toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Matsuda, R.; Yamano, T.; Murakami, K.; Fujiwara, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of spectral distribution and photosynthetic photon flux density for overnight LED light irradiation on tomato seedling growth and leaf injury Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientia Horticulturae Abbreviated Journal Scientia Horticulturae  
  Volume 198 Issue Pages 363-369  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0304-4238 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1387  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Matzke, E. B. url  openurl
  Title The Effect of Street Lights in Delaying Leaf-Fall in Certain Trees Type Journal Article
  Year 1936 Publication American Journal of Botany Abbreviated Journal Amer. J. of Botany  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 446-452  
  Keywords Plants; trees; Carolina poplar; Populus canadensis; London plane; Platanus acerifolia; sycamore; Platanus occidentalis; crack willow; Salix fragilis; New York; New York City  
  Abstract Street lights in the City of New York cause a retention of the leaves of certain trees: Carolina poplar (Populus canadensis), London plane (Platanus acerifolia), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), and crack willow (Salix fragilis). Illuminated portions of a tree retain their leaves; shaded portions of the same tree do not. One side of a tree, or the lower part, may thus have numerous leaves, while the other side, and the upper part, may be entirely devoid of foliage. A relatively weak light, at a distance of as much as 45 feet from the tip of the nearest branch, may cause retention of numerous leaves. Light intensity as low as 1 foot candle, or less, may be effective. Some leaves may be retained at least a month, others more than that, beyond the normal season. The orientation of the light with respect to the tree – i.e., north, east, south, and west – is not significant. In Populus canadensis all of the leaves ultimately fall, abscission apparently taking place at the base of the petiole. In Platanus acerifolia and Platanus occidentalis some of the leaves are retained until killed by low temperature; then some of them break off above the base of the petiole. Leaves of the Populus and Platanus species discussed remain green unusually long when receiving additional illumination. Leaves of these same trees do not emerge from the buds earlier in the spring as a result of the additional illumination.  
  Address n/a  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher JSTOR Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9122 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1394  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Ben-Attia, M.; Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Gadacha, W.; Khedaier, A.; Sani, M.; Touitou, Y.; Boughamni, N.G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Blooming rhythms of cactus Cereus peruvianus with nocturnal peak at full moon during seasons of prolonged daytime photoperiod Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 4 Pages 419-430  
  Keywords Plants; Moonlight  
  Abstract Cereus peruvianus (Peruvian apple cactus) is a large erect and thorny succulent cactus characterized by column-like (cereus [L]: column), that is, candle-shaped, appendages. For three successive years (1100 days), between early April and late November, we studied the flowering patterns of eight cacti growing in public gardens and rural areas of north and central Tunisia, far from nighttime artificial illumination, in relation to natural environmental light, temperature, relative humidity and precipitation parameters. Flower blooming was assessed nightly between 23:00 h and until at least 02:00 h, and additionally around-the-clock at ~1 h intervals for 30 consecutive days during the late summer of each year of study to quantify both nyctohemeral (day-night) and lunar patterns. During the summer months of prolonged daytime photoperiod, flower blooming of C. peruvianus exhibited predictable-in-time variation as “waves” with average period of 29.5 days synchronized by the light of the full moon. The large-sized flower (~16 cm diameter) opens almost exclusively at night, between sunset and sunrise, as a 24 h rhythm during a specific 3-4-day span of the lunar cycle (full moon), with a strong correlation between moon phase and number and proportion of flowers in bloom (ranging from r = +0.59 to +0.91). Black, blue and red cotton sheets were used to filter specific spectral bands of nighttime moonlight from illuminating randomly selected plant appendages as a means to test the hypothesis of a “gating” 24 h rhythm phenomenon of photoreceptors at the bud level. Relative to control conditions (no light filtering), black sheet covering inhibited flower bud induction by 87.5%, red sheet covering by 46.6% and blue sheet covering by 34%, and the respective inhibiting effects on number of flowers in bloom were essentially 100%, ~81% and ~44%. C. peruvianus is a unique example of a terrestrial plant that exhibits a circadian flowering rhythm (peak ~00:00 h) “gated” by 24 h, lunar 29.5-day (bright light of full moon) and annual 365.25-day (prolonged summertime day length) environmental photoperiod cycles.  
  Address e Departement des Sciences de la Vie, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte , Universite de Carthage , Zarzouna , Tunisie  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27030087 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1411  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, J.D.; Goodspeed, D.; Sheng, Z.; Li, B.; Yang, Y.; Kliebenstein, D.J.; Braam, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Keeping the rhythm: light/dark cycles during postharvest storage preserve the tissue integrity and nutritional content of leafy plants Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol  
  Volume 15 Issue Pages 92  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The modular body structure of plants enables detached plant organs, such as postharvest fruits and vegetables, to maintain active responsiveness to environmental stimuli, including daily cycles of light and darkness. Twenty-four hour light/darkness cycles entrain plant circadian clock rhythms, which provide advantage to plants. Here, we tested whether green leafy vegetables gain longevity advantage by being stored under light/dark cycles designed to maintain biological rhythms. RESULTS: Light/dark cycles during postharvest storage improved several aspects of plant tissue performance comparable to that provided by refrigeration. Tissue integrity, green coloration, and chlorophyll content were generally enhanced by cycling of light and darkness compared to constant light or darkness during storage. In addition, the levels of the phytonutrient glucosinolates in kale and cabbage remained at higher levels over time when the leaf tissue was stored under light/dark cycles. CONCLUSIONS: Maintenance of the daily cycling of light and dark periods during postharvest storage may slow the decline of plant tissues, such as green leafy vegetables, improving not only appearance but also the health value of the crops through the maintenance of chlorophyll and phytochemical content after harvest.  
  Address Department of BioSciences, Rice University, Houston, TX, 77005, USA. braam@rice.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:25879637; PMCID:PMC4396971 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1458  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Touitou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 465-479  
  Keywords Moonlight; Commentary; Animals; Plants; Human Health  
  Abstract Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency.  
  Address a Unite de Chronobiologie , Fondation A de Rothschild , Paris cedex 19 , France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language (up) Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27019304 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1460  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: