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Author Falcon, J.; Torriglia, A.; Attia, D.; Vienot, F.; Gronfier, C.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Hicks, D.
Title Exposure to Artificial Light at Night and the Consequences for Flora, Fauna, and Ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Frontiers in Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Neurosci
Volume 14 Issue Pages 602796
Keywords Review; Animals; Plants; Ecology; anthropogenic impact; artificial-light-at-night; biological clocks; ecosystems; light-emitting-diodes; photoreception
Abstract The present review draws together wide-ranging studies performed over the last decades that catalogue the effects of artificial-light-at-night (ALAN) upon living species and their environment. We provide an overview of the tremendous variety of light-detection strategies which have evolved in living organisms – unicellular, plants and animals, covering chloroplasts (plants), and the plethora of ocular and extra-ocular organs (animals). We describe the visual pigments which permit photo-detection, paying attention to their spectral characteristics, which extend from the ultraviolet into infrared. We discuss how organisms use light information in a way crucial for their development, growth and survival: phototropism, phototaxis, photoperiodism, and synchronization of circadian clocks. These aspects are treated in depth, as their perturbation underlies much of the disruptive effects of ALAN. The review goes into detail on circadian networks in living organisms, since these fundamental features are of critical importance in regulating the interface between environment and body. Especially, hormonal synthesis and secretion are often under circadian and circannual control, hence perturbation of the clock will lead to hormonal imbalance. The review addresses how the ubiquitous introduction of light-emitting diode technology may exacerbate, or in some cases reduce, the generalized ever-increasing light pollution. Numerous examples are given of how widespread exposure to ALAN is perturbing many aspects of plant and animal behaviour and survival: foraging, orientation, migration, seasonal reproduction, colonization and more. We examine the potential problems at the level of individual species and populations and extend the debate to the consequences for ecosystems. We stress, through a few examples, the synergistic harmful effects resulting from the impacts of ALAN combined with other anthropogenic pressures, which often impact the neuroendocrine loops in vertebrates. The article concludes by debating how these anthropogenic changes could be mitigated by more reasonable use of available technology – for example by restricting illumination to more essential areas and hours, directing lighting to avoid wasteful radiation and selecting spectral emissions, to reduce impact on circadian clocks. We end by discussing how society should take into account the potentially major consequences that ALAN has on the natural world and the repercussions for ongoing human health and welfare.
Address Inserm, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Integratives, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1662-453X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:33304237; PMCID:PMC7701298 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3245
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Author Elkins, C.; Van Iersel, M. W.
Title Supplemental Far-red Light-emitting Diode Light Increases Growth of Foxglove Seedlings Under Sole-source Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication HortTechnology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages 564-569
Keywords Plants
Abstract Seedlings may be grown indoors where environmental conditions can be precisely controlled to ensure consistent and reliable production. The optimal spectrum for production under sole-source lighting is currently unknown. Far-red light (λ = 700–800 nm) typically is not a significant part of the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED) grow lights. However, far-red light is photosynthetically active and can enhance leaf elongation, which may result in larger leaves and increased light interception. We hypothesized that adding far-red light to sole-source lighting would increase the growth of ‘Dalmatian Peach’ foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) seedlings grown under white LED lights, potentially shortening production times. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of far-red light intensities, ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1, on the growth and morphology of foxglove seedlings. Foxglove seedlings were grown in a growth chamber with a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 186 ± 6.4 μmol·m−2·s−1 and supplemental far-red light intensities ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1. As far-red light increased, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, plant height, and plant height/number of leaves increased by 38% (P = 0.004), 20% (P = 0.029), 38% (P = 0.025), and 34% (P = 0.024), respectively, while root weight fraction decreased 16% (P = 0.034). Although we expected supplemental far-red light to induce leaf and/or stem expansion, specific leaf area and compactness (two measures of morphology) were unaffected. Because a 37% increase in total photon flux density (PPFD plus far-red light) resulted in a 34.5% increase in total plant dry weight, the increased growth likely was due to increased photosynthesis rather than a shade-acclimation response. The growth response was linear across the 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1 range of far-fed light tested, so we were unable to determine a saturating far-red photon flux density.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3266
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Author Zheng, Q.; Teo, H.C.; Koh, L.P.
Title Artificial Light at Night Advances Spring Phenology in the United States Type Journal Article
Year 2021 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 399
Keywords Plants; Remote sensing
Abstract Plant phenology is closely related to light availability as diurnal and seasonal cycles are essential environmental cues for organizing bio-ecological processes. The natural cycles of light, however, have been dramatically disrupted by artificial light at night (ALAN) due to recent urbanization. The influence on plant phenology of ALAN and its spatial variation remain largely unknown. By analyzing satellite data on ALAN intensity across the United States, here, we showed that ALAN tended to advance the start date of the growing season (SOS), although the overall response of SOS to ALAN was relatively weak compared with other potential factors (e.g., preseason temperature). The phenological impact of ALAN showed a spatially divergent pattern, whereby ALAN mainly advanced SOS at climatically moderate regions within the United States (e.g., Virginia), while its effect was insignificant or even reversed at very cold (e.g., Minnesota) and hot regions (e.g., Florida). Such a divergent pattern was mainly attributable to its high sensitivity to chilling insufficiency, where the advancing effect on SOS was only triggered on the premise that chilling days exceeded a certain threshold. Other mechanisms may also play a part, such as the interplay among chilling, forcing and photoperiod and the difference in species life strategies. Besides, urban areas and natural ecosystems were found to suffer from similar magnitudes of influence from ALAN, albeit with a much higher baseline ALAN intensity in urban areas. Our findings shed new light on the phenological impact of ALAN and its relation to space and other environmental cues, which is beneficial to a better understanding and projection of phenology changes under a warming and urbanizing future.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3332
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Author Ishikawa, R.; Shinomura, T.; Takano, M.; Shimamoto, K.
Title Phytochrome dependent quantitative control of Hd3a transcription is the basis of the night break effect in rice flowering Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Genes & Genetic Systems Abbreviated Journal Genes Genet Syst
Volume 84 Issue 2 Pages 179-184
Keywords Plants; Flowers/*genetics/growth & development; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/drug effects; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant/drug effects; Light; Mutation; Oryza/*genetics/growth & development; Photoperiod; Phytochrome B/genetics/*physiology; Plant Proteins/*genetics; Transcription, Genetic
Abstract A short exposure to light during relative night (night break; NB) delays flowering in the short day plant rice. NB acts by downregulating Heading date 3a (Hd3a) expression. Because phytochrome B mutants do not respond to NB and their flowering time is not affected even under NB conditions, phyB is required for the suppression of Hd3a expression. The effect of NB is quantitatively controlled by light quality and by either light intensity or duration. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate these interactions are poorly understood. Here, we examine the roles of phytochromes in the regulation of Hd3a transcription under NB conditions using monochromatic red, far-red and blue light. Red and blue light downregulated Hd3a expression, but far-red light NB did not. The effect of red light NB on Hd3a is dependent on photon fluence and is restored by subsequent far-red light irradiation. Our results suggest that quantitative effect of light on flowering in rice NB is mediated by the regulation of Hd3a transcription by phyB.
Address Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Takayama, Ikoma, Japan
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Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1341-7568 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19556711 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3345
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Author Bennie, J.; Davies, T.W.; Cruse, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Cascading effects of artificial light at night: resource-mediated control of herbivores in a grassland ecosystem Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 2015 Issue Pages 20140131
Keywords Ecology; light pollution; photopollution; artificial light at night; biotic interactions; community-level; bottom-up effects; grasslands; herbivores; invertebrates; pea aphid; Acyrthosiphon pisum; plants; insects
Abstract Artificial light at night has a wide range of biological effects on both plants and animals. Here, we review mechanisms by which artificial light at night may restructure ecological communities by modifying the interactions between species. Such mechanisms may be top-down (predator, parasite or grazer controlled), bottom-up (resource-controlled) or involve non-trophic processes, such as pollination, seed dispersal or competition. We present results from an experiment investigating both top-down and bottom-up effects of artificial light at night on the population density of pea aphids Acyrthosiphon pisum in a diverse artificial grassland community in the presence and absence of predators and under low-level light of different spectral composition. We found no evidence for top-down control of A. pisum in this system, but did find evidence for bottom-up effects mediated through the impact of light on flower head density in a leguminous food plant. These results suggest that physiological effects of light on a plant species within a diverse plant community can have detectable demographic effects on a specialist herbivore.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn TR10 9FE, UK; k.j.gaston@exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language (up) English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1128
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