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Author Nelson, J.A.; Bugbee, B.
Title Economic analysis of greenhouse lighting: light emitting diodes vs. high intensity discharge fixtures Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 9 Issue 6 Pages e99010
Keywords Plants
Abstract Lighting technologies for plant growth are improving rapidly, providing numerous options for supplemental lighting in greenhouses. Here we report the photosynthetic (400-700 nm) photon efficiency and photon distribution pattern of two double-ended HPS fixtures, five mogul-base HPS fixtures, ten LED fixtures, three ceramic metal halide fixtures, and two fluorescent fixtures. The two most efficient LED and the two most efficient double-ended HPS fixtures had nearly identical efficiencies at 1.66 to 1.70 micromoles per joule. These four fixtures represent a dramatic improvement over the 1.02 micromoles per joule efficiency of the mogul-base HPS fixtures that are in common use. The best ceramic metal halide and fluorescent fixtures had efficiencies of 1.46 and 0.95 micromoles per joule, respectively. We also calculated the initial capital cost of fixtures per photon delivered and determined that LED fixtures cost five to ten times more than HPS fixtures. The five-year electric plus fixture cost per mole of photons is thus 2.3 times higher for LED fixtures, due to high capital costs. Compared to electric costs, our analysis indicates that the long-term maintenance costs are small for both technologies. If widely spaced benches are a necessary part of a production system, the unique ability of LED fixtures to efficiently focus photons on specific areas can be used to improve the photon capture by plant canopies. Our analysis demonstrates, however, that the cost per photon delivered is higher in these systems, regardless of fixture category. The lowest lighting system costs are realized when an efficient fixture is coupled with effective canopy photon capture.
Address Crop Physiology Laboratory, Department of Plant Soils and Climate, Utah State University, Logan, Utah, United States of America
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:24905835; PMCID:PMC4048233 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2233
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Author Owen, W. G., & Lopez, R. G.
Title Comparison of Sole-source and Supplemental Lighting on Callus Formation and Initial Rhizogenesis of Gaura and Salvia Cuttings Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal
Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 684-691
Keywords Plants
Abstract Variability in outdoor daily temperatures and photosynthetic daily light integrals (DLIs) from early spring to late fall limits the ability of propagators to accurately control propagation environments to consistently callus, root, and yield compact herbaceous perennial rooted liners. We evaluated and compared the effects of sole-source lighting (SSL) delivered from red (R) and blue (B) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to supplemental lighting (SL) provided by high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on herbaceous perennial cutting morphology, physiology, and growth during callusing and initial rhizogenesis. Cuttings of perennial sage (Salvia nemorosa L. ‘Lyrical Blues’) and wand flower (Gaura lindheimeri Engelm. and A. Gray ‘Siskiyou Pink’) were propagated in a walk-in growth chamber under multilayer SSL provided by LEDs with [R (660 nm)]:[B (460 nm)] light ratios (%) of 100:0 (R100:B0), 75:25 (R75:B25), 50:50 (R50:B50), or 0:100 (R0:B100) delivering 60 µmol·m−2·s–1 for 16 hours (total DLI of 3.4 mol·m−2·d−1). In a glass-glazed greenhouse (GH control), cuttings were propagated under ambient solar light and day-extension SL provided by HPS lamps delivering 40 µmol·m−2·s–1 to provide a 16-hour photoperiod (total DLI of 3.3 mol·m−2·d−1). At 10 days after sticking cuttings, callus diameter and rooting percentage were similar among all light-quality treatments. For instance, callus diameter, a measure of growth, of wand flower cuttings increased from an average 1.7 mm at stick (0 day) to a range of 2.7 to 2.9 mm at 10 days after sticking, regardless of lighting treatment. Relative leaf chlorophyll content was generally greater under SSL R75:B25 or R50:B50 than all other light-quality treatments. However, stem length of perennial sage and wand flower cuttings propagated under SSL R50:B50 at 10 days were 21% and 30% shorter and resulted in 50% and 8% greater root biomass, respectively, compared with those under SL. The herbaceous perennial cuttings propagated in this study under SSL R50:B50 were of similar quality or more compact compared with those under SL, indicating that callus induction and initial rooting can occur under LEDs in a multilayer SSL propagation system.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2346
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Author Chang, C., Chang, K., & Fu, W.
Title Testing of Various Monochromatic LED Lights Used in Supplemental Irradiation of Lettuce in Modern urban Rooftop Polytunnels Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Applied Engineering in Agriculture Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Urban farming could provide both vegetable growers and urban dwellers in general with more direct access to various fresh vegetables. Nevertheless, certain challenging problems associated with urban farming, including a lack of cultivation space and the effects of urban heat islands, must still be solved. Relatedly, a grower must, in some cases, also know how to utilize various forms of technology, such as lighting systems, as well as factors such as water availability. In this study, an original rooftop polytunnel design for lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Lollo Rosso) cultivation equipped with a hydroponic system and light emitting diodes (LEDs) is proposed. Various monochromatic lights were also tested for their effects on different quality parameters of lettuce. Specifically, supplemental red (655 nm), blue (445 nm), green (520 nm), and ultraviolet (380 nm) LED lights were used at night to apply photon fluxes of 150, 150, 150, and 20 μmol.m-2.s-1, respectively. The resulting effects of these different colored LEDs on the pigment concentration and growth response of the lettuce grown inside the roof polytunnel were then investigated. The experiment was then repeated several times with different environmental parameters in order to compare the effects of the different light wavelengths under higher temperatures and higher natural irradiation conditions.The results indicated that supplemental red or blue light at night could be strategically employed to maintain low nitrate levels and enhance the nutritional value and growth of lettuce grown in roof polytunnels.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2349
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Author Singhal, R. K., Kumar, M., & Bose, B.
Title Ecophysiological Responses of Artificial Night Light Pollution in Plants Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Early in the 20th century, disparate human developmental processes culminate excess artificial light during night time and distort the phenological, physiological and ecological responses, which are sustained in the plants, animals and microorganism from millions of years. Earlier studies regarding artificial light (AL) during the night predominantly covered the drastic effects on animal systems. Although, drastic effects of AL during night time are enormous; therefore, the present topic is focused on the physiological and ecological consequences of artificial night light pollution (ANLP) on plant systems. In these consequences, most of the plant processes under ANLP are affected intensely and cause compelling changes in plant life cycle from germination to maturity. However, severe effects were observed in the case of pollination, photoreceptor signalling, flowering and microhabitats of plants. Along with drastic effects on ecology and environments, its relevance to human developmental processes cannot be avoided. Therefore, we need to equipoise between sustainable environment and steadily human development processes. Further, selection of plant/crop species, which are more responsive to ANLP, can minimize the ecological consequences of night light pollution. Likewise, changing artificial nightscape with the implication of new LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) lightening policies like UJALA (www.ujala.gov.in), which are low cost, more durable, eco-friendly and less emitter of CO2, have potential to overcome the biodiversity threats, which arise due to old artificial lightening technology from decades. Hence, adopting new advance artificial lightening technology and understanding its impact on plant ecosystem will be a future challenge for plant biologist.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2352
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Author Kadman-Zahavi, A., & Ephrat, E.
Title The efficiency of different light sources in inducing spray carnation flowering Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal
Volume 18 Issue Pages 159--167
Keywords Plants
Abstract Light from Gro-lux fluorescent lamps, as a 4-h night break, was found to be more effective than incandescent light in promoting spray carnation flowering under natural daylight conditions. When the illuminations were applied for 4 h in the middle of the night, the effectiveness of a certain amount of radiant energy from incandescent light was found to be the same whether applied as intermittent or as continuous illumination.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2371
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