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Author Chen, J.; Zhao, F.; Zeng, N.; Oda, T.
Title Comparing a global high-resolution downscaled fossil fuel CO2 emission dataset to local inventory-based estimates over 14 global cities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Carbon Balance and Management Abbreviated Journal Carbon Balance Manag
Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 9
Keywords Remote Sensing; City CO2 emissions; Emission inventory; Fossil fuel CO2 emissions; In-boundary; Odiac
Abstract BACKGROUND: Compilation of emission inventories (EIs) for cities is a whole new challenge to assess the subnational climate mitigation effort under the Paris Climate Agreement. Some cities have started compiling EIs, often following a global community protocol. However, EIs are often difficult to systematically examine because of the ways they were compiled (data collection and emission calculation) and reported (sector definition and direct vs consumption). In addition, such EI estimates are not readily applicable to objective evaluation using modeling and observations due to the lack of spatial emission extents. City emission estimates used in the science community are often based on downscaled gridded EIs, while the accuracy of the downscaled emissions at city level is not fully assessed. RESULTS: This study attempts to assess the utility of the downscaled emissions at city level. We collected EIs from 14 major global cities and compare them to the estimates from a global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 emission data product (ODIAC) commonly used in the science research community. We made necessary adjustments to the estimates to make our comparison as reasonable as possible. We found that the two methods produce very close area-wide emission estimates for Shanghai and Delhi (< 10% difference), and reach good consistency in half of the cities examined (< 30% difference). The ODIAC dataset exhibits a much higher emission compared to inventory estimates in Cape Town (+ 148%), Sao Paulo (+ 43%) and Beijing (+ 40%), possibly related to poor correlation between nightlight intensity with human activity, such as the high-emission and low-lighting industrial parks in developing countries. On the other hand, ODIAC shows lower estimates in Manhattan (- 62%), New York City (- 45%), Washington D.C. (- 42%) and Toronto (- 33%), all located in North America, which may be attributable to an underestimation of residential emissions from heating in ODIAC's nightlight-based approach, and an overestimation of emission from ground transportation in registered vehicles statistics of inventory estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively good agreement suggests that the ODIAC data product could potentially be used as a first source for prior estimate of city-level CO2 emission, which is valuable for atmosphere CO2 inversion modeling and comparing with satellite CO2 observations. Our compilation of in-boundary emission estimates for 14 cities contributes towards establishing an accurate inventory in-boundary global city carbon emission dataset, necessary for accountable local climate mitigation policies in the future.
Address Goddard Earth Sciences Research and Technology, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, USA
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ISSN 1750-0680 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32430547 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2929
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Author Paulino, C.; Escudero, L.
Title Use of Night Satellite Imagery to Monitor the Squid Fishery in Peru Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication (up) Case study 10 of Handbook of Satellite Remote Sensing Image Interpretation: Applications for Marine Living Resources Conservation and Management Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 493
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Author Wang, H.; Li, J.; Gao, M.; Chan, T.-C.; Gao, Z.; Zhang, M.; Li, Y.; Gu, Y.; Chen, A.; Yang, Y.; Ho, H.C.
Title Spatiotemporal variability in long-term population exposure to PM2.5 and lung cancer mortality attributable to PM2.5 across the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region over 2010–2016: A multistage approach Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication (up) Chemosphere Abbreviated Journal Chemosphere
Volume in press Issue Pages 127153
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The Yangtze River Delta region (YRD) is one of the most densely populated regions in the world, and is frequently influenced by fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Specifically, lung cancer mortality has been recognized as a major health burden associated with PM2.5. Therefore, this study developed a multistage approach 1) to first create dasymetric population data with moderate resolution (1 km) by using a random forest algorithm, brightness reflectance of nighttime light (NTL) images, a digital elevation model (DEM), and a MODIS-derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), and 2) to apply the improved population dataset with a MODIS-derived PM2.5 dataset to estimate the association between spatiotemporal variability of long-term population exposure to PM2.5 and lung cancer mortality attributable to PM2.5 across YRD during 2010–2016 for microscale planning. The created dasymetric population data derived from a coarse census unit (administrative unit) were fairly matched with census data at a fine spatial scale (street block), with R2 and RMSE of 0.64 and 27,874.5 persons, respectively. Furthermore, a significant urban-rural difference of population exposure was found. Additionally, population exposure in Shanghai was 2.9–8 times higher than the other major cities (7-year average: 192,000 μg·people/m3·km2). More importantly, the relative risks of lung cancer mortality in high-risk areas were 28%–33% higher than in low-risk areas. There were 12,574–14,504 total lung cancer deaths attributable to PM2.5, and lung cancer deaths in each square kilometer of urban areas were 7–13 times higher than for rural areas. These results indicate that moderate-resolution information can help us understand the spatiotemporal variability of population exposure and related health risk in a high-density environment.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0045-6535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2938
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Author Wei, Y., Chen, Z., Xiu, C., Yu, B., & Liu, H.
Title Siting of Dark Sky Reserves in China Based on Multi-source Spatial Data and Multiple Criteria Evaluation Method Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication (up) Chinese Geographical Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-13
Keywords Conservation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing
Abstract With the rapid development of population and urbanization and the progress of lighting technology, the influence of artificial light sources has increased. In this context, the problem of light pollution has attracted wide attention. Previous studies have revealed that light pollution can affect biological living environments, human physical and mental health, astronomical observations and many other aspects. Therefore, organizations internationally have begun to advocate for measures to prevent light pollution, many of which are recognized by the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA). In addition to improving public awareness, legal protections, technical treatments and other means, the construction of Dark Sky Reserves (DSR) has proven to be an effective preventive measure. So far, as a pioneer practice in this field, the IDA has identified 11 DSRs worldwide. Based on the DA requirements for DSRs, this paper utilizes NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data and other multi-source spatial data to analyze possible DSR sites in China. The land of China was divided into more than ten thousand 30 km × 30 km fishnets, and constraint and suitable conditions were designated, respectively, as light and cloud conditions, and scale, traffic and attractiveness conditions. Using a multiple criteria evaluation, 1443 fishnets were finally selected as most suitable sites for the construction of DSRs. Results found that less than 25% of China is not subject to light pollution, and less than 13% is suitable for DSR construction, primarily in western and northern areas, including Tibet, Xinjiang, Qinghai, Gansu and Inner Mongolia.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2724
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Author Kyba, C.C.M.
Title Defense Meteorological Satellite Program data should no longer be used for epidemiological studies Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication (up) Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiology International
Volume 33 Issue 8 Pages 943-945
Keywords Commentary; Human Health; Remote Sensing
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1459
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