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Author Falcon, J.; Torriglia, A.; Attia, D.; Vienot, F.; Gronfier, C.; Behar-Cohen, F.; Martinsons, C.; Hicks, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Exposure to Artificial Light at Night and the Consequences for Flora, Fauna, and Ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Frontiers in Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Front Neurosci  
  Volume 14 Issue Pages 602796  
  Keywords Review; Animals; Plants; Ecology; anthropogenic impact; artificial-light-at-night; biological clocks; ecosystems; light-emitting-diodes; photoreception  
  Abstract The present review draws together wide-ranging studies performed over the last decades that catalogue the effects of artificial-light-at-night (ALAN) upon living species and their environment. We provide an overview of the tremendous variety of light-detection strategies which have evolved in living organisms – unicellular, plants and animals, covering chloroplasts (plants), and the plethora of ocular and extra-ocular organs (animals). We describe the visual pigments which permit photo-detection, paying attention to their spectral characteristics, which extend from the ultraviolet into infrared. We discuss how organisms use light information in a way crucial for their development, growth and survival: phototropism, phototaxis, photoperiodism, and synchronization of circadian clocks. These aspects are treated in depth, as their perturbation underlies much of the disruptive effects of ALAN. The review goes into detail on circadian networks in living organisms, since these fundamental features are of critical importance in regulating the interface between environment and body. Especially, hormonal synthesis and secretion are often under circadian and circannual control, hence perturbation of the clock will lead to hormonal imbalance. The review addresses how the ubiquitous introduction of light-emitting diode technology may exacerbate, or in some cases reduce, the generalized ever-increasing light pollution. Numerous examples are given of how widespread exposure to ALAN is perturbing many aspects of plant and animal behaviour and survival: foraging, orientation, migration, seasonal reproduction, colonization and more. We examine the potential problems at the level of individual species and populations and extend the debate to the consequences for ecosystems. We stress, through a few examples, the synergistic harmful effects resulting from the impacts of ALAN combined with other anthropogenic pressures, which often impact the neuroendocrine loops in vertebrates. The article concludes by debating how these anthropogenic changes could be mitigated by more reasonable use of available technology – for example by restricting illumination to more essential areas and hours, directing lighting to avoid wasteful radiation and selecting spectral emissions, to reduce impact on circadian clocks. We end by discussing how society should take into account the potentially major consequences that ALAN has on the natural world and the repercussions for ongoing human health and welfare.  
  Address Inserm, CNRS, Institut des Neurosciences Cellulaires et Integratives, Universite de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, France  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1662-453X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:33304237; PMCID:PMC7701298 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3245  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Elkins, C.; Van Iersel, M. W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Supplemental Far-red Light-emitting Diode Light Increases Growth of Foxglove Seedlings Under Sole-source Lighting Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication HortTechnology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages 564-569  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Seedlings may be grown indoors where environmental conditions can be precisely controlled to ensure consistent and reliable production. The optimal spectrum for production under sole-source lighting is currently unknown. Far-red light (λ = 700–800 nm) typically is not a significant part of the spectrum of light-emitting diode (LED) grow lights. However, far-red light is photosynthetically active and can enhance leaf elongation, which may result in larger leaves and increased light interception. We hypothesized that adding far-red light to sole-source lighting would increase the growth of ‘Dalmatian Peach’ foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) seedlings grown under white LED lights, potentially shortening production times. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of far-red light intensities, ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1, on the growth and morphology of foxglove seedlings. Foxglove seedlings were grown in a growth chamber with a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 186 ± 6.4 μmol·m−2·s−1 and supplemental far-red light intensities ranging from 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1. As far-red light increased, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, plant height, and plant height/number of leaves increased by 38% (P = 0.004), 20% (P = 0.029), 38% (P = 0.025), and 34% (P = 0.024), respectively, while root weight fraction decreased 16% (P = 0.034). Although we expected supplemental far-red light to induce leaf and/or stem expansion, specific leaf area and compactness (two measures of morphology) were unaffected. Because a 37% increase in total photon flux density (PPFD plus far-red light) resulted in a 34.5% increase in total plant dry weight, the increased growth likely was due to increased photosynthesis rather than a shade-acclimation response. The growth response was linear across the 4.0 to 68.8 µmol·m−2·s−1 range of far-fed light tested, so we were unable to determine a saturating far-red photon flux density.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3266  
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Author Camejo, D.; Frutos, A.; Mestre, T.C.; del Carmen Piñero, M.; Rivero, R.M.; Martínez, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light impacts the physical and nutritional quality of lettuce plants Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology Abbreviated Journal Hortic. Environ. Biotechnol.  
  Volume 61 Issue 1 Pages 69-82  
  Keywords Plants; Antioxidants; Bioactive compounds; Enzymes; Growth; lettuce; Lactuca sativa  
  Abstract Leafy vegetables, including lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), are considered to be healthy due to their high content of fiber, folate, carotenoids, phenolic and antioxidant compounds, minerals, and vitamins A, C, and K. Recently, LEDs are being used extensively as a supplementary light source in indoor agriculture due to the economical and physiological advantages that this artificial illumination offers compared to traditional fluorescence illumination. In this work, two commercially important lettuce varieties, Batavia Lettony (green leaves) and Batavia Diablotin (red leaves), were used to study the impact of LEDs (white and red–blue lights) and fluorescent illumination on their quality and health properties. Changes in the photosynthetic photon flux density from 250 to 400 µmol m−2 s−1 of fluorescent light increased growth parameters (leaf number, fresh and dry weight, and percentage of dry matter) of B. Lettony plants. We observed a positive impact of red–blue LED illumination on growth parameters analyzed in B. Diablotin plants compared to plants grown under fluorescent light at 250 µmol m−2 s−1. Leaf texture significantly increased in B. Lettony plants grown under 400 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent and LED illumination compared to that of plants grown under 250 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. This variable was only increased under red–blue LED illumination in B. Diablotin plants. Accumulation of bioactive compounds, such as anthocyanins and vitamin C, was higher in B. Diablotin plants grown under 250 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. Nutrient content in the foliar part was not modified under the light conditions used, except the Ca2+ content of B. Lettony plants grown under PPFD 400 µmol m−2 s−1 fluorescent light. Catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) activities were differentially modified by light conditions in B. Lettony plants. However, POX activity was only modified in response to light conditions in B. Diablotin plants. Thus, this study demonstrates that LEDs could be used as an alternative to produce food under sustainable conditions. In this sense, although several horticultural studies have been conducted to establish the effectiveness of LEDs in lettuce growth, additional investigations are necessary to determine the optimal conditions for the use of LEDs to promote lettuce production and the accumulation of beneficial components, such as vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidant compounds.  
  Address Department of Plant Nutrition, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, P.O. Box 164, 30100, Espinardo, Murcia, Spain;  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2211-3452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3393  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Meravi, N.; Kumar Prajapati, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect street light pollution on the photosynthetic efficiency of different plants Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Biological Rhythm Research Abbreviated Journal Biological Rhythm Research  
  Volume 51 Issue 1 Pages 67-75  
  Keywords Plants; Light pollution; Fv/Fm; Y (NPQ); Y (NO); Fluorescence  
  Abstract The present study was conducted to study the effect of light pollution on the photosynthetic efficiency of plants growing near to street light. The photosynthetic parameters Fv/Fm (Fm – Fo/Fm); maximum photochemical quantum yield of PS II (photosystem II), Y II (photochemical quantum yield of photosystem II), Y (NPQ), Y (NO) were recorded with the help of JUNIOR‐PAM, Chlorophyll Fluorometer, Heinz Walz GmbH, Germany. It was observed that various parameters were adversely affected and the observed values show that plants is under some sort of stress which may be disturbing their normal physiological processes.  
  Address sntshprjpt ( at ) rediffmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0929-1016 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3408  
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Author García-Caparros, P.; Almansa, E.M.; Barbero, F.J.; Chica, R.M.; Lao, M.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Fittonia verschaffeltii Response to Artificial Light Treatments: BIOMASS, Nutrient Concentrations and Physiological Changes Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Agronomy Abbreviated Journal Agronomy  
  Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 126  
  Keywords Plants; carotenoids; chlorophyll; mineral composition; plant growth; proline; starch  
  Abstract The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different light treatments on biomass, nutrient concentrations and physiological parameters of Fittonia verschaffeltii (Lem) Van Houtte. The aim was to establish a methodology to evaluate the effect of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) emitted by lamps on biomass. The light treatments used were tube luminescent Dunn (TL-D), tube luminescent Dunn + light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Tube luminescent 5 (TL-5). At the end of the experimental period, biomass, nutritional, biochemical, and physiological parameters were assessed. A clear reduction in total plant dry weight under TL-D + LEDs at the end of the experiment was recorded. With respect to nutrient concentration in the different organs assessed, there was no clear response under the different light treatments. The growth under TL-D lamps resulted in the highest concentration of total soluble sugars and starch in leaves, whereas the highest value of indole 3-acetic acid concentration was under TL-5 lamps. Plants grown under TL-D + LEDs showed the lowest values of chlorophyll a, b and a + b. The relationship proposed between integrated use of spectral energy (IUSE) and total dry weight (TDW) showed a good correlation with an R2 value of 0.86, therefore we recommend this methodology to discern the effects of the different spectral qualities on plant biomass.  
  Address Agronomy Department of Higher Engineering School, University of Almeria, CIAIMBITAL, Agrifood Campus of International Excellence ceiA3. Ctra. Sacramento s/n, La Cañada de San Urbano, 04120 Almería, Spain; pedrogar123 ( at ) hotmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2073-4395 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 3409  
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