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Author McHardy, T.M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J.S.; Miller, S.D.; Hyer, E.J.; Kuehn, R.E.
Title An improved method for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical thickness from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication (up) Atmospheric Measurement Techniques Discussions Abbreviated Journal Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss.
Volume 8 Issue 5 Pages 5147-5178
Keywords Remote Sensing; Suomi NPP; VIIRS; DNB; VIIRS DNB; aerosol optical thickness; AERONET; lidar; SEAC4RS
Abstract Using Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) data, a method, dubbed the “variance method”, is developed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical thickness (τ) values through the examination of the dispersion of radiance values above an artificial light source. Based on the improvement of a previous algorithm, this updated method derives a semi-quantitative indicator of nighttime τ using artificial light sources. Nighttime τ retrievals from the newly developed method are inter-compared with an interpolated value from late afternoon and early morning ground observations from four AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sites as well as column-integrated τ from one High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) site at Huntsville, AL during the NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign, providing full diel coverage. Sensitivity studies are performed to examine the effects of lunar illumination on VIIRS τ retrievals made via the variance method, revealing that lunar contamination may have a smaller impact than previously thought, however the small sample size of this study limits the conclusiveness thus far. VIIRS τ retrievals yield a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.60 and a root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) of 0.18 when compared against straddling daytime-averaged AERONET τ values. Preliminary results suggest that artificial light sources can be used for estimating regional and global nighttime aerosol distributions in the future.
Address Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher European Geosciences Union Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1867-8610 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1182
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Author Guetté, A.; Godet, L.; Juigner, M.; Robin, M.
Title Worldwide increase in Artificial Light At Night around protected areas and within biodiversity hotspots Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 223 Issue Pages 97-103
Keywords Remote Sensing; Ecology; Conservation
Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) has several adverse impacts on biodiversity, and it has been recently used as a proxy to monitor human encroachment on landscapes at large spatial scales. The extent to which ALAN affects protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity hotspots (BHs) remains however untested at large spatial scales. We used this proxy to assess the spatial and temporal trends in the anthropization at a global scale within and around PAs and BHs. We found that ALAN is low and stable over time within PAs, but is the highest in a first outer belt (<25 km) around PAs, and tends to increase in a second outer belt (25–75 km). In the meantime, ALAN is higher within BHs than outside, and is even the highest and increasing over time in an inner belt, close to their periphery. Our results suggest that although PAs are creating safety zones in terms of ALAN, they tend to be more and more isolated from each other by a concentric human encroachment. In contrast, BHs are submitted to an increasing human pressure, especially in their inner periphery. Overall, we suggest integrating ALAN in large-scale conservation policies.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1890
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Author Mendes, C.P.; Carreira, D.; Pedrosa, F.; Beca, G.; Lautenschlager, L.; Akkawi, P.; Bercê, W.; Ferraz, K.M.P.M.B.; Galetti, M.
Title Landscape of human fear in Neotropical rainforest mammals Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume Issue Pages In press
Keywords Animals; Remote Sensing
Abstract The landscape of fear has profound effects on the species behavior, with most organisms engaging in risk avoidance behaviors in areas perceived as riskier. Most risk avoidance behaviors, such as temporal avoidance, have severe trade-offs between foraging efficiency and risk reduction. Human activities are able to affect the species landscape of fear, by increasing mortality of individuals (i.e. hunting, roadkill) and by disruption of the clues used by the species to estimate predation risk (e.g. light pollution). In this study, we used an extensive camera-trapping and night-time light satellite imagery to evaluate whether human activities affect the diel activity patterns of 17 species of rainforest dwelling mammals. We found evidence of diel activity shifts in eight of 17 analyzed species, in which five species become 21.6 % more nocturnal and three species become 11.7% more diurnal in high disturbed areas. This activity shifts were observed for both diurnal and nocturnal species. Persecuted species (game and predators) were more susceptible to present activity shifts. Since changes in foraging activity may affect species fitness, the behavior of humans’ avoidance may be another driver of the Anthropocene defaunation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2743
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Author Al Zahrani, M.H.; Omar, A.I.; Abdoon, A.M.O.; Ibrahim, A.A.; Alhogail, A.; Elmubarak, M.; Elamin, Y.E.; AlHelal, M.A.; Alshahrani, A.M.; Abdelgader, T.M.; Saeed, I.; El Gamri, T.B.; Alattas, M.S.; Dahlan, A.A.; Assiri, A.M.; Maina, J.; Li, X.H.; Snow, R.W.
Title Cross-border movement, economic development and malaria elimination in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication (up) BMC Medicine Abbreviated Journal BMC Med
Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 98
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health
Abstract Malaria at international borders presents particular challenges with regards to elimination. International borders share common malaria ecologies, yet neighboring countries are often at different stages of the control-to-elimination pathway. Herein, we present a case study on malaria, and its control, at the border between Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Malaria program activity reports, case data, and ancillary information have been assembled from national health information systems, archives, and other related sources. Information was analyzed as a semi-quantitative time series, between 2000 and 2017, to provide a plausibility framework to understand the possible contributions of factors related to control activities, conflict, economic development, migration, and climate. The malaria recession in the Yemeni border regions of Saudi Arabia is a likely consequence of multiple, coincidental factors, including scaled elimination activities, cross-border vector control, periods of low rainfall, and economic development. The temporal alignment of many of these factors suggests that economic development may have changed the receptivity to the extent that it mitigated against surges in vulnerability posed by imported malaria from its endemic neighbor Yemen. In many border areas of the world, malaria is likely to be sustained through a complex congruence of factors, including poverty, conflict, and migration.
Address Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. rsnow@kemri-wellcome.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1741-7015 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29940950 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1948
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Author BOE.
Title Real Decreto 1560/1992, de 18 de diciembre, por el que se aprueba la Clasificaci{ó}n Nacional de Actividades Econ{ó}micas (CNAE-93). Type Report
Year 1992 Publication (up) BOE Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Spanish Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 906
Permanent link to this record