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Author Cao, C.; Zong, Y.; Bai, Y.; Shao, X.
Title Preliminary study for improving the VIIRS DNB low light calibration accuracy with ground based active light source Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Proc. SPIE 9607, Earth Observing Systems XX, 2015 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 96070D
Keywords Remote sensing; Suomi NPP; VIIRS DNB; calibration
Abstract There is a growing interest in the science and user community in the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) low light detection capabilities at night for quantitative applications such as airglow, geophysical retrievals under lunar illumination, light power estimation, search and rescue, energy use, urban expansion and other human activities. Given the growing interest in the use of the DNB data, a pressing need arises for improving the calibration stability and absolute accuracy of the DNB at low radiances. Currently the low light calibration accuracy was estimated at a moderate 15%-100% while the long-term stability has yet to be characterized. This study investigates selected existing night light point sources from Suomi NPP DNB observations and evaluates the feasibility of SI traceable nightlight source at radiance levels near 3 nW·cm−2·sr−1, that potentially can be installed at selected sites for VIIRS DNB calibration/validation. The illumination geometry, surrounding environment, as well as atmospheric effects are also discussed. The uncertainties of the ground based light source are estimated. This study will contribute to the understanding of how the Earth’s atmosphere and surface variability contribute to the stability of the DNB measured radiances, and how to separate them from instrument calibration stability. It presents the need for SI traceable active light sources to monitor the calibration stability, radiometric and geolocation accuracy, and point spread functions of the DNB. Finally, it is also hoped to address whether or not active light sources can be used for detecting environmental changes, such as aerosols.
Address NESDIS/STAR, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SPIE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1261
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Author Gaughan, A. E., Oda, T., Sorichetta, A., Stevens, F. R., Bondarenko, M., Bun, R., Krauser, L., Yetman, G., & Nghiem, S. V.
Title Evaluating nighttime lights and population distribution as proxies for mapping anthropogenic CO2 emission in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Research Communications Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 9 Pages (down) 091006
Keywords Remote Sensing; greenhouse gas emissions; GHG; Asia; Vietnam; Cambodia; Laos; nighttime light
Abstract Tracking spatiotemporal changes in GHG emissions is key to successful implementation of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). And while emission inventories often provide a robust tool to track emission trends at the country level, subnational emission estimates are often not reported or reports vary in robustness as the estimates are often dependent on the spatial modeling approach and ancillary data used to disaggregate the emission inventories. Assessing the errors and uncertainties of the subnational emission estimates is fundamentally challenging due to the lack of physical measurements at the subnational level. To begin addressing the current performance of modeled gridded CO2 emissions, this study compares two common proxies used to disaggregate CO2 emission estimates. We use a known gridded CO2 model based on satellite-observed nighttime light (NTL) data (Open Source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, ODIAC) and a gridded population dataset driven by a set of ancillary geospatial data. We examine the association at multiple spatial scales of these two datasets for three countries in Southeast Asia: Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos and characterize the spatiotemporal similarities and differences for 2000, 2005, and 2010. We specifically highlight areas of potential uncertainty in the ODIAC model, which relies on the single use of NTL data for disaggregation of the non-point emissions estimates. Results show, over time, how a NTL-based emissions disaggregation tends to concentrate CO2 estimates in different ways than population-based estimates at the subnational level. We discuss important considerations in the disconnect between the two modeled datasets and argue that the spatial differences between data products can be useful to identify areas affected by the errors and uncertainties associated with the NTL-based downscaling in a region with uneven urbanization rates.
Address University of Louisville, Department of Geography and Geosciences, Louisville, KY, United States of America; ae.gaughan(at)louisville.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2727
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Author Elvidge, C.; Pettit, D.; Imhoff, M.; Nemani, R.; Pack, D.; Cinzano, P.
Title Observational considerations for moderate resolution nighttime lights Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication In Optical Engineering+ Applications Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 70810V–70810V
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract A concept has been developed for a satellite sensor system capable of global observation of the location, extent and brightness of night-time lights at a spatial resolution suitable for the delineation of primary features within human settlements. Nightsat should be capable of producing a complete cloud-free global map of lights on an annual basis. We have used a combination field spectra of outdoor lighting, moderate resolution color photography of cities at night from the International Space Station, and high-resolution airborne camera imagery acquired at night to define a range of spatial, spectral, and detection limit options for a future Nightsat mission. Primary findings of our study are that Nightsat should collect data from a near-synchronous orbit in the mid-evening with 50 to 100 m spatial resolution, detection limits in the range of 10-8 watts/cm2/sr/um, and a capacity for in-flight radiometric calibration. Although panchromatic low-light imaging data would be useful, multispectral low-light imaging data would provide valuable information on the type or character of lighting; potentially stronger predictors of variables, such as ambient population density and economic activity. The Nightsat mission concept is unique in its focus on observing a human activity, in contrast to traditional Earth observing systems that focus on natural systems.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 934
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Author Huss, A.; van Wel, L.; Bogaards, L.; Vrijkotte, T.; Wolf, L.; Hoek, G.; Vermeulen, R.
Title Shedding Some Light in the Dark-A Comparison of Personal Measurements with Satellite-Based Estimates of Exposure to Light at Night among Children in the Netherlands Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 127 Issue 6 Pages (down) 67001
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract BACKGROUND: Exposure to light at night (LAN) can perturb the biological clock and affect sleep and health. Previous epidemiological studies have evaluated LAN levels measured by satellites, but the validity of this measure as a proxy for personal LAN exposure is unclear. In addition, outdoor satellite-measured LAN levels are higher in urban environments, which means that this measure could potentially represent a proxy for other, likely urban, environmental exposures. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated correlations of satellite-assessed LAN with measured bedroom light levels and explored correlations with other environmental exposures, in particular, air pollution, green space, and area-level socioeconomic position (SEP). METHODS: We compared satellite measurements with evening and nighttime bedroom measurements of illuminance (in units of lux) for 256 children, and we evaluated correlations between satellite-based measures and other urban exposures such as air pollution, area-level SEP, and surrounding green space for 3,021 children. RESULTS: Satellite-measured LAN levels (nanowatts per centimeter squared per steradian) were not correlated with measured evening or nighttime lux levels [Spearman correlation coefficients ([Formula: see text]) [Formula: see text] to 0.04]. There was a weak correlation with measurements during the darkest time period if parents and their children reported that outdoor light sometimes or usually influenced indoor light levels ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]). In contrast, satellite-measured LAN levels were correlated with air pollution ([Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] with [Formula: see text]), and surrounding green space ([Formula: see text] for green space within [Formula: see text] of the home). A weak correlation with area-level SEP was also observed ([Formula: see text]). CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor satellite-assessed outdoor LAN exposure levels were correlated with urban environmental exposures, but they were not a good proxy for indoor evening or nighttime personal exposure as measured in our study population of 12-y-old children. Studies planning to evaluate potential risks from LAN should consider such modifying factors as curtains and indoor lighting and the use of electronic devices and should include performing indoor or personal measurements to validate any exposure proxies. The moderate-to-strong correlation of outdoor LAN with other environmental exposures should be accounted for in epidemiological investigations. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP3431.
Address 4 Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht , Utrecht, Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31157976 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2532
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Author Zhou, Y.; Smith, S.J.; Zhao, K.; Imhoff, M.; Thomson, A.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Asrar, G.R.; Zhang, X.; He, C.; Elvidge, C.D.
Title A global map of urban extent from nightlights Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Environmental Research Letters Abbreviated Journal Environ. Res. Lett.
Volume 10 Issue 5 Pages (down) 054011
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urbanization, a major driver of global change, profoundly impacts our physical and social world, for example, altering not just water and carbon cycling, biodiversity, and climate, but also demography, public health, and economy. Understanding these consequences for better scientific insights and effective decision-making unarguably requires accurate information on urban extent and its spatial distributions. We developed a method to map the urban extent from the defense meteorological satellite program/operational linescan system nighttime stable-light data at the global level and created a new global 1 km urban extent map for the year 2000. Our map shows that globally, urban is about 0.5% of total land area but ranges widely at the regional level, from 0.1% in Oceania to 2.3% in Europe. At the country level, urbanized land varies from about 0.01 to 10%, but is lower than 1% for most (70%) countries. Urbanization follows land mass distribution, as anticipated, with the highest concentration between 30° N and 45° N latitude and the largest longitudinal peak around 80° W. Based on a sensitivity analysis and comparison with other global urban area products, we found that our global product of urban areas provides a reliable estimate of global urban areas and offers the potential for producing a time-series of urban area maps for temporal dynamics analyses.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1748-9326 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1174
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