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Author Wambrauw, D.Z.K.; Kashiwatani, T.; Komura, A.; Hasegawa, H.; Narita, K.; Oku, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Honda, K.; Maeda, omoo
Title Effect of Supplemental Light on the Quality of Green Asparagus Spears in Winter ‘Fusekomi’ Forcing Culture Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Environment Control in Biology Abbreviated Journal Environmental Control in Biology
Volume (down) 54 Issue 3 Pages 147-152
Keywords Plants
Abstract Winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture of asparagus is becoming popular in Japan because the method can make production of asparagus possible during cold season. However, there are some problems such as color of the spear is pale, and rutin content is lower compared to spring harvest due to the low light intensity, especially in the production area which has much snow and short sunshine. The objective of this study was to clarify the effect of supplemental lighting on the yield, rutin content, sugar component (fructose, glucose, sucrose), and the color of spears. The experiments were conducted by using different irradiation time and different numbers of fluorescent lamps hanging on the tunnel poles over the cultivation bed on the winter ‘fusekomi’ forcing culture. Compared to the control, rutin content was significantly increased under supplemental lighting plots. No significant difference or negative impact was observed in sugar contents and yield on each plot. Moreover, spear color also appeared to be better under supplemental lighting than that of the control. These results suggested that supplemental lighting was effective to improve the quality of asparagus spears (such as rutin contents, spears color), especially for the production area that has low light intensity or in short day conditions.
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ISSN 1880-554X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1493
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Author Owen, W. G., & Lopez, R. G.
Title Comparison of Sole-source and Supplemental Lighting on Callus Formation and Initial Rhizogenesis of Gaura and Salvia Cuttings Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 54 Issue 4 Pages 684-691
Keywords Plants
Abstract Variability in outdoor daily temperatures and photosynthetic daily light integrals (DLIs) from early spring to late fall limits the ability of propagators to accurately control propagation environments to consistently callus, root, and yield compact herbaceous perennial rooted liners. We evaluated and compared the effects of sole-source lighting (SSL) delivered from red (R) and blue (B) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to supplemental lighting (SL) provided by high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on herbaceous perennial cutting morphology, physiology, and growth during callusing and initial rhizogenesis. Cuttings of perennial sage (Salvia nemorosa L. ‘Lyrical Blues’) and wand flower (Gaura lindheimeri Engelm. and A. Gray ‘Siskiyou Pink’) were propagated in a walk-in growth chamber under multilayer SSL provided by LEDs with [R (660 nm)]:[B (460 nm)] light ratios (%) of 100:0 (R100:B0), 75:25 (R75:B25), 50:50 (R50:B50), or 0:100 (R0:B100) delivering 60 µmol·m−2·s–1 for 16 hours (total DLI of 3.4 mol·m−2·d−1). In a glass-glazed greenhouse (GH control), cuttings were propagated under ambient solar light and day-extension SL provided by HPS lamps delivering 40 µmol·m−2·s–1 to provide a 16-hour photoperiod (total DLI of 3.3 mol·m−2·d−1). At 10 days after sticking cuttings, callus diameter and rooting percentage were similar among all light-quality treatments. For instance, callus diameter, a measure of growth, of wand flower cuttings increased from an average 1.7 mm at stick (0 day) to a range of 2.7 to 2.9 mm at 10 days after sticking, regardless of lighting treatment. Relative leaf chlorophyll content was generally greater under SSL R75:B25 or R50:B50 than all other light-quality treatments. However, stem length of perennial sage and wand flower cuttings propagated under SSL R50:B50 at 10 days were 21% and 30% shorter and resulted in 50% and 8% greater root biomass, respectively, compared with those under SL. The herbaceous perennial cuttings propagated in this study under SSL R50:B50 were of similar quality or more compact compared with those under SL, indicating that callus induction and initial rooting can occur under LEDs in a multilayer SSL propagation system.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2346
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Author Woolsey, S.; Capelli, F.; Gonser, T.; Hoehn, E.; Hostmann, M.; Junker, B.; Paetzold, A.; Roulier, C.; Schweizer, S.; Tiegs, S.D.; Tockner, K.; Weber, C.; Peter, A.
Title A strategy to assess river restoration success Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshwater Biol
Volume (down) 52 Issue 4 Pages 752-769
Keywords Plants; evaluation guidelines; socio-economics; indicators; floodplain; decision making; bioassessment; sustainability; biodiversity
Abstract 1. Elaborate restoration attempts are underway worldwide to return human-impacted rivers to more natural conditions. Assessing the outcome of river restoration projects is vital for adaptive management, evaluating project efficiency, optimising future programmes and gaining public acceptance. An important reason why assessment is often omitted is lack of appropriate guidelines.

2. Here we present guidelines for assessing river restoration success. They are based on a total of 49 indicators and 13 specific objectives elaborated for the restoration of low- to mid-order rivers in Switzerland. Most of these objectives relate to ecological attributes of rivers, but socio-economic aspects are also considered.

3. A strategy is proposed according to which a set of indicators is selected from the total of 49 indicators to ensure that indicators match restoration objectives and measures, and that the required effort for survey and analysis of indicators is appropriate to the project budget.

4. Indicator values are determined according to methods described in detailed method sheets. Restoration success is evaluated by comparing indicator values before and after restoration measures have been undertaken. To this end, values are first standardised on a dimensionless scale ranging from 0 to 1, then averaged across different indicators for a given project objective, and finally assigned to one of five overall success categories.

5. To illustrate the application of this scheme, a case study on the Thur River, Switzerland, is presented. Seven indicators were selected to meet a total of five project objectives. The project was successful in achieving ‘provision of high recreational value’, ‘lateral connectivity’ and ‘vertical connectivity’ but failed to meet the objectives ‘morphological and hydraulic variability’ and ‘near natural abundance and diversity of fauna’. Results from this assessment allowed us to identify potential deficits and gaps in the restoration project. To gain information on the sensitivity of the assessment scheme would require a set of complementary indicators for each restoration objective.
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ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 662
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Author Karling, J.S.
Title A Preliminary Account of the Influence of Light and Temperature on Growth and Reproduction in Chara fragilis Type Journal Article
Year 1924 Publication Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club Abbreviated Journal Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club
Volume (down) 51 Issue 12 Pages 469
Keywords Plants
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0040-9618 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2404
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Author Dzakovich, M.; Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.
Title Tomatoes Grown with Light-emitting Diodes or High-pressure Sodium Supplemental Lights have Similar Fruit-quality Attributes Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal HortScience
Volume (down) 50 Issue 10 Pages 1498-1502
Keywords Plants; greenhouse tomato production; HPS; LED; physicochemical testing; sensory panels; Solanum lycopersium; tomato; high-pressure sodium; agriculture; horticulture; light-emitting diode
Abstract Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are an attractive alternative to high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps for plant growth because of their energy-saving potential. However, the effects of supplementing broad-waveband solar light with narrow-waveband LED light on the sensory attributes of greenhouse-grown tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum) are largely unknown. Three separate studies investigating the effect of supplemental light quantity and quality on physicochemical and organoleptic properties of greenhouse-grown tomato fruit were conducted over 4- or 5-month intervals during 2012 and 2013. Tomato cultivars Success, Komeett, and Rebelski were grown hydroponically within a high-wire trellising system in a glass-glazed greenhouse. Chromacity, Brix, titratable acidity, electrical conductivity (EC), and pH measurements of fruit extracts indicated plant response differences between lighting treatments. In sensory panels, tasters ranked tomatoes for color, acidity, and sweetness using an objective scale, whereas color, aroma, texture, sweetness, acidity, aftertaste, and overall approval were ranked using hedonic scales. By collecting both physicochemical as well as sensory data, this study was able to determine whether statistically significant physicochemical parameters of tomato fruit also reflected consumer perception of fruit quality. Sensory panels indicated that statistically significant physicochemical differences were not noticeable to tasters and that tasters engaged in blind testing could not discern between tomatoes from different supplemental lighting treatments or unsupplemented controls. Growers interested in reducing supplemental lighting energy consumption by using intracanopy LED (IC-LED) supplemental lighting need not be concerned that the quality of their tomato fruits will be negatively affected by narrow-band supplemental radiation at the intensities and wavelengths used in this study.
Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0018-5345 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1301
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