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Author Gómez, C.; Mitchell, C.A.
Title Physiological and Productivity Responses of High-wire Tomato as Affected by Supplemental Light Source and Distribution within the Canopy Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science Abbreviated Journal J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci.
Volume (up) 141 Issue 2 Pages 196-208
Keywords Plants; tomato; LED; LED lighting; Solanum lycopersicum; intracanopy lighting; greenhouses; intracanopy supplemental lighting; daily light integral
Abstract The relative coolness-to-touch of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has enabled commercial implementation of intracanopy lighting (ICL) in the greenhouse. Intracanopy lighting, which refers to the strategy of lighting along the side or from within the foliar canopy, can increase canopy photosynthetic activity, but physiological and productivity responses of high-wire greenhouse tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to intracanopy supplemental lighting (SL) still are not yet fully understood. Two consecutive production experiments were conducted across seasons in a glass-glazed greenhouse located in a midnorthern, continental climate [lat. 40°N (West Lafayette, IN)]. Plants were grown from winter-to-summer [increasing solar daily light integral (DLI)] and from summer-to-winter (decreasing solar DLI) to compare three SL strategies for high-wire tomato production across changing solar DLIs: top lighting with high-pressure sodium lamps (HPS) vs. intracanopy LED vertical towers vs. hybrid SL (HPS + horizontal ICL-LEDs). A control treatment also was included for which no SL was provided. Supplemental DLI for each experimental period was adjusted monthly, to complement seasonal changes in sunlight, aiming to approach a target total DLI of 25 mol·m‒2·d‒1 during fruit set. Harvest parameters (total fruit fresh weight, number of fruit harvested, and average cluster fresh weight), tissue temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence, and stomatal conductance (gS) were unaffected by SL treatment in both experiments. Among the physiological parameters evaluated, CO2 assimilation measured under light-saturating conditions, light-limited quantum-use efficiency, and maximum gross CO2 assimilation (Amax) proved to be good indicators of how ICL reduces the top-to-bottom decline in leaf photosynthetic activity otherwise measured with top lighting only (HPS-SL or solar). Although SL generally increased fruit yield relative to control, lack of SL treatment differences among harvest parameters indicates that higher crop photosynthetic activity did not increase fruit yield. Compared with control, intracanopy SL increased yield to the same extent as top SL, but the remaining photoassimilate from ICL most likely was partitioned to maintain nonharvested, vegetative plant parts as well.
Address Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, 625 Agriculture Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2010
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher American Society for Horticultural Science Place of Publication Editor
Language Engligh Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0003-1062 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1431
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Author Flowers, N.D.; Gibson, D.J.
Title Quantified effects of artificial versus natural nighttime lighting on the Eurasian grassesBothriochloa bladhii(Poaceae) andBothriochloa ischaemum(Poaceae) and the North American grassesPanicum virgatum(Poaceae) andSorghastrum nutans(Poaceae) Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society Abbreviated Journal The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society
Volume (up) 145 Issue 2 Pages 147-155
Keywords Plants
Abstract Artificial nighttime lighting (light pollution) is increasing worldwide and may have undocumented consequences. In this study, we asked if artificial nighttime lighting affects the performance in monoculture of four grass species: the Eurasian Bothriochloa bladhii (Retz.) S.T. Blake (Poaceae), and Bothriochloa ischaemum (L.) Keng (Poaceae); and the North American Panicum virgatum (L.) (Poaceae), and Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash (Poaceae). We conducted a field pot experiment to test for the effects of artificial nighttime lighting and plant density on height, biomass, and leaf number. Height of the tallest individual per population was affected by separate interactions between species and density, light, and time. Final total biomass per individual biomass was increased under nighttime lighting, but more so at low density. Leaf number was increased by artificial nighttime lighting irrespective of species. These results suggest that artificial nighttime lighting may have previously undocumented influences on plant height, biomass, and leaf number within certain species. These findings warrant more in-depth studies into the role that artificial nighttime lighting can have on various plant species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1095-5674 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1902
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Author Lang, M.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.; Sowinska, M.; Heisel, F.; Miehé, J.A.
Title Fluorescence Imaging of Water and Temperature Stress in Plant Leaves Type Journal Article
Year 1996 Publication Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plant Physiology
Volume (up) 148 Issue 5 Pages 613-621
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0176-1617 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 656
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Author Buschmann, C.; Lichtenthaler, H.K.
Title Principles and characteristics of multi-colour fluorescence imaging of plants Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication Journal of Plant Physiology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Plant Physiology
Volume (up) 152 Issue 2-3 Pages 297-314
Keywords Plants
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0176-1617 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 652
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Author Bian, Z.; Cheng, R.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Lu, C.
Title Effect of green light on nitrate reduction and edible quality of hydroponically grown lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) under short-term continuous light from red and blue light-emitting diodes Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Environmental and Experimental Botany Abbreviated Journal Environmental and Experimental Botany
Volume (up) 153 Issue Pages 63-71
Keywords Plants
Abstract Most leafy vegetables can accumulate large amounts of nitrate, which are often associated with harmful effects on human health. Nitrate assimilation in plants is determined by various growth conditions, especially light conditions including light intensity, light duration and light spectral composition. Red and blue light are the most important since both drive photosynthesis. Increasingly, recent evidence demonstrates a role for green light in the regulation of plant growth and development by regulating the expression of some specific genes. However, the effect of green light on nitrate assimilation has been underestimated. In this study, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Butterhead) was treated with continuous light (CL) for 48 h by combined red and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) supplemented with or without green LED in an environment-controlled growth chamber. The results showed that nitrate reductase (NR) and nitrite reductase (NiR) related-gene expression and nitrate assimilation enzyme activities were affected by light spectral composition and light duration of CL. Adding green light to red and blue light promoted NR and NiR expressions at 24 h, subsequently, it reduced expression of these genes during CL. Compared with red and blue LEDs, green light supplementation significantly increased NR, NiR, glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) activities. Green-light supplementation under red and blue light was more efficient in promoting nutritional values by maintaining high net photosynthetic rates (Pn) and maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0098-8472 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1915
Permanent link to this record