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Author Adams, J. url  openurl
  Title The Effect on Certain Plants of altering the Daily Period of Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1923 Publication Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 37 Issue 145 Pages 75-94  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
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  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2406  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Karling, J.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A Preliminary Account of the Influence of Light and Temperature on Growth and Reproduction in Chara fragilis Type Journal Article
  Year 1924 Publication Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club Abbreviated Journal Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club  
  Volume 51 Issue 12 Pages 469  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0040-9618 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2404  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wambrauw, D.Z.K.; Kashiwatani, T.; Komura, A.; Hasegawa, H.; Narita, K.; Oku, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Honda, K.; Maeda, omoo url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of Supplemental Light on the Quality of Green Asparagus Spears in Winter ‘Fusekomi’ Forcing Culture Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal Environmental Control in Biology  
  Volume 54 Issue 3 Pages 147-152  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture of asparagus is becoming popular in Japan because the method can make production of asparagus possible during cold season. However, there are some problems such as color of the spear is pale, and rutin content is lower compared to spring harvest due to the low light intensity, especially in the production area which has much snow and short sunshine. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of supplemental lighting on the yield, rutin content, sugar component (fructose, glucose, sucrose), and the color of spears. The experiments were conducted by using different irradiation time and different numbers of fluorescent lamps hanging on the tunnel poles over the cultivation bed on the winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture. Compared to the control, rutin content was significantly increased under supplemental lighting plots. No significant difference or negative impact was observed in sugar contents and yield on each plot. Moreover, spear color also appeared to be better under supplemental lighting than that of the control. These results suggested that supplemental lighting was effective to improve the quality of asparagus spears (such as rutin contents, spears color), especially for the production area that has low light intensity or in short day conditions.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1493  
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Author Maggi, E.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Trophic compensation stabilizes marine primary producers exposed to artificial light at night Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 606 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Plants; Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread phenomenon along coastal areas. Despite increasing evidence of pervasive effects of ALAN on patterns of species distribution and abundance, the potential of this emerging threat to alter ecological processes in marine ecosystems has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show how exposure to white LED lighting, comparable to that experienced along local urbanized coasts, significantly enhanced the impact of grazing gastropods on epilithic microphytobenthos (MPB). ALAN increased both the photosynthetic biomass of MPB and the grazing pressure of gastropods, such that consumers compensated for the positive effect of night lighting on primary producers. Our results indicate that trophic interactions can provide a stabilizing compensatory mechanism against ALAN effects in natural food webs.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2063  
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Author Lawrence, B.K.; Fehr, W.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Reproductive Response of Soybeans to Night Interruption1 Type Journal Article
  Year 1981 Publication Crop Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 755  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Artificial lights may be used to delay flowering of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. Previous research has suggested that night interruption imposed every other night would delay flowering as much as every-night interruption. Our objective was to evaluate the reproductive development of cultivars when exposed to night interruption every night compared with exposure every other night. One cultivar of each Maturity Group 00 through V was grown in the field at Ames, Iowa during 1978 and 1979. The four light treatments imposed every night or every other night included illumination with incandescent light from sunset to sunrise, 2300 to 0030 hours, 0030 to 0200 hours, or 0200 to 0330 hours. Control plots were not exposed to artificial light.

The average number of days that reproductive development was delayed beyond the control was twice as great for the every-night treatments as for the every-other-night treatments. Illumination from sunset to sunrise delayed reproductive development significantly more than the treatments of night interruption for 1.5 hours. Night interruption near the end of the dark period (0200 to 0330 hours) delayed reproductive development more than the earlier interruptions.

The results did not support the hypothesis that light treatments every other night would delay reproductive development as much as every-night interruptions. The lighting regime needed to delay reproductive development will depend on the photoperiod requirements of the cultivars and duration of the delay that is desired.
 
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0011-183X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2367  
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