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Author Roy Chowdhury, P.K.; Maithani, S.; Dadhwal, V.K.
Title Estimation of urban population in Indo-Gangetic Plains using night-time OLS data Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 2498-2515
Keywords DMSP-OLS; satellite; remote sensing; Indo-Gangetic Plains; Urban Population; Urban environment
Abstract In this study the applicability of a night-time Operational Linescan System (OLS) sensor in urban population estimation has been examined. The study area consisted of the Indian portion of the Indo-Gangetic Plains. Using night-time OLS data, urban areas situated in the study area were mapped and their areal extent was determined. A linear relationship between the natural log of the urban area and the natural log of the corresponding population was established. The model was calibrated for the year 2001 and then validated for the year 1995. Subsequently, the model was modified using ancillary factors such as electricity consumption to reduce the error in population estimation. Thus, this study attempted to explore the applicability of nighttime OLS data in urban population estimation.
Address Indian Institute of Remote Sensing , Dehradun, 248 001, India
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ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 226
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Author Small, C.; Elvidge, C.D.
Title Mapping Decadal Change in Anthropogenic Night Light Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Procedia Environmental Sciences Abbreviated Journal Procedia Environmental Sciences
Volume 7 Issue Pages 353-358
Keywords night light; urban; development; EOF analysis; PCA; Zipf; spatial network; fractal; percolation; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; satellite; light at night
Abstract The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) sensors have imaged emitted light from Earth's surface since the 1970's. Temporal overlap in the missions of 5 OLS sensors allows for intercalibration of the annual composites over the past 19 years [1]. The resulting image time series captures a spatiotemporal signature of human settlement growth and evolution. We use temporal Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis to characterize and quantify patterns of temporal change in stable night light brightness and spatial extent since 1992. Temporal EOF analysis provides a statistical basis for representing spatially abundant temporal patterns in the image time series as uncorrelated vectors of brightness as a function of time from 1992 to 2009. The variance partition of the eigenvalue spectrum combined with temporal structure of the EOFs provides a basis for distinguishing between deterministic temporal trends and stochastic year to year variance. The low order EOFs and Principal Components (PC) space together discriminate both earlier (1990s) and later (2000s) increases and decreases in brightness. Inverse transformation of these low order dimensions reduces stochastic variance sufficiently so that tri-temporal composites depict deterministic decadal trends. The most pronounced changes occur in Asia. Throughout Asia a variety of different patterns of brightness increase are visible in tri-temporal brightness composites – as well as some conspicuous areas of apparently decreasing background luminance and, in many places, intermittent light suggesting development of infrastructure rather than persistently lighted development. Vicarious validation using higher resolution imagery reveals multiple phases of urban growth in several cities, numerous instances of highway construction, extensive terracing networks and hydroelectric dam construction [3]. Lights also allow us to quantify the size distribution and connectedness of different intensities of development. Over a wide range of brightnesses, size distributions of spatially contiguous lighted area are well-fit by power laws with exponents near -1 as predicted by Zipf's Law. However, the larger lighted segments are much larger than individual cities; they correspond to vast spatial networks of contiguous development.
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ISSN 1878-0296 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 227
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Author Zeng, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, S.; Yan, F.; Zhao, Q.
Title Population spatialization in China based on night-time imagery and land use data Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 32 Issue 24 Pages 9599-9620
Keywords DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; light at night; population; modeling
Abstract Population is a key indicator of socioeconomic development, urban planning and environmental protection, particularly for developing countries like China. But, census data for any given area are neither always available nor adequately reflect the internal differences of population. The authors tried to overcome this problem by spatializing the population across China through utilizing integer night-time imagery (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System, DMSP/OLS) and land-use data. In creating the population linear regression model, night-time light intensity and lit areas, under different types of land use, were employed as predictor variables, and census data as dependent variables. To improve model performance, eight zones were created using night-time imagery clustering and shortest path algorithm. The population model is observed to have a coefficient of determination (R 2) ranging from 0.80 to 0.95 in the research area, which remained the same in different years. A comparison of the results of this study with those of other researchers shows that the spatialized population density map, prepared on the basis of night-time imagery, reflects the population distribution character more explicitly and in greater detail.
Address State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science , Jointly Sponsored by the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Normal University , Beijing, 100101, PR China
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Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 228
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Author Townsend, A.C.; Bruce, D.A.
Title The use of night-time lights satellite imagery as a measure of Australia's regional electricity consumption and population distribution Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 31 Issue 16 Pages 4459-4480
Keywords DMSP-OLS; light at night; remote sensing; satellite; skyglow
Abstract Satellite imagery of night-time lights provided by the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), using the Operational Linescan System (OLS), has been used to estimate the spatial distribution of electricity consumption throughout Australia. For the period 1997 to 2002, there was very high correlation between state electricity consumption and night-time lights with an R 2 value of 0.9346 at the state and territory spatial resolution. To increase the accuracy at which electricity consumption can be estimated at greater spatial resolution, an Overglow Removal Model (ORM) was developed to overcome the overglow effect caused by the dispersion of light into surrounding areas. The ORM makes use of the relationship between light source strength and the overglow/dispersion distance from the light source. As electricity consumption statistics at a greater spatial resolution than the state or territory level are not publically available in Australia, population statistics at the statistical local area (SLA) were used to demonstrate the increased accuracy of the ORM at returning the overglow light to its source, and, in turn, the accuracy of measuring electricity consumption. The ORM enabled an estimation of the electricity consumption of SLAs, greater than 10 km2, with an R 2 value of 0.8732, which is a 25.4% increase in accuracy over untreated data before applying the ORM. The increase in accuracy of the location of the origin of night-time lights can enable better georeferencing of satellite imagery of night-time lights and greater accuracy in locating population centres and centres of economic development, and assist with electricity infrastructure planning in regions of the world where statistics are not readily available. The result of the ORM is a map of Australian electricity consumption, and an estimation of the regional electricity consumption for all SLAs greater than 10 km2 in size is included.
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Language (up) Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 230
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Author Sutton, P.C.
Title A scale-adjusted measure of “Urban sprawl” using nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages 353-369
Keywords Urban sprawl; Sprawl Line; Nighttime satellite imagery; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; satellite; llight at night
Abstract “Urban Sprawl” is a growing concern of citizens, environmental organizations, and governments. Negative impacts often attributed to urban sprawl are traffic congestion, loss of open space, and increased pollutant runoff into natural waterways. Definitions of “Urban Sprawl” range from local patterns of land use and development to aggregate measures of per capita land consumption for given contiguous urban areas (UA). This research creates a measure of per capita land use consumption as an aggregate index for the spatially contiguous urban areas of the conterminous United States with population of 50,000 or greater. Nighttime satellite imagery obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP OLS) is used as a proxy measure of urban extent. The corresponding population of these urban areas is derived from a grid of the block group level data from the 1990 U.S. Census. These numbers are used to develop a regression equation between Ln(Urban Area) and Ln(Urban Population). The ‘scale-adjustment’ mentioned in the title characterizes the “Urban Sprawl” of each of the urban areas by how far above or below they are on the “Sprawl Line” determined by this regression. This “Sprawl Line” allows for a more fair comparison of “Urban Sprawl” between larger and smaller metropolitan areas because a simple measure of per capita land consumption or population density does not account for the natural increase in aggregate population density that occurs as cities grow in population. Cities that have more “Urban Sprawl” by this measure tended to be inland and Midwestern cities such as Minneapolis–St. Paul, Atlanta, Dallas–Ft. Worth, St. Louis, and Kansas City. Surprisingly, west coast cities including Los Angeles had some of the lowest levels of “Urban Sprawl” by this measure. There were many low light levels seen in the nighttime imagery around these major urban areas that were not included in either of the two definitions of urban extent used in this study. These areas may represent a growing commuter-shed of urban workers who do not live in the urban core but nonetheless contribute to many of the impacts typically attributed to “Urban Sprawl”. “Urban Sprawl” is difficult to define precisely partly because public perception of sprawl is likely derived from local land use planning decisions, spatio-demographic change in growing urban areas, and changing values and social mores resulting from differential rates of international migration to the urban areas of the United States. Nonetheless, the aggregate measures derived here are somewhat different than similar previously used measures in that they are ‘scale-adjusted’; also, the spatial patterns of “Urban Sprawl” shown here shed some insight and raise interesting questions about how the dynamics of “Urban Sprawl” are changing.
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ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 233
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