|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Roman, M.O.; Stokes, E.C.; Shrestha, R.; Wang, Z.; Schultz, L.; Carlo, E.A.S.; Sun, Q.; Bell, J.; Molthan, A.; Kalb, V.; Ji, C.; Seto, K.C.; McClain, S.N.; Enenkel, M.
Title Satellite-based assessment of electricity restoration efforts in Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication PloS one Abbreviated Journal PLoS One
Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages e0218883
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract A real-time understanding of the distribution and duration of power outages after a major disaster is a precursor to minimizing their harmful consequences. Here, we develop an approach for using daily satellite nighttime lights data to create spatially disaggregated power outage estimates, tracking electricity restoration efforts after disasters strike. In contrast to existing utility data, these estimates are independent, open, and publicly-available, consistently measured across regions that may be serviced by several different power companies, and inclusive of distributed power supply (off-grid systems). We apply the methodology in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, which caused the longest blackout in US history. Within all of the island's settlements, we track outages and recovery times, and link these measures to census-based demographic characteristics of residents. Our results show an 80% decrease in lights, in total, immediately after Hurricane Maria. During the recovery, a disproportionate share of long-duration power failures (> 120 days) occurred in rural municipalities (41% of rural municipalities vs. 29% of urban municipalities), and in the northern and eastern districts. Unexpectedly, we also identify large disparities in electricity recovery between neighborhoods within the same urban area, based primarily on the density of housing. For many urban areas, poor residents, the most vulnerable to increased mortality and morbidity risks from power losses, shouldered the longest outages because they lived in less dense, detached housing where electricity restoration lagged. The approach developed in this study demonstrates the potential of satellite-based estimates of power recovery to improve the real-time monitoring of disaster impacts, globally, at a spatial resolution that is actionable for the disaster response community.
Address (down) Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31251791 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2564
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhuo, L.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, X.; Li, J.; Liu, L.
Title An improved method of night-time light saturation reduction based on EVI Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 36 Issue 16 Pages 4114-4130
Keywords Remote Sensing; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; Nighttime Lights; NTL; VANUI; EVI; EANTLI; RCNTL; VIIRS
Abstract Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) night-time light (NTL) data have been widely applied to studies on anthropogenic activities and their interactions with the environment. Due to limitations of the OLS sensor, DMSP NTL data suffer from a saturation problem in central urban areas, which further affects studies based on nocturnal lights. Recently, the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI) has been developed based on the inverse correlation of vegetation and urban surfaces. Despite its simple implementation and ability to effectively increase variations in NTL data, VANUI does not perform well in certain rapidly growing cities. In this study, we propose a new index, denoted enhanced vegetation index (EVI)-adjusted NTL index (EANTLI), that was developed by reforming the VANUI algorithm and utilizing the EVI. Comparisons with radiance-calibrated NTL (RCNTL) and the new Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) data for 15 cities worldwide show that EANTLI reduces saturation in urban cores and mitigates the blooming effect in suburban areas. EANTLI’s similarity to RCNTL and VIIRS is consistently higher than VANUI’s similarity to RCNTL and VIIRS in both spatial distribution and latitudinal transects. EANTLI also yields better results in the estimation of electric power consumption of 166 Chinese prefecture-level cities. In conclusion, EANTLI can effectively reduce NTL saturation in urban centres, thus presenting great potential for wide-range applications.
Address (down) Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Geo-simulation, School of Geography and Planning, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, PR China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1245
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, J.; Zhao, F.; Zeng, N.; Oda, T.
Title Comparing a global high-resolution downscaled fossil fuel CO2 emission dataset to local inventory-based estimates over 14 global cities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Carbon Balance and Management Abbreviated Journal Carbon Balance Manag
Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 9
Keywords Remote Sensing; City CO2 emissions; Emission inventory; Fossil fuel CO2 emissions; In-boundary; Odiac
Abstract BACKGROUND: Compilation of emission inventories (EIs) for cities is a whole new challenge to assess the subnational climate mitigation effort under the Paris Climate Agreement. Some cities have started compiling EIs, often following a global community protocol. However, EIs are often difficult to systematically examine because of the ways they were compiled (data collection and emission calculation) and reported (sector definition and direct vs consumption). In addition, such EI estimates are not readily applicable to objective evaluation using modeling and observations due to the lack of spatial emission extents. City emission estimates used in the science community are often based on downscaled gridded EIs, while the accuracy of the downscaled emissions at city level is not fully assessed. RESULTS: This study attempts to assess the utility of the downscaled emissions at city level. We collected EIs from 14 major global cities and compare them to the estimates from a global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 emission data product (ODIAC) commonly used in the science research community. We made necessary adjustments to the estimates to make our comparison as reasonable as possible. We found that the two methods produce very close area-wide emission estimates for Shanghai and Delhi (< 10% difference), and reach good consistency in half of the cities examined (< 30% difference). The ODIAC dataset exhibits a much higher emission compared to inventory estimates in Cape Town (+ 148%), Sao Paulo (+ 43%) and Beijing (+ 40%), possibly related to poor correlation between nightlight intensity with human activity, such as the high-emission and low-lighting industrial parks in developing countries. On the other hand, ODIAC shows lower estimates in Manhattan (- 62%), New York City (- 45%), Washington D.C. (- 42%) and Toronto (- 33%), all located in North America, which may be attributable to an underestimation of residential emissions from heating in ODIAC's nightlight-based approach, and an overestimation of emission from ground transportation in registered vehicles statistics of inventory estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively good agreement suggests that the ODIAC data product could potentially be used as a first source for prior estimate of city-level CO2 emission, which is valuable for atmosphere CO2 inversion modeling and comparing with satellite CO2 observations. Our compilation of in-boundary emission estimates for 14 cities contributes towards establishing an accurate inventory in-boundary global city carbon emission dataset, necessary for accountable local climate mitigation policies in the future.
Address (down) Goddard Earth Sciences Research and Technology, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1750-0680 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32430547 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2929
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Kuester, T.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Baugh, K.; Jechow, A.; Hölker, F.; Bennie, J.; Elvidge, C.; Gaston, K.; Guanter, L.
Title Artificially lit surface of Earth at night increasing in radiance and extent Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci Adv
Volume 3 Issue 11 Pages e1701528
Keywords Remote Sensing; Suomi NPP; VIIRS; light pollution; *economics
Abstract A central aim of the â??lighting revolutionâ? (the transition to solid-state lighting technology) is decreased energy consumption. This could be undermined by a rebound effect of increased use in response to lowered cost of light. We use the first-ever calibrated satellite radiometer designed for night lights to show that from 2012 to 2016, Earthâ??s artificially lit outdoor area grew by 2.2% per year, with a total radiance growth of 1.8% per year. Continuously lit areas brightened at a rate of 2.2% per year. Large differences in national growth rates were observed, with lighting remaining stable or decreasing in only a few countries. These data are not consistent with global scale energy reductions but rather indicate increased light pollution, with corresponding negative consequences for flora, fauna, and human well-being.
Address (down) GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam 14473, Germany; kyba(at)gfz-potsdam.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher AAAS Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1789
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author de Meester, J.; Storch, T.
Title Optimized Performance Parameters for Nighttime Multispectral Satellite Imagery to Analyze Lightings in Urban Areas Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 20 Issue 11 Pages
Keywords Instrumentation; Remote Sensing; high spatial resolution; lighting parameter; lighting type classification; multispectral band optimization; nighttime remote sensing; satellite image simulation; urban area
Abstract Contrary to its daytime counterpart, nighttime visible and near infrared (VIS/NIR) satellite imagery is limited in both spectral and spatial resolution. Nevertheless, the relevance of such systems is unquestioned with applications to, e.g., examine urban areas, derive light pollution, and estimate energy consumption. To determine optimal spectral bands together with required radiometric and spatial resolution, at-sensor radiances are simulated based on combinations of lamp spectra with typical luminances according to lighting standards, surface reflectances, and radiative transfers for the consideration of atmospheric effects. Various band combinations are evaluated for their ability to differentiate between lighting types and to estimate the important lighting parameters: efficacy to produce visible light, percentage of emissions attributable to the blue part of the spectrum, and assessment of the perceived color of radiation sources. The selected bands are located in the green, blue, yellow-orange, near infrared, and red parts of the spectrum and include one panchromatic band. However, these nighttime bands tailored to artificial light emissions differ significantly from the typical daytime bands focusing on surface reflectances. Compared to existing or proposed nighttime or daytime satellites, the recommended characteristics improve, e.g., classification of lighting types by >10%. The simulations illustrate the feasible improvements in nocturnal VIS/NIR remote sensing which will lead to advanced applications.
Address (down) German Aerospace Center (DLR), Earth Observation Center (EOC), Munchener Str. 20, 82234 Wessling, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32532117 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3006
Permanent link to this record