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Author Clark, N.A.
Title The Rate of Reproduction of Lemna Major as a Function of Intensity and Duration of Light Type Journal Article
Year 1924 Publication The Journal of Physical Chemistry Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Chem.
Volume 29 Issue 8 Pages 935-941
Keywords Plants
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ISSN 0092-7325 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2374
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Author Eng, R.Y.N.; Tsujita, M.J.; Grodzinski, B.
Title The effects of supplementary HPS lighting and carbon dioxide enrichment on the vegetative growth, nutritional status and flowering characteristics ofChrysanthemum morifoliumRamat Type Journal Article
Year 1985 Publication Journal of Horticultural Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Horticultural Science
Volume 60 Issue 3 Pages 389-395
Keywords Plants
Abstract Supplementary high pressure sodium (HPS) lighting (140 µmol m−2s−1) and CO2 enrichment (1375 µl l−1) improved the vegetative growth of Chrysanthemum morifolium cv Dramatic by increases in stem length, stem diameter, root weight ratio, dry weight, relative growth and net assimilation rates. Three-week-old chrysanthemums grown under CO2 enrichment and HPS lighting had lower leaf weight and stem weight ratios as well as lower foliar nutrient content than those grown under ambient CO2 and natural light. Plants grown on to maturity under CO2 enrichment and supplementary HPS lighting had the longest stem lengths, the most flowers and greatest increase in dry weight. The combination of both additional light and CO2 was superior to either factor used alone. With 24 h HPS supplementary lighting CO2 enrichment was most effective in improving vegetative growth and flower quality when applied during the daytime. Night CO2 enrichment was not commercially beneficial at the light levels employed in this study.
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ISSN 0022-1589 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2373
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Author Arnott, J. T.
Title Growth Response of White and Englemann Spruce Seedlings to Extended Photoperiod Using Three Light Intensities Type Report
Year 1982 Publication Technical Report: Pacific Forestry Centre Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Four seedlots of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and three of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry), covering a range of 10 degrees of latitude and a range of altitudes, were sown in BC/ CFS Styroblocks and grown in a heated greenhouse and an unheated shadehouse, using incandescent light to provide a 19-h photoperiod. Four intensities of lighting were used: 0, 100,200, and 400 Ix. A second experiment with the same seedlots was conducted in growth rooms that were programmed to evaluate the effect of low night temperature on seedling shoot growth when the photoperiod was extended to 19 h, using a light intensity of 200 Ix.

Shoot length of white and Engelmann spruce seedlings grown under an extended daylength of 100 Ix were significantly taller than the control (0 Ix). There were no significant differences in shoot length or weight among the three intensities of light used to extend the photoperiod for all seedlots except the southern latitude-low elevation population of Engelmann spruce. The more northern populations of white spruce and the high altitude populations of Engelmann spruce did not require light intensities higher than 100 Ix to maintain apical growth. Low night temperature (7°C) did produce significantly smaller seedlings than the warm night (1SoC) regime. However, terminal resting buds of seedlings grown under the cool night regime did not form any sooner than on those seedlings grown under warm nights.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2372
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Author Kadman-Zahavi, A., & Ephrat, E.
Title The efficiency of different light sources in inducing spray carnation flowering Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal
Volume 18 Issue Pages 159--167
Keywords Plants
Abstract Light from Gro-lux fluorescent lamps, as a 4-h night break, was found to be more effective than incandescent light in promoting spray carnation flowering under natural daylight conditions. When the illuminations were applied for 4 h in the middle of the night, the effectiveness of a certain amount of radiant energy from incandescent light was found to be the same whether applied as intermittent or as continuous illumination.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2371
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Author Shillo, R., & Halevy, A. H.
Title Interaction of photoperiod and temperature in flowering-control of Gypsophila paniculata L Type Journal Article
Year 1982 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal
Volume 16 Issue 4 Pages 385-393
Keywords Plants
Abstract Long day promotes flowering of Gysophila paniculata L cultivar ‘Bristol Fairy’. Repeated treatments with GA3 or GA4 + 7 in short days did not promote flowering. The long photoperiod is effective only at relatively high temperatures. At night temperatures below 12°C, the plants remain vegetative even in long days. Efficient artificial lighting is from incandescent lamps at 60–100 lux. Fluorescent lighting (Cool-White) is not effective. Lighting of 4 hours as a night-break or at the end of the night were equally effective, but 4 hours lighting as a day-extension was less effective. Whole-night lighting promoted flowering more than any of the 4-hour lighting regimes. Cyclic lighting of one third light in each cycle promoted flowering to the same extent as continuous lighting. Light intensity during the day has a decisive effect on flower production.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial (down) 2370
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