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Author Tewolde, F.T.; Lu, N.; Shiina, K.; Maruo, T.; Takagaki, M.; Kozai, T.; Yamori, W.
Title Nighttime Supplemental LED Inter-lighting Improves Growth and Yield of Single-Truss Tomatoes by Enhancing Photosynthesis in Both Winter and Summer Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Frontiers in Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Front Plant Sci
Volume 7 Issue Pages 448
Keywords Plants; LED; fruit quality; lighting period; photosynthesis; plant factory; single-truss tomato; supplemental lighting; yield
Abstract Greenhouses with sophisticated environmental control systems, or so-called plant factories with solar light, enable growers to achieve high yields of produce with desirable qualities. In a greenhouse crop with high planting density, low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) at the lower leaves tends to limit plant growth, especially in the winter when the solar altitude and PPFD at the canopy are low and day length is shorter than in summer. Therefore, providing supplemental lighting to the lower canopy can increase year-round productivity. However, supplemental lighting can be expensive. In some places, the cost of electricity is lower at night, but the effect of using supplemental light at night has not yet been examined. In this study, we examined the effects of supplemental LED inter-lighting (LED inter-lighting hereafter) during the daytime or nighttime on photosynthesis, growth, and yield of single-truss tomato plants both in winter and summer. We used LED inter-lighting modules with combined red and blue light to illuminate lower leaves right after the first anthesis. The PPFD of this light was 165 mumol m(-2) s(-1) measured at 10 cm from the LED module. LED inter-lighting was provided from 4:00 am to 4:00 pm for the daytime treatments and from 10:00 pm to 10:00 am for the nighttime treatments. Plants exposed only to solar light were used as controls. Daytime LED inter-lighting increased the photosynthetic capacity of middle and lower canopy leaves, which significantly increased yield by 27% in winter; however, photosynthetic capacity and yield were not significantly increased during summer. Nighttime LED inter-lighting increased photosynthetic capacity in both winter and summer, and yield increased by 24% in winter and 12% in summer. In addition, nighttime LED inter-lighting in winter significantly increased the total soluble solids and ascorbic acid content of the tomato fruits, by 20 and 25%, respectively. Use of nighttime LED inter-lighting was also more cost-effective than daytime inter-lighting. Thus, nighttime LED inter-lighting can effectively improve tomato plant growth and yield with lower energy cost compared with daytime both in summer and winter.
Address Center for Environment, Health and Field Sciences, Chiba University, Kashiwa, Japan; Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Frontiers Media S.A. Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-462X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:27092163; PMCID:PMC4823311 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1434
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Author Palmer, M.; Gibbons, R.; Bhagavathula, R.; Holshouser, D.
Title Roadway Lighting’s Impact on Altering Soybean Growth – Volume 2: LED versus HPS Color Spectral Impact Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Technical Report Abbreviated Journal
Volume FHWA-ICT-18-009 Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract The impact of roadway lighting on soybean plant growth and development, was measured in situ at three locations in the state of Illinois. These locations were situated in close proximity of each other for the purpose of evaluating whether there was a difference in the soy response to HPS roadway lighting, versus soy lit by a specific model of 4,000K LED roadway lighting. The plant data collection included the reproductive-stage, the plant moisture content, and the dried seed weight after harvest. The impact of the type of roadway lighting on the reproduction stage and normalized yield was within the modeling confidence limits at a level of 90%. Modifications are recommended to the specification for roadway lighting trespass. This will minimize the impact on soybean plants based on the two roadway luminaire designs included in this study.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Illinois Center for Transportation/Illinois Department of Transportation Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0197-9191 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2264
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Author Matzke, E. B.
Title The Effect of Street Lights in Delaying Leaf-Fall in Certain Trees Type Journal Article
Year 1936 Publication American Journal of Botany Abbreviated Journal Amer. J. of Botany
Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 446-452
Keywords Plants; trees; Carolina poplar; Populus canadensis; London plane; Platanus acerifolia; sycamore; Platanus occidentalis; crack willow; Salix fragilis; New York; New York City
Abstract Street lights in the City of New York cause a retention of the leaves of certain trees: Carolina poplar (Populus canadensis), London plane (Platanus acerifolia), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), and crack willow (Salix fragilis). Illuminated portions of a tree retain their leaves; shaded portions of the same tree do not. One side of a tree, or the lower part, may thus have numerous leaves, while the other side, and the upper part, may be entirely devoid of foliage. A relatively weak light, at a distance of as much as 45 feet from the tip of the nearest branch, may cause retention of numerous leaves. Light intensity as low as 1 foot candle, or less, may be effective. Some leaves may be retained at least a month, others more than that, beyond the normal season. The orientation of the light with respect to the tree – i.e., north, east, south, and west – is not significant. In Populus canadensis all of the leaves ultimately fall, abscission apparently taking place at the base of the petiole. In Platanus acerifolia and Platanus occidentalis some of the leaves are retained until killed by low temperature; then some of them break off above the base of the petiole. Leaves of the Populus and Platanus species discussed remain green unusually long when receiving additional illumination. Leaves of these same trees do not emerge from the buds earlier in the spring as a result of the additional illumination.
Address n/a
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) JSTOR Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0002-9122 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1394
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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Cascading effects of artificial light at night: resource-mediated control of herbivores in a grassland ecosystem Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 2015 Issue Pages 20140131
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; photopollution; artificial light at night; biotic interactions; community-level; bottom-up effects; grasslands; herbivores; invertebrates; pea aphid; Acyrthosiphon pisum; plants; insects
Abstract Artificial light at night has a wide range of biological effects on both plants and animals. Here, we review mechanisms by which artificial light at night may restructure ecological communities by modifying the interactions between species. Such mechanisms may be top-down (predator, parasite or grazer controlled), bottom-up (resource-controlled) or involve non-trophic processes, such as pollination, seed dispersal or competition. We present results from an experiment investigating both top-down and bottom-up effects of artificial light at night on the population density of pea aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum in a diverse artificial grassland community in the presence and absence of predators and under low-level light of different spectral composition. We found no evidence for top-down control of A. pisum in this system, but did find evidence for bottom-up effects mediated through the impact of light on flower head density in a leguminous food plant. These results suggest that physiological effects of light on a plant species within a diverse plant community can have detectable demographic effects on a specialist herbivore.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9FE, UK; k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1128
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Author Rydin, C; Bolinder, K
Title Moonlight pollination in the gymnosperm Ephedra (Gnetales) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Biology Letters Abbreviated Journal Biol. Lett.
Volume 11 Issue 4 Pages 20140993
Keywords Plants; anemophily; entomophily; lunar phases; nocturnal insects; lunar cycle; light at night; Ephedra; Ephedra distachya; pollination
Abstract Most gymnosperms are wind-pollinated, but some are insect-pollinated, and in Ephedra (Gnetales), both wind pollination and insect pollination occur. Little is, however, known about mechanisms and evolution of pollination syndromes in gymnosperms. Based on four seasons of field studies, we show an unexpected correlation between pollination and the phases of the moon in one of our studied species, Ephedra foeminea. It is pollinated by dipterans and lepidopterans, most of them nocturnal, and its pollination coincides with the full moon of July. This may be adaptive in two ways. Many nocturnal insects navigate using the moon. Further, the spectacular reflection of the full-moonlight in the pollination drops is the only apparent means of nocturnal attraction of insects in these plants. In the sympatric but wind-pollinated Ephedra distachya, pollination is not correlated to the full moon but occurs at approximately the same dates every year. The lunar correlation has probably been lost in most species of Ephedra subsequent an evolutionary shift to wind pollination in the clade. When the services of insects are no longer needed for successful pollination, the adaptive value of correlating pollination with the full moon is lost, and conceivably also the trait.
Address Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, Stockholm 106 91, Sweden
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher (up) Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1143
Permanent link to this record