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Author ffrench-Constant, R.; Somers-Yeates, R.; Bennie, J.; Economou, T.; Hodgson, D.; Spalding, A.; McGregor, P.
Title Light pollution is associated with earlier tree budburst across the United Kingdom Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Roy Soc B Biol Sci
Volume 283 Issue 1833 Pages 1-9
Keywords Plants; light pollution, phenology, species interactions, tree budburst, temperature, urban heat islands; United Kingdom
Abstract The ecological impact of night-time lighting is of concern because of its well-demonstrated effects on animal behaviour. However, the potential of light pollution to change plant phenology and its corresponding knock-on effects on associated herbivores are less clear. Here, we test if artificial lighting can advance the timing of budburst in trees. We took a UK-wide 13 year dataset of spatially referenced budburst data from four deciduous tree species and matched it with both satellite imagery of night-time lighting and average spring temperature. We find that budburst occurs up to 7.5 days earlier in brighter areas, with the relationship being more pronounced for later-budding species. Excluding large urban areas from the analysis showed an even more pronounced advance of budburst, confirming that the urban ‘heat-island’ effect is not the sole cause of earlier urban budburst. Similarly, the advance in budburst across all sites is too large to be explained by increases in temperature alone. This dramatic advance of budburst illustrates the need for further experimental investigation into the impact of artificial night-time lighting on plant phenology and subsequent species interactions. As light pollution is a growing global phenomenon, the findings of this study are likely to be applicable to a wide range of species interactions across the world.
Address Centre for Ecology and Conservation, and 2 Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9EZ, UK; rf222(at)exeter.ac.uk
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Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1472
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Author Siemens, C.W.
Title III. On the influence of electric light upon vegetation, and on certain physical principles involved Type Journal Article
Year 1880 Publication (up) Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Abbreviated Journal Abstr. Pap. Printed Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond.
Volume 30 Issue 200-205 Pages 210-219
Keywords Plants
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ISSN 0370-1662 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2376
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Author Singhal, R. K., Kumar, M., & Bose, B.
Title Ecophysiological Responses of Artificial Night Light Pollution in Plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Early in the 20th century, disparate human developmental processes culminate excess artificial light during night time and distort the phenological, physiological and ecological responses, which are sustained in the plants, animals and microorganism from millions of years. Earlier studies regarding artificial light (AL) during the night predominantly covered the drastic effects on animal systems. Although, drastic effects of AL during night time are enormous; therefore, the present topic is focused on the physiological and ecological consequences of artificial night light pollution (ANLP) on plant systems. In these consequences, most of the plant processes under ANLP are affected intensely and cause compelling changes in plant life cycle from germination to maturity. However, severe effects were observed in the case of pollination, photoreceptor signalling, flowering and microhabitats of plants. Along with drastic effects on ecology and environments, its relevance to human developmental processes cannot be avoided. Therefore, we need to equipoise between sustainable environment and steadily human development processes. Further, selection of plant/crop species, which are more responsive to ANLP, can minimize the ecological consequences of night light pollution. Likewise, changing artificial nightscape with the implication of new LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) lightening policies like UJALA (www.ujala.gov.in), which are low cost, more durable, eco-friendly and less emitter of CO2, have potential to overcome the biodiversity threats, which arise due to old artificial lightening technology from decades. Hence, adopting new advance artificial lightening technology and understanding its impact on plant ecosystem will be a future challenge for plant biologist.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2352
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Author Shillo, R., & Halevy, A. H.
Title Interaction of photoperiod and temperature in flowering-control of Gypsophila paniculata L Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication (up) Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal
Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 385-393
Keywords Plants
Abstract Long day promotes flowering of Gysophila paniculata L cultivar ‘Bristol Fairy’. Repeated treatments with GA3 or GA4 + 7 in short days did not promote flowering. The long photoperiod is effective only at relatively high temperatures. At night temperatures below 12°C, the plants remain vegetative even in long days. Efficient artificial lighting is from incandescent lamps at 60–100 lux. Fluorescent lighting (Cool-White) is not effective. Lighting of 4 hours as a night-break or at the end of the night were equally effective, but 4 hours lighting as a day-extension was less effective. Whole-night lighting promoted flowering more than any of the 4-hour lighting regimes. Cyclic lighting of one third light in each cycle promoted flowering to the same extent as continuous lighting. Light intensity during the day has a decisive effect on flower production.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2370
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Author Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K.
Title Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae
Volume 198 Issue Pages 363-369
Keywords Plants
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ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387
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