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Author Ardavani, O.; Zerefos, S.; Doulos, L.T.
Title Redesigning the exterior lighting as part of the urban landscape: The role of transgenic bioluminescent plants in mediterranean urban and suburban lighting environments Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Journal of Cleaner Production Abbreviated Journal Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume 242 Issue Pages 118477
Keywords Plants; Lighting
Abstract This research discusses the feasibility of replacing or supporting artificial lighting with Transgenic Bioluminescent Plants (TBP), as a means of minimizing light pollution, reducing electrical energy consumption and de-carbonizing urban and suburban outdoor environments, creating sustainable conditions and enriching the quality of life. Until now, no information is given about the light output of any TBPs and the question “Are the TBPs capable of producing the necessary lighting levels for exterior lighting?” is unanswered. For this reason, a new methodology is proposed for selecting and analyzing the lighting output potential of transgenic plants ted for specific climatic conditions. This methodology considers growth and reduction factors, as well as a formulae for estimating the plants’ luminous output by performing light measurements. Results show that transgenic plants in medium growth can emit a median luminous flux of up to 57 lm, a value that can definitely support low lighting requirements when used in large numbers of plants. From the lighting measurements and calculations performed in this research, the light output of the TBPs for a typical road with 5m width was found equal to 2lx. The amount of plants required was 40 at each side of the road for every 30m of streets with P6 road class. The results show that the use of bioluminescent plants can actually contribute to the reduction of energy consumption, concerning only the lighting criterium, thus creating an enormous opportunity for a new state-of- the-art market and research that could potentially minimize CO2 emissions and light pollution, improve urban and suburban microclimate, mitigate the effects of climate change, as well as provide an alternative means of lighting affecting both outdoor lighting design and landscape planning in suburban and urban settings. Moreover, further research should be applied considering also other possible ecological impacts before applying TBPs for exterior lighting applications.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0959-6526 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2711
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Author Macgregor, C.J.; Pocock, M.J.O.; Fox, R.; Evans, D.M.
Title Effects of street lighting technologies on the success and quality of pollination in a nocturnally pollinated plant Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Ecosphere Abbreviated Journal Ecosphere
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages e02550
Keywords Ecology; Animals; Plants
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is an increasingly important driver of global change. Lighting directly affects plants, but few studies have investigated indirect effects mediated by interacting organisms. Nocturnal Lepidoptera are globally important pollinators, and pollen transport by moths is disrupted by lighting. Many street lighting systems are being replaced with novel, energy‐efficient lighting, with unknown ecological consequences. Using the wildflower Silene latifolia, we compared pollination success and quality at experimentally lit and unlit plots, testing two major changes to street lighting technology: in lamp type, from high‐pressure sodium lamps to light‐emitting diodes, and in lighting regime, from full‐night (FN) to part‐night (PN) lighting. We predicted that lighting would reduce pollination. S. latifolia was pollinated both diurnally and nocturnally. Contrary to our predictions, flowers under FN lighting had higher pollination success than flowers under either PN lighting or unlit controls, which did not significantly differ from each other. Lamp type, lighting regime, and distance from the light all significantly affected aspects of pollination quality. These results confirm that street lighting could affect plant reproduction through indirect effects mediated by nocturnal insects, and further highlight the possibility for novel lighting technologies to mitigate the effects of ALAN on ecosystems.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-8925 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2174
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Author Viera-Perez, M.; Hernandez-Calvento, L.; Hesp, P.A.; Santana-Del Pino, A.
Title Effects of artificial light on flowering of foredune vegetation Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Ecology Abbreviated Journal Ecology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract The impact of ecological light pollution involves alteration of periods of natural light, a fact that has proven effects on ecosystems. Few studies have focused on the impact of this pollution on wild plant species, and none on coastal dune plants. Many coastal dunes and their plants are adjacent to tourist areas, and these might be affected by light pollution. Such is the case of the Natural Reserve Dunas de Maspalomas (Gran Canaria), where some individuals of the plant species Traganum moquinii, located in the El Ingles beach foredune zone, are affected by light pollution. This study examines the effect of light pollution on the flowering process, and by extension the reproductive cycle of these plants. Plants located closer to high artificial illumination sources receive ~2120 hours per year of intense light more than plants located furthest from those artificial lighting sources. Parts of the plants of Traganum moquinii exposed directly to the artificial light show a significant decrease in the production of flowers, compared to the parts in plants in shade, and to the plants more distant from artificial lights. In consequence, plants exposed more directly to artificial light have a lower potential for seed reproduction. The spectrum of artificial light also affects the plants, and light between 600 and 700 nm primarily affects the reproductive cycle of the Traganum moquinii species. The implications for the ecological and geomorphological functioning of the dune system are discussed, because this species plays a decisive role in the formation of foredune zones and nebkhas in arid dune systems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30825328 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2244
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Author Owen, W. G., & Lopez, R. G.
Title Comparison of Sole-source and Supplemental Lighting on Callus Formation and Initial Rhizogenesis of Gaura and Salvia Cuttings Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication HortScience Abbreviated Journal
Volume 54 Issue 4 Pages 684-691
Keywords Plants
Abstract Variability in outdoor daily temperatures and photosynthetic daily light integrals (DLIs) from early spring to late fall limits the ability of propagators to accurately control propagation environments to consistently callus, root, and yield compact herbaceous perennial rooted liners. We evaluated and compared the effects of sole-source lighting (SSL) delivered from red (R) and blue (B) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to supplemental lighting (SL) provided by high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on herbaceous perennial cutting morphology, physiology, and growth during callusing and initial rhizogenesis. Cuttings of perennial sage (Salvia nemorosa L. ‘Lyrical Blues’) and wand flower (Gaura lindheimeri Engelm. and A. Gray ‘Siskiyou Pink’) were propagated in a walk-in growth chamber under multilayer SSL provided by LEDs with [R (660 nm)]:[B (460 nm)] light ratios (%) of 100:0 (R100:B0), 75:25 (R75:B25), 50:50 (R50:B50), or 0:100 (R0:B100) delivering 60 µmol·m−2·s–1 for 16 hours (total DLI of 3.4 mol·m−2·d−1). In a glass-glazed greenhouse (GH control), cuttings were propagated under ambient solar light and day-extension SL provided by HPS lamps delivering 40 µmol·m−2·s–1 to provide a 16-hour photoperiod (total DLI of 3.3 mol·m−2·d−1). At 10 days after sticking cuttings, callus diameter and rooting percentage were similar among all light-quality treatments. For instance, callus diameter, a measure of growth, of wand flower cuttings increased from an average 1.7 mm at stick (0 day) to a range of 2.7 to 2.9 mm at 10 days after sticking, regardless of lighting treatment. Relative leaf chlorophyll content was generally greater under SSL R75:B25 or R50:B50 than all other light-quality treatments. However, stem length of perennial sage and wand flower cuttings propagated under SSL R50:B50 at 10 days were 21% and 30% shorter and resulted in 50% and 8% greater root biomass, respectively, compared with those under SL. The herbaceous perennial cuttings propagated in this study under SSL R50:B50 were of similar quality or more compact compared with those under SL, indicating that callus induction and initial rooting can occur under LEDs in a multilayer SSL propagation system.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2346
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Author Chang, C., Chang, K., & Fu, W.
Title Testing of Various Monochromatic LED Lights Used in Supplemental Irradiation of Lettuce in Modern urban Rooftop Polytunnels Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Applied Engineering in Agriculture Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Plants
Abstract Urban farming could provide both vegetable growers and urban dwellers in general with more direct access to various fresh vegetables. Nevertheless, certain challenging problems associated with urban farming, including a lack of cultivation space and the effects of urban heat islands, must still be solved. Relatedly, a grower must, in some cases, also know how to utilize various forms of technology, such as lighting systems, as well as factors such as water availability. In this study, an original rooftop polytunnel design for lettuce (Lactuca sativa cv. Lollo Rosso) cultivation equipped with a hydroponic system and light emitting diodes (LEDs) is proposed. Various monochromatic lights were also tested for their effects on different quality parameters of lettuce. Specifically, supplemental red (655 nm), blue (445 nm), green (520 nm), and ultraviolet (380 nm) LED lights were used at night to apply photon fluxes of 150, 150, 150, and 20 μmol.m-2.s-1, respectively. The resulting effects of these different colored LEDs on the pigment concentration and growth response of the lettuce grown inside the roof polytunnel were then investigated. The experiment was then repeated several times with different environmental parameters in order to compare the effects of the different light wavelengths under higher temperatures and higher natural irradiation conditions.The results indicated that supplemental red or blue light at night could be strategically employed to maintain low nitrate levels and enhance the nutritional value and growth of lettuce grown in roof polytunnels.
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2349
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