not under red LED treatment. Increased day length also induced higher CGA content in lettuce plants. These results show that continuous lighting, including blue spectrum and elevated CO2 concentration can cause higher CGA accumulation in lettuce plants. The observed increase in CGA content was induced only for 2 days after treatment was initiated. One possible interpretation of the data is that physiological stress caused by excess photosynthesis under continuous lighting results in higher CGA content to protect the plant body from high levels of reactive oxidative species. In addition, blue light and CO2 could be stimulus signals for inducing high CGA accumulation via metabolite changes.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3090
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sanders, D.; Kehoe, R.; Tiley, K.; Bennie, J.; Cruse, D.; Davies, T.W.; Frank van Veen, F.J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Artificial nighttime light changes aphid-parasitoid population dynamics Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication (up) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 5 Issue Pages 15232
Keywords Ecology; animals; plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is recognized as a widespread and increasingly important anthropogenic environmental pressure on wild species and their interactions. Understanding of how these impacts translate into changes in population dynamics of communities with multiple trophic levels is, however, severely lacking. In an outdoor mesocosm experiment we tested the effect of ALAN on the population dynamics of a plant-aphid-parasitoid community with one plant species, three aphid species and their specialist parasitoids. The light treatment reduced the abundance of two aphid species by 20% over five generations, most likely as a consequence of bottom-up effects, with reductions in bean plant biomass being observed. For the aphid Megoura viciae this effect was reversed under autumn conditions with the light treatment promoting continuous reproduction through asexuals. All three parasitoid species were negatively affected by the light treatment, through reduced host numbers and we discuss induced possible behavioural changes. These results suggest that, in addition to direct impacts on species behaviour, the impacts of ALAN can cascade through food webs with potentially far reaching effects on the wider ecosystem.
Address Environment &Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9EZ, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26472251; PMCID:PMC4607942 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1290
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Correa-Cano, M.E.; Goettsch, B.; Duffy, J.P.; Bennie, J.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Erosion of natural darkness in the geographic ranges of cacti Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 4347
Keywords Plants; Remote Sensing
Abstract Naturally dark nighttime environments are being widely eroded by the introduction of artificial light at night (ALAN). The biological impacts vary with the intensity and spectrum of ALAN, but have been documented from molecules to ecosystems. How globally severe these impacts are likely to be depends in large part on the relationship between the spatio-temporal distribution of ALAN and that of the geographic ranges of species. Here, we determine this relationship for the Cactaceae family. Using maps of the geographic ranges of cacti and nighttime stable light composite images for the period 1992 to 2012, we found that a high percentage of cactus species were experiencing ALAN within their ranges in 1992, and that this percentage had increased by 2012. For almost all cactus species (89.7%) the percentage of their geographic range that was lit increased from 1992-1996 to 2008-2012, often markedly. There was a significant negative relationship between the species richness of an area, and that of threatened species, and the level of ALAN. Cacti could be particularly sensitive to this widespread and ongoing intrusion of ALAN into their geographic ranges, especially when considering the potential for additive and synergistic interactions with the impacts of other anthropogenic pressures.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29531261; PMCID:PMC5847551 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1824
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Giavi, S.; Blosch, S.; Schuster, G.; Knop, E.
Title Artificial light at night can modify ecosystem functioning beyond the lit area Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 11870
Keywords plants; ecology
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a relatively new and rapidly increasing global change driver. While evidence on adverse effects of ALAN for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning is increasing, little is known on the spatial extent of its effects. We therefore tested whether ALAN can affect ecosystem functioning in areas adjacent to directly illuminated areas. We exposed two phytometer species to three different treatments of ALAN (sites directly illuminated, sites adjacent to directly illuminated sites, control sites without illumination), and we measured its effect on the reproductive output of both plant species. Furthermore, in one of the two plant species, we quantified pre-dispersal seed predation and the resulting relative reproductive output. Finally, under controlled condition in the laboratory, we assessed flower visitation and oviposition of the main seed predator in relation to light intensity. There was a trend for reduced reproductive output of one of the two plant species on directly illuminated sites, but not of the other. Compared to dark control sites, seed predation was significantly increased on dark sites adjacent to illuminated sites, which resulted in a significantly reduced relative reproductive output. Finally, in the laboratory, the main seed predator flew away from the light source to interact with its host plant in the darkest area available, which might explain the results found in the field. We conclude that ALAN can also affect ecosystem functioning in areas not directly illuminated, thereby having ecological consequences at a much larger scale than previously thought.
Address Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057, Zurich, Switzerland. eva.knop@ieu.uzh.ch
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32681056; PMCID:PMC7368033 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3076
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Palmer, M.; Gibbons, R.; Bhagavathula, R.; Holshouser, D.
Title Roadway Lighting’s Impact on Altering Soybean Growth – Volume 2: LED versus HPS Color Spectral Impact Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Technical Report Abbreviated Journal
Volume FHWA-ICT-18-009 Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract The impact of roadway lighting on soybean plant growth and development, was measured in situ at three locations in the state of Illinois. These locations were situated in close proximity of each other for the purpose of evaluating whether there was a difference in the soy response to HPS roadway lighting, versus soy lit by a specific model of 4,000K LED roadway lighting. The plant data collection included the reproductive-stage, the plant moisture content, and the dried seed weight after harvest. The impact of the type of roadway lighting on the reproduction stage and normalized yield was within the modeling confidence limits at a level of 90%. Modifications are recommended to the specification for roadway lighting trespass. This will minimize the impact on soybean plants based on the two roadway luminaire designs included in this study.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Illinois Center for Transportation/Illinois Department of Transportation Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0197-9191 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2264
Permanent link to this record