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Author Zeng, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, S.; Yan, F.; Zhao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Population spatialization in China based on night-time imagery and land use data Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 32 Issue 24 Pages 9599-9620  
  Keywords DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; light at night; population; modeling  
  Abstract Population is a key indicator of socioeconomic development, urban planning and environmental protection, particularly for developing countries like China. But, census data for any given area are neither always available nor adequately reflect the internal differences of population. The authors tried to overcome this problem by spatializing the population across China through utilizing integer night-time imagery (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System, DMSP/OLS) and land-use data. In creating the population linear regression model, night-time light intensity and lit areas, under different types of land use, were employed as predictor variables, and census data as dependent variables. To improve model performance, eight zones were created using night-time imagery clustering and shortest path algorithm. The population model is observed to have a coefficient of determination (R 2) ranging from 0.80 to 0.95 in the research area, which remained the same in different years. A comparison of the results of this study with those of other researchers shows that the spatialized population density map, prepared on the basis of night-time imagery, reflects the population distribution character more explicitly and in greater detail.  
  Address State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science , Jointly Sponsored by the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Normal University , Beijing, 100101, PR China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 228  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Townsend, A.C.; Bruce, D.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The use of night-time lights satellite imagery as a measure of Australia's regional electricity consumption and population distribution Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 31 Issue 16 Pages 4459-4480  
  Keywords DMSP-OLS; light at night; remote sensing; satellite; skyglow  
  Abstract Satellite imagery of night-time lights provided by the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), using the Operational Linescan System (OLS), has been used to estimate the spatial distribution of electricity consumption throughout Australia. For the period 1997 to 2002, there was very high correlation between state electricity consumption and night-time lights with an R 2 value of 0.9346 at the state and territory spatial resolution. To increase the accuracy at which electricity consumption can be estimated at greater spatial resolution, an Overglow Removal Model (ORM) was developed to overcome the overglow effect caused by the dispersion of light into surrounding areas. The ORM makes use of the relationship between light source strength and the overglow/dispersion distance from the light source. As electricity consumption statistics at a greater spatial resolution than the state or territory level are not publically available in Australia, population statistics at the statistical local area (SLA) were used to demonstrate the increased accuracy of the ORM at returning the overglow light to its source, and, in turn, the accuracy of measuring electricity consumption. The ORM enabled an estimation of the electricity consumption of SLAs, greater than 10 km2, with an R 2 value of 0.8732, which is a 25.4% increase in accuracy over untreated data before applying the ORM. The increase in accuracy of the location of the origin of night-time lights can enable better georeferencing of satellite imagery of night-time lights and greater accuracy in locating population centres and centres of economic development, and assist with electricity infrastructure planning in regions of the world where statistics are not readily available. The result of the ORM is a map of Australian electricity consumption, and an estimation of the regional electricity consumption for all SLAs greater than 10 km2 in size is included.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 230  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sutton, P.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title A scale-adjusted measure of “Urban sprawl” using nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages 353-369  
  Keywords Urban sprawl; Sprawl Line; Nighttime satellite imagery; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; satellite; llight at night  
  Abstract “Urban Sprawl” is a growing concern of citizens, environmental organizations, and governments. Negative impacts often attributed to urban sprawl are traffic congestion, loss of open space, and increased pollutant runoff into natural waterways. Definitions of “Urban Sprawl” range from local patterns of land use and development to aggregate measures of per capita land consumption for given contiguous urban areas (UA). This research creates a measure of per capita land use consumption as an aggregate index for the spatially contiguous urban areas of the conterminous United States with population of 50,000 or greater. Nighttime satellite imagery obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP OLS) is used as a proxy measure of urban extent. The corresponding population of these urban areas is derived from a grid of the block group level data from the 1990 U.S. Census. These numbers are used to develop a regression equation between Ln(Urban Area) and Ln(Urban Population). The ‘scale-adjustment’ mentioned in the title characterizes the “Urban Sprawl” of each of the urban areas by how far above or below they are on the “Sprawl Line” determined by this regression. This “Sprawl Line” allows for a more fair comparison of “Urban Sprawl” between larger and smaller metropolitan areas because a simple measure of per capita land consumption or population density does not account for the natural increase in aggregate population density that occurs as cities grow in population. Cities that have more “Urban Sprawl” by this measure tended to be inland and Midwestern cities such as Minneapolis–St. Paul, Atlanta, Dallas–Ft. Worth, St. Louis, and Kansas City. Surprisingly, west coast cities including Los Angeles had some of the lowest levels of “Urban Sprawl” by this measure. There were many low light levels seen in the nighttime imagery around these major urban areas that were not included in either of the two definitions of urban extent used in this study. These areas may represent a growing commuter-shed of urban workers who do not live in the urban core but nonetheless contribute to many of the impacts typically attributed to “Urban Sprawl”. “Urban Sprawl” is difficult to define precisely partly because public perception of sprawl is likely derived from local land use planning decisions, spatio-demographic change in growing urban areas, and changing values and social mores resulting from differential rates of international migration to the urban areas of the United States. Nonetheless, the aggregate measures derived here are somewhat different than similar previously used measures in that they are ‘scale-adjusted’; also, the spatial patterns of “Urban Sprawl” shown here shed some insight and raise interesting questions about how the dynamics of “Urban Sprawl” are changing.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 233  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sutton, P.; Roberts, D.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Census from Heaven: An estimate of the global human population using night-time satellite imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2001 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing  
  Volume 22 Issue 16 Pages 3061-3076  
  Keywords light at night; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; satellite  
  Abstract Night-time satellite imagery provided by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP OLS) is evaluated as a means of estimating the population of all the cities of the world based on their areal extent in the image. A global night-time image product was registered to a dataset of 2000 known city locations with known populations. A relationship between areal extent and city population discovered by Tobler and Nordbeck is identified on a nation by nation basis to estimate the population of the 22 920 urban clusters that exist in the night-time satellite image. The relationship between city population and city areal extent was derived from 1597 city point locations with known population that landed in a 'lit' area of the image. Due to conurbation, these 1597 cities resulted in only 1383 points of analysis for performing regression. When several cities fell into one 'lit' area their populations were summed. The results of this analysis allow for an estimate of the urban population of every nation of the world. By using the known percent of population in urban areas for every nation a total national population was also estimated. The sum of these estimates is a total estimate of the global human population, which in this case was 6.3 billion. This is fairly close to the generally accepted contemporaneous (1997) estimate of the global population which stood at approximately 5.9 billion.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 234  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Duriscoe, D.M.; Luginbuhl, C.B.; Elvidge, C.D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The relation of outdoor lighting characteristics to sky glow from distant cities Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology  
  Volume 46 Issue 1 Pages 35-49  
  Keywords measurements; light pollution; light at night; Suomi NPP; satellite; remote sensing; VIIRS  
  Abstract Five cities in the southwest United States were selected for an analysis of the impact of outdoor lighting practices on nighttime sky glow as observed from distances of 8–67 km. Data from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite visible infrared imaging radiometer suite day/night band were used to identify light sources for input to an atmospheric sky glow model. Total lumens of outdoor lighting were estimated by matching modelled to observed anthropogenic sky luminance at ground locations. The results of two conservative treatments were then modelled for each city: all outdoor luminaires fully shielded with the current lumen amount, and fully shielded luminaires with a lumen amount scaled to 2075 lm/capita, matching Flagstaff, Arizona. The results indicate 42–88% reductions in average all-sky glow utilizing these ‘best practices’ for environmental conservation.  
  Address U.S. National Park Service Night Skies Program, Bishop, CA, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Sage Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Engligh Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition (up) Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 268  
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