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Author Chen, B.; Shi, G.; Wang, B.; Zhao, J.; Tan, S.
Title Estimation of the anthropogenic heat release distribution in China from 1992 to 2009 Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Acta Meteorologica Sinica Abbreviated Journal Acta Meteorol Sin
Volume 26 Issue 4 Pages 507-515
Keywords (up) DMSP/OLS; estimation; distribution; anthropogenic heat flux; China; remote sensing
Abstract Stable light data from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)/Operational Linescan System (OLS) satellites and authoritative energy consumption data distributed by National Bureau of Statistics of China were applied to estimating the distribution of anthropogenic heat release in China from 1992 to 2009. A strong linear relationship was found between DMSP/OLS digital number data and anthropogenic heat flux density (AHFD). The results indicate that anthropogenic heat release in China was geographically concentrated and was fundamentally correlated with economic activities. The anthropogenic heat release in economically developed areas in northern, eastern, and southern China was much larger than other regions, whereas it was very small in northwestern and southwestern China. The mean AHFD in China increased from 0.07 W m−2 in 1978 to 0.28 W m−2 in 2008. The results indicate that in the anthropogenic heat-concentrated regions of Beijing, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta, the AHFD levels were much higher than the average. The effect of aggravating anthropogenic heat release on climate change deserves further investigation.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0894-0525 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 215
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Author Davies, T.W.; McKee, D.; Fishwick, J.; Tidau, S.; Smyth, T.
Title Biologically important artificial light at night on the seafloor Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 12545
Keywords (up) Ecology; Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract Accelerating coastal development is increasing the exposure of marine ecosystems to nighttime light pollution, but is anthropogenic light reaching the seafloor in sufficient quantities to have ecological impacts? Using a combination of mapping, and radiative transfer modelling utilising in situ measurements of optical seawater properties, we quantified artificial light exposure at the sea surface, beneath the sea surface, and at the sea floor of an urbanised temperate estuary bordered by an LED lit city. Up to 76% of the three-dimensional seafloor area was exposed to biologically important light pollution. Exposure to green wavelengths was highest, while exposure to red wavelengths was nominal. We conclude that light pollution from coastal cities is likely having deleterious impacts on seafloor ecosystems which provide vital ecosystem services. A comprehensive understanding of these impacts is urgently needed.
Address Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, Devon, Plymouth, PL1 3DH, UK
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32719492; PMCID:PMC7385152 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3071
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Author Bergs, R.
Title Exploring the Spatial Economy by Night Type Report
Year 2016 Publication n/a Abbreviated Journal n/a
Volume n/a Issue n/a Pages n/a
Keywords (up) Economics; DMSP; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; spatial distribution
Abstract Night satellite images may offer an interesting tool to generate socio-economically relevant data and to analyse the evolution of space, e.g. cities or rural areas, and how spatial units interact over time. This paper is just an essay with preliminary ideas for discussion; the approach is explorative-methodological rather than one putting an empirical focus on a defined research item. Empirics discussed in this paper are just various examples collected from tinkering.

The DMSP-OLS images and adequate image analysis software such as ImageJ (in some cases to be complemented by further statistics software) provide a useful perspective for the analysis of spatial change. Since there is a stable and significant correlation between social and economic variables (population density, GDP PPP) and luminosity, such image analyses contain important information on spatial economic development. Analysis of night imagery is certainly not adequate to replace the statistical analysis of regional data, but it is a good tool to confirm and illustrate patterns of spatial heterogeneity and spatial dependence over time.
Address PRAC – Bergs & Issa Partnership Co., Bad Soden, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher n/a Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Planung & Forschung Spolicy Research & Consultancy Discussion Paper Series Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN n/a ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1392
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Author Steinkraus, A.
Title Investigating the Carbon Leakage Effect on the Environmental Kuznets Curve Using Luminosity Data Type Report
Year 2017 Publication Environment and Development Economics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue 6 Pages 747-770
Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract This paper studies the effect of carbon leakage on the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) using satellite nighttime light data. I show that nighttime lighting is an important variable for estimating carbon dioxide emissions that is superior to other existing indicators and covers all countries in the world. I find evidence of an inverted-U shaped relationship between light and, thus, greenhouse gas emissions and income, with a turning point at approximately US $50,000. However, the relationship is primarily driven by changes in the structure of international trade, implying strong carbon leakage effects. Consequently, environmental regulations that become operative in only one part of the world may fail without global coordination.
Address Institute of Economics, TU Braunschweig, SpielmannstraÃ?e 9, 38106 Braunschweig, Germany; a.steinkraus(at)tu-braunschweig.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher EconStor Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1366
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Author Martinez, L. R.
Title How Much Should We Trust the Dictator's GDP Estimates? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Abbreviated Journal SSRN
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract I study the manipulation of GDP statistics in weak and non-democracies. I show that the elasticity of official GDP figures to nighttime lights is systematically larger in more authoritarian regimes. This autocracy gradient in the night-lights elasticity of GDP cannot be explained by differences in a wide range of factors that may affect the mapping of night lights to GDP, such as economic structure, statistical capacity, rates of urbanization or electrification. The gradient is larger when there is a stronger incentive to exaggerate economic performance (years of low growth, before elections or after becoming ineligible for foreign aid) and is only present for GDP sub-components that rely on government information and have low third-party verification. The results indicate that yearly GDP growth rates are inflated by a factor of between 1.15 and 1.3 in the most authoritarian regimes. Correcting for manipulation substantially changes our understanding of comparative economic performance at the turn of the XXI century.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1926
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