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Author Steinkraus, A. url  openurl
  Title Investigating the Carbon Leakage Effect on the Environmental Kuznets Curve Using Luminosity Data Type Report
  Year 2017 Publication Environment and Development Economics Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 22 Issue 6 Pages 747-770  
  Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper studies the effect of carbon leakage on the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) using satellite nighttime light data. I show that nighttime lighting is an important variable for estimating carbon dioxide emissions that is superior to other existing indicators and covers all countries in the world. I find evidence of an inverted-U shaped relationship between light and, thus, greenhouse gas emissions and income, with a turning point at approximately US $50,000. However, the relationship is primarily driven by changes in the structure of international trade, implying strong carbon leakage effects. Consequently, environmental regulations that become operative in only one part of the world may fail without global coordination.  
  Address Institute of Economics, TU Braunschweig, SpielmannstraÃ?e 9, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany; a.steinkraus(at)tu-braunschweig.de  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EconStor Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1366  
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Author Martinez, L. R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How Much Should We Trust the Dictator's GDP Estimates? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal SSRN  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract I study the manipulation of GDP statistics in weak and non-democracies. I show that the elasticity of official GDP figures to nighttime lights is systematically larger in more authoritarian regimes. This autocracy gradient in the night-lights elasticity of GDP cannot be explained by differences in a wide range of factors that may affect the mapping of night lights to GDP, such as economic structure, statistical capacity, rates of urbanization or electrification. The gradient is larger when there is a stronger incentive to exaggerate economic performance (years of low growth, before elections or after becoming ineligible for foreign aid) and is only present for GDP sub-components that rely on government information and have low third-party verification. The results indicate that yearly GDP growth rates are inflated by a factor of between 1.15 and 1.3 in the most authoritarian regimes. Correcting for manipulation substantially changes our understanding of comparative economic performance at the turn of the XXI century.  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1926  
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Author Amavilah, V.H. url  openurl
  Title Artificial nighttime lights and the “real” well-being of nations : “Measuring economic growth from outer space” and welfare from right here on Earth Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Economics and Political Economy Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 209-218  
  Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract GDP remains too much of an imprecise measure of the standard of living. There

is a need for either substitutes or complements. Nighttime lights are a reasonable indicator of the extent, scale, and intensity of socio-economic activities, but a poor measure of national welfare. However, if nighttime lights are understood to constitute externalities, then their effects can be used to adjust measured growth for welfare. From that angle, nighttime lights appear to exert sub-optimal positive externalities in developing countries, and supra-optimal negative externality in developed countries. This means that even if we assume equal growth rates in developing and developed countries, welfare is enhanced by increasing nighttime lights in developing countries and reduced by increasing nighttime lights in developed countries.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2099  
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Author Omar, N. S., & Ismal, A. doi  openurl
  Title Night Lights and Economic Performance in Egypt Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Advances in Economics and Business Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 69-81  
  Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract This paper, to the best of my knowledge, is the first to estimate the association between Nighttime Lights (NTL) and real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at the national level, using sub-national GDP data for the 27 Egyptian governorates over FY08-FY13. The study finds that NTL has a positive and statistically significant

correlation with GDP at the sub-national and national levels. Hence, NTL can measure and predict GDP in Egypt, at the national and sub-national levels. These findings affirm most previous research that NTL could be a good proxy for GDP when official data are unavailable or time infrequent in developing countries.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2301  
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Author Lazar, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shedding Light on the Global Distribution of Economic Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication The Open Geography Journal Abbreviated Journal Togeogj  
  Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 147-160  
  Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Collection of data on economic variables, especially sub-national income levels, is problematic, due to various shortcomings in the data collection process. Additionally, the informal economy is often excluded from official statistics. Nighttime lights satellite imagery and the LandScan population grid provide an alternative means for measuring economic activity. We have developed a model for creating a disaggregated map of estimated total (formal plus informal) economic activity for countries and states of the world. Regression models were developed to calibrate the sum of lights to official measures of economic activity at the sub-national level for China, India, Mexico, and the United States and at the national level for other countries of the world, and subsequently unique coefficients were derived. Multiplying the unique coefficients with the sum of lights provided estimates of total economic activity, which were spatially distributed to generate a spatially disaggregated 1 km2 map of total economic activity.  
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  ISSN 1874-9232 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2440  
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