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Author Buchar, J.; Thaler, K.
Title Über Pardosa atomaria (C .L. KOCH) und andere Pardosa-Arten an Geröllüfern in Süd- und Mitteleuropa. Type Journal Article
Year 2002 Publication Linzer Biologischer Beitrag Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 445–465
Keywords Plants
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 659
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Author Kirschey, T.; Meisel, J.
Title Augen in der Landschaft Seen und Stillgewässer Nordostdeutschlands. Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Naturmagazin Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 4-11
Keywords Plants
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 661
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Author Chen, C. L.; Su, Y. H.; Liu, C.J.; Lee, Y.C.
Title Effect of Night Illumination on Growth and Yield of Soybean Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Journal of Taiwan Agricultural Research Abbreviated Journal J. of Taiwan Agricultural Res.
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Plants; soybeans; Taiwan
Abstract To evaluate the potential of soybean as a crop for bio-fuel in Taiwan, field experiments were conducted in 2006 across the island, using an Australian variety ‘Leichardt’. This study was one of the field experiments at Hemei Township, Changhua County. Soybean was seeded by hand-spreading in the fall of 2006 and harvested in 2007. Results showed that seeding of soybean by hand-spreading affected uniformity of seed germination and caused high variations in yield in this field. Seed yield of soybean reached 770 kg ha-1 under good pest management and disease control. The study also showed that night illumination is an important factor affecting growth and yield of soybean. Plants growing near the roadside (within 10–20 m) were exposed to the night light, resulting in prolonged vegetative growth and delayed blossom period for about 1 to 4 weeks. Therefore, such plants suffered from poor pod filling due to low temperature stress at reproduction stage and delayed the harvest period for about 6 weeks. Nevertheless, seed yield of soybean plants exposed to the night illumination reached 1000 kg ha-1, which was slightly higher than soybean plants without exposuring to the night illumination.
Address chiling(at)tari.gov.tw
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Publisher Taiwan Agricultural Research Institute Place of Publication Editor
Language Chinese Summary Language English Original Title
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1395
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Author Schroer, S.; Hölker, F.
Title Impact of Lighting on Flora and Fauna Type Book Chapter
Year 2016 Publication Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 1-33
Keywords Ecology; Lighting; Artificial light at night; ALAN; Plants; Animals; review
Abstract Technology, especially artificial light at night (ALAN), often has unexpected impacts on the environment. This chapter addresses both the perception of light by various organisms and the impact of ALAN on flora and fauna. The responses to ALAN are subdivided into the effects of light intensity, color spectra, and duration and timing of illumination. The ways organisms perceive light can be as variable as the habitats they live in. ALAN often interferes with natural light information. It is rarely neutral and has significant impacts beyond human perception. For example, UV light reflection of generative plant parts or the direction of light is used by many organisms as information for foraging, finding spawning sites, or communication. Contemporary outdoor lighting often lacks sustainable planning, even though the protection of species, habitat, and human well-being could be improved by adopting simple technical measures. The increasing use of ALAN with high intensities in the blue part of the spectrum, e.g., fluorescent light and LEDs, is discussed as a critical trend. Blue light is a major circadian signal in higher vertebrates and can substantially impact the orientation of organisms such as numerous insect species. A better understanding of how various types and sources of artificial light, and how organisms perceive ALAN, will be an important step towards more sustainable lighting. Such knowledge is the basis for sustainable lighting planning and the development of solutions to protect biodiversity from the effects of outdoor lighting. Maps that describe the rapid changes in ALAN are urgently needed. In addition, measures are required to reduce the increasing use and intensity of ALAN in more remote areas as signaling thresholds in flora and fauna at night are often close to moonlight intensity and far below streetlight levels.
Address Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Müggelseedamm 310, 12587, Berlin, Germany; schroer(at)igb-berlin.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN 978-3-319-00295-8 Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1470
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Author Chang, C., Chang, K., & Fu, W.
Title Testing of Various Monochromatic LED Lights Used in Supplemental Irradiation of Lettuce in Modern urban Rooftop Polytunnels Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Applied Engineering in Agriculture Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Urban farming could provide both vegetable growers and urban dwellers in general with more direct access to various fresh vegetables. Nevertheless, certain challenging problems associated with urban farming, including a lack of cultivation space and the effects of urban heat islands, must still be solved. Relatedly, a grower must, in some cases, also know how to utilize various forms of technology, such as lighting systems, as well as factors such as water availability. In this study, an original rooftop polytunnel design for lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Lollo Rosso) cultivation equipped with a hydroponic system and light emitting diodes (LEDs) is proposed. Various monochromatic lights were also tested for their effects on different quality parameters of lettuce. Specifically, supplemental red (655 nm), blue (445 nm), green (520 nm), and ultraviolet (380 nm) LED lights were used at night to apply photon fluxes of 150, 150, 150, and 20 μmol.m-2.s-1, respectively. The resulting effects of these different colored LEDs on the pigment concentration and growth response of the lettuce grown inside the roof polytunnel were then investigated. The experiment was then repeated several times with different environmental parameters in order to compare the effects of the different light wavelengths under higher temperatures and higher natural irradiation conditions.The results indicated that supplemental red or blue light at night could be strategically employed to maintain low nitrate levels and enhance the nutritional value and growth of lettuce grown in roof polytunnels.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2349
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