|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Clark, N.A.
Title (up) The Rate of Reproduction of Lemna Major as a Function of Intensity and Duration of Light Type Journal Article
Year 1924 Publication The Journal of Physical Chemistry Abbreviated Journal J. Phys. Chem.
Volume 29 Issue 8 Pages 935-941
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0092-7325 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2374
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Moore, B.
Title (up) The Relative Length of Day and Night Type Journal Article
Year 1920 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 3 Pages 234-237
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2407
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author PENG, Y., ZHANG, H., GUO, K., DING, Y., WANG, X.
Title (up) The Safe Distance Between Road Lighting Fixtures and Street Trees. Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Landscape Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 2 Pages 41-43
Keywords Plants; Planning
Abstract The road lighting system and the road greening system, which are mutually interrelated and independent, are two important parts in the urban road environment Unreasonable road lighting is easy to induce light pollution and has a great negative impact on the physiology and growth of garden plants in the urban green space. In this paper; 21 kinds of common tree species in the urban green space of Zhengzhou were selected as the research object, and the photosynthetic physiological parameters of landscape trees under the TKD light source were observed using LI-6400 Photosynthesis System. This paper attempted to find the critical point for initiating photosynthesis of different types of tree species under a certain light source and then calculated the safe distance between lighting fixtures and landscape trees. The results showed that road lighting interfered with the photosynthetic physiological activities of the surveyed trees, affecting the normal dormancy of the plants at night; the sensitivity of different tree species to night lighting was different, and there were some differences in the light compensation points, so the corresponding safe distance was also different It is hoped that this study can provide a valuable reference and scientific basis for urban toad greening and lighting design.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2648
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Patel, J.S.; Radetsky, L.; Rea, M.S.
Title (up) The Value of Red Light at Night for Increasing Basil Yield Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Canadian Journal of Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Plant Sci.
Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages 1321-1330
Keywords Plants
Abstract Sweet basil (<i>Ocimum basilicum L.</i>) is primarily used for culinary purposes, but it is also used in the fragrance and medicinal industries. In the last few years, global sweet basil production has been significantly impacted by downy mildew caused by <i>Peronospora belbahrii</i>. Nighttime exposure to red light has been shown to inhibit sporulation of <i>P. belbahrii</i>. The objective of this study was to determine if nighttime exposure to red light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ<sub>max</sub> = 625 nm) could increase plant growth (plant height and leaf size) and yield (number and weight of leaves) in basil plants. In two sets of greenhouse experiments, red light was applied at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 µmol m<sup>-2</sup> s<sup>-1</sup> during the otherwise dark night for 10 hours (from 20:00 to 06:00). The results demonstrate that exposure to red light at night can increase the number of basil leaves per plant, plant height, leaf size (length and width), and leaf fresh and dry weight, compared to plants in darkness at night. The addition of incremental red light at night has the potential to be cost-effective for fresh organic basil production in controlled environments.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0008-4220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1955
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dzakovich, M.; Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.
Title (up) Tomatoes Grown with Light-emitting Diodes or High-pressure Sodium Supplemental Lights have Similar Fruit-quality Attributes Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal HortScience
Volume 50 Issue 10 Pages 1498-1502
Keywords Plants; greenhouse tomato production; HPS; LED; physicochemical testing; sensory panels; Solanum lycopersium; tomato; high-pressure sodium; agriculture; horticulture; light-emitting diode
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an attractive alternative to high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps for plant growth because of their energy-saving potential. However, the effects of supplementing broad-waveband solar light with narrow-waveband LED light on the sensory attributes of greenhouse-grown tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) are largely unknown. Three separate studies investigating the effect of supplemental light quantity and quality on physicochemical and organoleptic properties of greenhouse-grown tomato fruit were conducted over 4- or 5-month intervals during 2012 and 2013. Tomato cultivars Success, Komeett, and Rebelski were grown hydroponically within a high-wire trellising system in a glass-glazed greenhouse. Chromacity, Brix, titratable acidity, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH measurements of fruit extracts indicated plant response differences between lighting treatments. In sensory panels, tasters ranked tomatoes for color, acidity, and sweetness using an objective scale, whereas color, aroma, texture, sweetness, acidity, aftertaste, and overall approval were ranked using hedonic scales. By collecting both physicochemical as well as sensory data, this study was able to determine whether statistically significant physicochemical parameters of tomato fruit also reflected consumer perception of fruit quality. Sensory panels indicated that statistically significant physicochemical differences were not noticeable to tasters and that tasters engaged in blind testing could not discern between tomatoes from different supplemental lighting treatments or unsupplemented controls. Growers interested in reducing supplemental lighting energy consumption by using intracanopy LED (IC-LED) supplemental lighting need not be concerned that the quality of their tomato fruits will be negatively affected by narrow-band supplemental radiation at the intensities and wavelengths used in this study.
Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0018-5345 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1301
Permanent link to this record