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Author Zheng, Z.; Wu, Z.; Chen, Y.; Yang, Z.; Marinello, F.
Title Exploration of eco-environment and urbanization changes in coastal zones: A case study in China over the past 20 years Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators
Volume 119 Issue Pages 106847
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) With the rapid development of urbanization and population migration, since the 20th century, the natural and eco-environment of coastal areas have been under tremendous pressure due to the strong interference of human response. To objectively evaluate the coastal eco-environment condition and explore the impact from the urbanization process, this paper, by integrating daytime remote sensing and nighttime remote sensing, carried out a quantitative assessment of the coastal zone of China in 2000–2019 based on Remote Sensing Ecological Index (RSEI) and Comprehensive Nighttime Light Index (CNLI) respectively. The results showed that: 1) the overall eco-environmental conditions in China's coastal zone have shown a trend of improvement, but regional differences still exist; 2) during the study period, the urbanization process of cities continued to advance, especially in seaside cities and prefecture-level cities in Jiangsu and Shandong, which were much higher than the average growth rate; 3) the Coupling Coordination Degree (CCD) between the urbanization and eco-environment in coastal cities is constantly increasing, but the main contribution of environmental improvement comes from non-urbanized areas, and the eco-environment pressure in urbanized areas is still not optimistic. As a large-scale, long-term series of eco-environment and urbanization process change analysis, this study can provide theoretical support for mesoscale development planning, eco-environment condition monitoring and environmental protection policies from decision-makers.
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ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3113
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Author Wei, Y., Chen, Z., Xiu, C., Yu, B., & Liu, H.
Title Siting of Dark Sky Reserves in China Based on Multi-source Spatial Data and Multiple Criteria Evaluation Method Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Chinese Geographical Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-13
Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) With the rapid development of population and urbanization and the progress of lighting technology, the influence of artificial light sources has increased. In this context, the problem of light pollution has attracted wide attention. Previous studies have revealed that light pollution can affect biological living environments, human physical and mental health, astronomical observations and many other aspects. Therefore, organizations internationally have begun to advocate for measures to prevent light pollution, many of which are recognized by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). In addition to improving public awareness, legal protections, technical treatments and other means, the construction of Dark Sky Reserves (DSR) has proven to be an effective preventive measure. So far, as a pioneer practice in this field, the IDA has identified 11 DSRs worldwide. Based on the DA requirements for DSRs, this paper utilizes NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data and other multi-source spatial data to analyze possible DSR sites in China. The land of China was divided into more than ten thousand 30 km × 30 km fishnets, and constraint and suitable conditions were designated, respectively, as light and cloud conditions, and scale, traffic and attractiveness conditions. Using a multiple criteria evaluation, 1443 fishnets were finally selected as most suitable sites for the construction of DSRs. Results found that less than 25% of China is not subject to light pollution, and less than 13% is suitable for DSR construction, primarily in western and northern areas, including Tibet, Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu and Inner Mongolia.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2724
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Author Coesfeld, J.; Anderson, S.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Schernthanner, H.; Kyba, C.
Title Variation of Individual Location Radiance in VIIRS DNB Monthly Composite Images Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages 1964
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract (down) With the growing size and use of night light time series from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB), it is important to understand the stability of the dataset. All satellites observe differences in pixel values during repeat observations. In the case of night light data, these changes can be due to both environmental effects and changes in light emission. Here we examine the stability of individual locations of particular large scale light sources (e.g., airports and prisons) in the monthly composites of DNB data from April 2012 to September 2017. The radiances for individual pixels of most large light emitters are approximately normally distributed, with a standard deviation of typically 15–20% of the mean. Greenhouses and flares, however, are not stable sources. We observe geospatial autocorrelation in the monthly variations for nearby sites, while the correlation for sites separated by large distances is small. This suggests that local factors contribute most to the variation in the pixel radiances and furthermore that averaging radiances over large areas will reduce the total variation. A better understanding of the causes of temporal variation would improve the sensitivity of DNB to lighting changes.
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ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2129
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Author Leng, W.; He, G.; Jiang, W.
Title Investigating the Spatiotemporal Variability and Driving Factors of Artificial Lighting in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region Using Remote Sensing Imagery and Socioeconomic Data Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health Abbreviated Journal Int J Environ Res Public Health
Volume 16 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) With rapid urbanization and economic development, artificial lighting at night brings convenience to human life but also causes a considerable urban environmental pollution issue. This study employed the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test, nighttime light indices, and the standard deviation method to investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of artificial lighting in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Moreover, nighttime light imagery from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System, socioeconomic data, and high-resolution satellite images were combined to comprehensively explore the driving factors of urban artificial lighting change. The results showed the following: (1) Overall, there was an increasing trend in artificial lighting in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, which accounted for approximately 56.87% of the total study area. (2) The change in artificial lighting in the entire area was relatively stable. The artificial lighting in the northwest area changed faster than that in the southeast area, and the areas where artificial lighting changed the most were Beijing, Tianjin and Tangshan. (3) The fastest growth of artificial lighting was in Chengde and Zhangjiakou, where the rates of increase were 334% and 251%, respectively. The spatial heterogeneity of artificial lighting in economically developed cities was higher than that in economically underdeveloped cities such as Chengde and Zhangjiakou. (4) Multi-source data were combined to analyse the driving factors of urban artificial lighting in the entire area. The Average Population of Districts under City (R(2) = 0.77) had the strongest effect on artificial lighting. Total Passenger Traffic (R(2) = 0.54) had the most non-obvious effect. At different city levels, driving factors varied with differences of economy, geographical location, and the industrial structures of cities. Urban expansion, transportation hubs, and industries were the major reasons for the significant change in nighttime light. Urban artificial lighting represents a trend of overuse closely related to nighttime light pollution. This study of artificial lighting contributes to the rational planning of urban lighting systems, the prevention and control of nighttime light pollution, and the creation of liveable and ecologically green cities.
Address China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (IWHR), Beijing 100038, China. jiangwei@radi.ac.cn
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ISSN 1660-4601 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:31159391 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2535
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Author Rybnikova, N.A.; Haim, A.; Portnova, B.A.
Title Is Prostate Cancer Incidence Worldwide Linked to Artificial Light at Night Exposures? Earlier Findings' Revisit and Current Trends' Analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Archives of Environmental & Occupational Health Abbreviated Journal Arch Environ Occup Health
Volume 72 Issue 2 Pages 111-122
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Widespread use of artificial light at night (ALAN) might contribute to the global burden of hormone-dependent cancers. However, previous attempts to verify this association in population-level studies have been sparse. Using the GLOBOCAN, US-DMSP and World Bank's 2010-2012 databases, we studied the association between ALAN and prostate cancer (PC) incidence in 180 countries worldwide, controlling for several country-level confounders. As our analysis indicates, the PC-ALAN association emerged marginally significant when year-2012 PC age-standardized rate data were compared with ALAN levels (t = 1.886, P<0.1); while this association emerged as more significant (t>2.7; P<0.01) when only 110 countries with well-maintained cancer registries were analyzed. Along with other variables, ALAN explains up to 79% of PC ASRs variability. PC-ALAN association appears to vary regionally, with the greatest deviations in Central Africa, Small Island Developing States, South East Asia and Gulf States.
Address a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Faculty of Management, University of Haifa, 31805, Carmel, Mt, Israel
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ISSN 1933-8244 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:27029744 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1412
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