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Author Lu, L.; Weng, Q.; Xie, Y.; Guo, H.; Li, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An assessment of global electric power consumption using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages (down) 116351  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy; electric power consumption; Night lights  
  Abstract Industrialization and urbanization have led to a remarkable increase of electric power consumption (EPC) during the past decades. To assess the changing patterns of EPC at the global scale, this study utilized nighttime lights in conjunction with population and built-up datasets to map EPC at 1 km resolution. Firstly, the inter-calibrated nighttime light data were enhanced using the V4.0 Gridded Population Density data and the Global Human Settlement Layer. Secondly, linear models were calibrated to relate EPC to the enhanced nighttime light data; these models were then employed to estimate per-pixel EPC in 2000 and 2013. Finally, the spatiotemporal patterns of EPC between the periods were analyzed at the country, continental, and global scales. The evaluation of the EPC estimation shows a reasonable accuracy at the provincial scale with R2 of 0.8429. Over 30% of the human settlements in Asia, Europe, and North America showed apparent EPC growth. At the national scale, moderate and high EPC growth was observed in 45% of the built-up areas in East Asia. The spatial clustering patterns revealed that EPC decreased in Russia and the Western Europe. This study provides fresh insight into the spatial pattern and variations of global electric power consumption.  
  Address Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Science, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100094, PR China; qweng(at)indstate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2701  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, S.; Cheng, L.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Wu, J.; Li, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title City type-oriented modeling electric power consumption in China using NPP-VIIRS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages (down) 116040  
  Keywords Energy; Remote Sensing; China; electric power consumption; Night lights; Nighttime light; VIIRS-DNB  
  Abstract Accelerating urbanization has created tremendous pressure on the global environment and energy supply, making accurate estimates of energy use of great importance. Most current models for estimating electric power consumption (EPC) from nighttime light (NTL) imagery are oversimplified, ignoring influential social and economic factors. Here we propose first classifying cities by economic focus and then separately estimating each category’s EPC using NTL data. We tested this approach using statistical employment data for 198 Chinese cities, 2015 NTL data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and annual electricity consumption statistics. We used cluster analysis of employment by sector to divide the cities into three types (industrial, service, and technology and education), then established a linear regression model for each city's NTL and EPC. Compared with the estimation results before city classification (R2: 0.785), the R2 of the separately modeled service cities and technology and education cities increased to 0.866 and 0.830, respectively. However, the results for industrial cities were less consistent due to their more complex energy consumption structure. In general, using classification before modeling helps reflect factors affecting the relationship between EPC and NTL, making the estimation process more reasonable and improving the accuracy of the results.  
  Address School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2672  
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Author Ehrlich, D.; Schiavina, M.; Pesaresi, M.; Kemper, T. url  doi
isbn  openurl
  Title Detecting spatial pattern of inequalities from remote sensing – Towards mapping of deprived communities and poverty Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication EUR 29465 EN Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages (down) JRC113941  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Spatial inequalities across the globe are not easy to detect and satellite data have shown to be of use in this task. Earth Observation (EO) data combined with other information sources can provide complementary information to those derived from traditional methods. This research shows patterns of inequalities emerging by combining global night lights measured from Earth Observation, population density and built-up in 2015. The focus of the paper is to describe the spatial patterns that emerge by combing the three variables. This work focuses on processing EO data to derive information products, and in combining built-up- and population density with night-time lights emission. The built-up surface was derived entirely from remote sensing archives using artificial intelligence and pattern recognition techniques. The built-up was combined with population census data to derive population density. Also the night-time lights emission data were available from EO satellite sensors. The three layers are subsequently combined as three colour compositions based on the three primary colours (i.e. red, green and blue) to display the “spatial human settlement pattern” maps. These GHSL nightlights provide insights in inequalities across the globe. Many patterns seem to be associated with countries income. Typically, high income countries are very well lit at night, low income countries are poorly lit at night. All larger cities of the world are lit at night, those in low-income countries are often less well lit than cites in high-income countries. There are also important differences in nightlights emission in conflict areas, or along borders of countries. This report provides a selected number of patterns that are described at the regional, national and local scale. However, in depth analysis would be required to assess more precisely that relation between wealth access to energy and countries GDP, for example. This work also addresses regional inequality in GHSL nightlights in Slovakia. The country was selected to address the deprivation of the Roma minority community. The work aims to relate the information from the GHSL nightlights with that collected from field survey and census information conducted at the national level. Socio-economic data available at subnational level was correlated with nightlight. The analysis shows that despite the potential of GHSL nightlights in identifying deprived areas, the measurement scale of satellite derived nightlights at 375 x 375 m to 750 x 750 m pixel size is too coarse to capture the inequalities of deprived communities that occur at finer scale. In addition, in the European context, the gradient of inequality is not strong enough to produce strong evidence. Although there is a specific pattern of GHSL nightlights in settlements with high Roma presence, this cannot be used to identify such areas among the others. This work is part of the exploratory data analysis conducted within the GHSL team. The exploratory analysis will be followed by more quantitative assessments that will be available in future work.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher European Union Place of Publication Luxembourg Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-92-79-97528-8 Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2821  
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Author Li, M.; Koks, E.; Taubenböck, H.; van Vliet, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Continental-scale mapping and analysis of 3D building structure Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 245 Issue Pages (down) 111859  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Urban land use is often characterized based on the presence of built-up land, while the land use intensity of different locations is ignored. This narrow focus is at least partially due to a lack of data on the vertical dimension of urban land. The potential of Earth observation data to fill this gap has already been shown, but this has not yet been applied at large spatial scales. This study aims to map urban 3D building structure, i.e. building footprint, height, and volume, for Europe, the US, and China using random forest models. Our models perform well, as indicated by R2 values of 0.90 for building footprint, 0.81 for building height, and 0.88 for building volume, for all three case regions combined. In our multidimensional input variables, we find that built-up density derived from the Global Urban Footprint (GUF) is the most important variable for estimating building footprint, while backscatter intensity of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most important variable for estimating building height. A combination of the two is essential to estimate building volume. Our analysis further highlights the heterogeneity of 3D building structure across space. Specifically, buildings in China tend to be taller on average (10.35 m) compared to Europe (7.37 m) and the US (6.69 m). At the same time, the building volume per capita in China is lowest, with 302.3 m3 per capita, while Europe and the US show estimates of 404.6 m3 and 565.4 m3, respectively. The results of this study (3D building structure data for Europe, the US, and China) are publicly available, and can be used for further analysis of urban environment, spatial planning, and land use projections.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2918  
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Author Wang, J.; Zhou, M.; Xu, X.; Roudini, S.; Sander, S.P.; Pongetti, T.J.; Miller, S.D.; Reid, J.S.; Hyer, E.; Spurr, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Development of a nighttime shortwave radiative transfer model for remote sensing of nocturnal aerosols and fires from VIIRS Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 241 Issue Pages (down) 111727  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The launch of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on board the Sumo-NPP satellite in 2011 ushered in a new era of using visible light and shortwave radiation at night to characterize aerosol and fire distributions from space. In order to exploit the full range of unprecedented observational capabilities of VIIRS, we have developed a nighttime shortwave radiative transfer model capability in the UNified and Linearized Radiative Transfer Model (UNL-VRTM). This capability is based on the use of additional source functions to treat illumination from the Moon, from fires, and from artificial lights. We have applied this model to address fundamental questions associated with the VIIRS sensing of aerosol and fire at night. Detailed description of model developments and validation (either directly with surface measurements of lunar spectra or indirectly through cross validation) are presented. Our analysis reveals that: (a) when convolution with the broad-range (500–900 nm) relative spectral response (RSR) function of the VIIRS Day-Night Band (DNB) is omitted, AOD retrieval from the DNB have uncertainties up to a factor of two in conditions with low or moderate AOD (<0.5 in mid-visible); (b) using a wavelength independent spectrum for the surface illumination source can lead to an AOD bias of −10% over surfaces illuminated by light-emitting diodes and fluorescent lamps, and −30% illuminated by high-pressure sodium lamps; and (c) a DNB-equivalent narrow band for AOD retrieval over the surfaces illuminated by the three types of bulbs studied in this paper is found to be centered at 585 nm at which the look-up table can be generated for AOD retrieval from DNB. Furthermore, while uncertainty in AOD retrievals from the DNB decreases as AOD increases, fire characterization can be affected by AOD; for a smoke-scenario AOD of 2.0, the DNB and SWIR (1.6 μm) radiances can be reduced by 50% depending on the fire area fraction and temperature within VIIRS pixel. DNB is overall more sensitive to smaller and cooler fires than SWIR and can be used to retrieve AOD over bright surfaces. Finally, three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer effects and the non-collimated nature of most artificial light sources are neglected in this 1D radiative transfer (plane-parallel) model, resulting in possibly large uncertainties (e.g., the inability to reproduce side-illumination of clouds by city lights) that should be studied in future.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2863  
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