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Author Buchar, J.; Thaler, K. openurl 
  Title Ãœber Pardosa atomaria (C .L. KOCH) und andere Pardosa-Arten an Geröllüfern in Süd- und Mitteleuropa. Type Journal Article
  Year 2002 Publication Linzer Biologischer Beitrag Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 445–465  
  Keywords Plants  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 659  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Borges, R.M. openurl 
  Title Dark Matters: Challenges of Nocturnal Communication Between Plants and Animals in Delivery of Pollination Services Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 91 Issue 1 Pages 33-42  
  Keywords Plants; Animals  
  Abstract The night is a special niche characterized by dim light, lower temperatures, and higher humidity compared to the day. Several animals have made the transition from the day into the night and have acquired unique adaptations to cope with the challenges of performing nocturnal activities. Several plant species have opted to bloom at night, possibly as a response to aridity to prevent excessive water loss through evapotranspiration since flowering is often a water-demanding process, or to protect pollen from heat stress. Nocturnal pollinators have visual adaptations to function under dim light conditions but may also trade off vision against olfaction when they are dependent on nectar-rewarding and scented flowers. Nocturnal pollinators may use CO2 and humidity cues emanating from freshly-opened flowers as indicators of nectar-rich resources. Some endothermic nocturnal insect pollinators are attracted to thermogenic flowers within which they remain to obtain heat as a reward to increase their energy budget. This review focuses on mechanisms that pollinators use to find flowers at night, and the signals that nocturnally blooming flowers may employ to attract pollinators under dim light conditions. It also indicates gaps in our knowledge. While millions of years of evolutionary time have given pollinators and plants solutions to the delivery of pollination services and to the offering of appropriate rewards, this history of successful evolution is being threatened by artificial light at night. Excessive and inappropriate illumination associated with anthropogenic activities has resulted in significant light pollution which serves to undermine life processes governed by dim light.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1832  
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Author Palmer M; Gibbons R; Bhagavathula R; Holshouser D; Davidson D openurl 
  Title Roadway lighting's impact on altering soybean growth: Volume 1 Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Illinois Center for Transportation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Research Report No. FHWA - ICT - 17 - 010 Issue Pages  
  Keywords plants; Lighting  
  Abstract The impact of roadway lighting on soybean plant growth and development was measured in situ at seven locations in the state of Illinois. The plant data collection included periodic height, reproductive stage, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), as well as plant moisture content and dried seed weight after harvest. The periodic measurements were made at the same locations over time to determine delays in plant development. The impact of roadway lighting trespass was significant and measurable above thresholds of both horizontal and vertical illuminance as well as a combination of the two. A specification was drafted to minimize the impact of roadway lighting trespass on the soybean, and countermeasures were recommended to control the impact of lighting on the soybean.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1943  
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Author Arnott, J. T. url  openurl
  Title Growth Response of White and Englemann Spruce Seedlings to Extended Photoperiod Using Three Light Intensities Type Report
  Year 1982 Publication Technical Report: Pacific Forestry Centre Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Four seedlots of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and three of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry), covering a range of 10 degrees of latitude and a range of altitudes, were sown in BC/ CFS Styroblocks and grown in a heated greenhouse and an unheated shadehouse, using incandescent light to provide a 19-h photoperiod. Four intensities of lighting were used: 0, 100,200, and 400 Ix. A second experiment with the same seedlots was conducted in growth rooms that were programmed to evaluate the effect of low night temperature on seedling shoot growth when the photoperiod was extended to 19 h, using a light intensity of 200 Ix.

Shoot length of white and Engelmann spruce seedlings grown under an extended daylength of 100 Ix were significantly taller than the control (0 Ix). There were no significant differences in shoot length or weight among the three intensities of light used to extend the photoperiod for all seedlots except the southern latitude-low elevation population of Engelmann spruce. The more northern populations of white spruce and the high altitude populations of Engelmann spruce did not require light intensities higher than 100 Ix to maintain apical growth. Low night temperature (7°C) did produce significantly smaller seedlings than the warm night (1SoC) regime. However, terminal resting buds of seedlings grown under the cool night regime did not form any sooner than on those seedlings grown under warm nights.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2372  
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages e02550  
  Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174  
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