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Author Chaves, I.; Pokorny, R.; Byrdin, M.; Hoang, N.; Ritz, T.; Brettel, K.; Essen, L.-O.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Batschauer, A.; Ahmad, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) The cryptochromes: blue light photoreceptors in plants and animals Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Annual Review of Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal Annu Rev Plant Biol  
  Volume 62 Issue Pages 335-364  
  Keywords Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism; Animals; Cryptochromes/chemistry/classification/*physiology; DNA Repair; Deoxyribodipyrimidine Photo-Lyase/chemistry/classification/physiology; Homing Behavior; Insects/physiology; *Light Signal Transduction; Magnetics; Mice; Oxidation-Reduction; Phosphorylation/physiology; Plants/*metabolism; blue light  
  Abstract Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors first identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, where they play key roles in growth and development. Subsequently identified in prokaryotes, archaea, and many eukaryotes, cryptochromes function in the animal circadian clock and are proposed as magnetoreceptors in migratory birds. Cryptochromes are closely structurally related to photolyases, evolutionarily ancient flavoproteins that catalyze light-dependent DNA repair. Here, we review the structural, photochemical, and molecular properties of cry-DASH, plant, and animal cryptochromes in relation to biological signaling mechanisms and uncover common features that may contribute to better understanding the function of cryptochromes in diverse systems including in man.  
  Address Department of Genetics, Erasmus University Medical Center, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands. i.chaves@erasmusmc.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1543-5008 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21526969 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 341  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Caffarra, A.; Donnelly, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) The ecological significance of phenology in four different tree species: effects of light and temperature on bud burst Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Biometeorology Abbreviated Journal Int J Biometeorol  
  Volume 55 Issue 5 Pages 711-721  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract The process of adaptation is the result of stabilising selection caused by two opposite forces: protection against an unfavourable season (survival adaptation), and effective use of growing resources (capacity adaptation). As plant species have evolved different life strategies based on different trade offs between survival and capacity adaptations, different phenological responses are also expected among species. The aim of this study was to compare budburst responses of two opportunistic species (Betula pubescens, and Salix x smithiana) with that of two long-lived, late successional species (Fagus sylvatica and Tilia cordata) and consider their ecological significance. Thus, we performed a series of experiments whereby temperature and photoperiod were manipulated during dormancy. T. cordata and F. sylvatica showed low rates of budburst, high chilling requirements and responsiveness to light intensity, while B. pubescens and S. x smithiana had high rates of budburst, low chilling requirements and were not affected by light intensity. In addition, budburst in B. pubescens and S. x smithiana was more responsive to high forcing temperatures than in T. cordata and F. sylvatica. These results suggest that the timing of growth onset in B. pubescens and S. x smithiana (opportunistic) is regulated through a less conservative mechanism than in T. cordata and F. sylvatica (long-lived, late successional), and that these species trade a higher risk of frost damage for the opportunity of vigorous growth at the beginning of spring, before canopy closure. This information should be considered when assessing the impacts of climate change on vegetation or developing phenological models.  
  Address Department of Botany, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. amelia.caffarra@gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0020-7128 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21113629 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1675  
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Author Matzke, E. B. url  openurl
  Title (up) The Effect of Street Lights in Delaying Leaf-Fall in Certain Trees Type Journal Article
  Year 1936 Publication American Journal of Botany Abbreviated Journal Amer. J. of Botany  
  Volume 23 Issue 6 Pages 446-452  
  Keywords Plants; trees; Carolina poplar; Populus canadensis; London plane; Platanus acerifolia; sycamore; Platanus occidentalis; crack willow; Salix fragilis; New York; New York City  
  Abstract Street lights in the City of New York cause a retention of the leaves of certain trees: Carolina poplar (Populus canadensis), London plane (Platanus acerifolia), sycamore (Platanus occidentalis), and crack willow (Salix fragilis). Illuminated portions of a tree retain their leaves; shaded portions of the same tree do not. One side of a tree, or the lower part, may thus have numerous leaves, while the other side, and the upper part, may be entirely devoid of foliage. A relatively weak light, at a distance of as much as 45 feet from the tip of the nearest branch, may cause retention of numerous leaves. Light intensity as low as 1 foot candle, or less, may be effective. Some leaves may be retained at least a month, others more than that, beyond the normal season. The orientation of the light with respect to the tree – i.e., north, east, south, and west – is not significant. In Populus canadensis all of the leaves ultimately fall, abscission apparently taking place at the base of the petiole. In Platanus acerifolia and Platanus occidentalis some of the leaves are retained until killed by low temperature; then some of them break off above the base of the petiole. Leaves of the Populus and Platanus species discussed remain green unusually long when receiving additional illumination. Leaves of these same trees do not emerge from the buds earlier in the spring as a result of the additional illumination.  
  Address n/a  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher JSTOR Place of Publication Editor  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0002-9122 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1394  
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Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title (up) The Effect on Certain Plants of altering the Daily Period of Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1923 Publication Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 37 Issue 145 Pages 75-94  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2406  
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Author Eng, R.Y.N.; Tsujita, M.J.; Grodzinski, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) The effects of supplementary HPS lighting and carbon dioxide enrichment on the vegetative growth, nutritional status and flowering characteristics ofChrysanthemum morifoliumRamat Type Journal Article
  Year 1985 Publication Journal of Horticultural Science Abbreviated Journal Journal of Horticultural Science  
  Volume 60 Issue 3 Pages 389-395  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Supplementary high pressure sodium (HPS) lighting (140 µmol m−2s−1) and CO2 enrichment (1375 µl l−1) improved the vegetative growth of Chrysanthemum morifolium cv Dramatic by increases in stem length, stem diameter, root weight ratio, dry weight, relative growth and net assimilation rates. Three-week-old chrysanthemums grown under CO2 enrichment and HPS lighting had lower leaf weight and stem weight ratios as well as lower foliar nutrient content than those grown under ambient CO2 and natural light. Plants grown on to maturity under CO2 enrichment and supplementary HPS lighting had the longest stem lengths, the most flowers and greatest increase in dry weight. The combination of both additional light and CO2 was superior to either factor used alone. With 24 h HPS supplementary lighting CO2 enrichment was most effective in improving vegetative growth and flower quality when applied during the daytime. Night CO2 enrichment was not commercially beneficial at the light levels employed in this study.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-1589 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2373  
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