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Author Adams, J.
Title Duration of Light and Growth Type Journal Article
Year 1924 Publication Annals of Botany Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) 38 Issue 151 Pages 509-523
Keywords Plants
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2391
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Author Kwak, M.J.; Lee, S.H.; Khaine, I.; Je, S.M.; Lee, T.Y.; You, H.N.; Lee, H.K.; Jang, J.H.; Kim, I.; Woo, S.Y.
Title Stomatal movements depend on interactions between external night light cue and internal signals activated by rhythmic starch turnover and abscisic acid (ABA) levels at dawn and dusk Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Acta Physiologiae Plantarum Abbreviated Journal Acta Physiol Plant
Volume (up) 39 Issue 8 Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) is a widespread hardwood tree of great ecological and economic value. Light pollution caused by excessive and indiscriminate exposure to artificial night light has emerged as a new risk factor due to its adverse effects related to energy waste, sleep disorders, anthropogenic habitat disturbance, and perceptual disorder of daily and seasonal rhythms in wildlife. However, it remains unknown how associations between artificial night light and stomatal behaviors controlled by internal signals are established. After continuous exposure to artificial light at night over 3 years, leaves in the experimental set-up were measured for stomatal movements, starch turnover, endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) levels, and chloroplast ultrastructure during the growing season. Yellow poplar showed dynamic changes in stomatal movement, starch turnover, and endogenous ABA levels in response to day/artificial night light cycle, resulting in reduction of circadian phase-shifting capacity at both dusk and dawn and normal chloroplast development as compared with natural night. Nighttime light exposure may act as a major factor for disorder of circadian and circannual rhythms as well as physiological and ultrastructural repressor in plants, via a modification of the perceived photoperiod. Our study suggests that these dynamic responses can provide advantageous insights that complement the current knowledge on light pollution.
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ISSN 0137-5881 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1682
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the effects of light pollution: a review: Moth pollination and light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal Ecol Entomol
Volume (up) 40 Issue 3 Pages 187–198
Keywords Ecology; Agro-ecosystems; artificial night lighting; ecological networks; ecosystem services; flowering plants; food-webs; moths; population declines; plants; insects; pollination
Abstract 1. Moths (Lepidoptera) are the major nocturnal pollinators of flowers. However, their importance and contribution to the provision of pollination ecosystem services may have been under-appreciated. Evidence was identified that moths are important pollinators of a diverse range of plant species in diverse ecosystems across the world.

2. Moth populations are known to be undergoing significant declines in several European countries. Among the potential drivers of this decline is increasing light pollution. The known and possible effects of artificial night lighting upon moths were reviewed, and suggest how artificial night lighting might in turn affect the provision of pollination by moths. The need for studies of the effects of artificial night lighting upon whole communities of moths was highlighted.

3. An ecological network approach is one valuable method to consider the effects of artificial night lighting upon the provision of pollination by moths, as it provides useful insights into ecosystem functioning and stability, and may help elucidate the indirect effects of artificial light upon communities of moths and the plants they pollinate.

4. It was concluded that nocturnal pollination is an ecosystem process that may potentially be disrupted by increasing light pollution, although the nature of this disruption remains to be tested.
Address School of Biological, Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, U.K.
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Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @; IDA @ john @ Serial 1084
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Author Krause, G.H.; Weis, E.
Title Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Photosynthesis: The Basics Type Journal Article
Year 1991 Publication Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal Annu. Rev. Plant. Physiol. Plant. Mol. Biol.
Volume (up) 42 Issue 1 Pages 313-349
Keywords Plants
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ISSN 1040-2519 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 654
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Author Apostol, K.; Dumroese, R.K.; Pinto, J.R.; Davis, A.S.
Title Response of conifer species from three latitudinal populations to light spectra generated by light-emitting diodes and high-pressure sodium lamps Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Canadian Journal of Forest Research Abbreviated Journal Can. J. For. Res.
Volume (up) 45 Issue 12 Pages 1711-1719
Keywords plants
Abstract Light-emitting diode (LED) technology shows promise for supplementing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest nurseries because of the potential reduction in energy consumption and an ability to supply discrete wavelengths to optimize seedling growth. Our objective was to examine the effects of light spectra supplied by LED and traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on growth and physiology of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) seedlings. We used three latitudinal sources for each species: British Columbia (BC), Idaho (ID), and New Mexico (NM). Container seedlings were grown for 17 weeks in the greenhouse under an 18-h photoperiod of ambient solar light supplemented with light delivered from HPS or LED. In general, seedlings grown under LED had significantly greater growth, gas exchange rates, and chlorophyll contents than those seedlings grown under HPS. The growth and physiological responses to supplemental lighting varied greatly among species and seed sources. Generally, LED-grown seedlings from BC had the greatest growth and tissue dry matter followed by ID and NM populations. Compared with HPS, the significant increase in seedling growth and concomitant energy savings with LED (29% energy consumption relative to HPS) demonstrates the promise of using LED as PAR supplemental lighting for container seedling production.
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ISSN 0045-5067 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1250
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