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Author Žiberna, I
Title REMOTE SENSING OF LIGHT POLLUTION IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Geografski pregled Abbreviated Journal
Volume 40 Issue Pages 9-20
Keywords Remote sensing
Abstract Remote sensing of light pollution in Bosnia and Herzegovina

The study deals with the problem of light pollution in Bosnia and Herzegovina in the period 2013-2017. Remotely sensed data were obtained from the Suomi NPP satellite, which is scanning the earth's surface at night. The findings and geospatial trends of light pollution in the mentioned time period are discussed on the national and municipal levels. Some areas with very high and low levels of light pollution were exposed.
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2900
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Author Yuan, X.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.; Zhou, J.; Chen, Q.
Title Filtering the NPP-VIIRS Nighttime Light Data for Improved Detection of Settlements in Africa Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 11 Issue 24 Pages 3002
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Observing and understanding changes in Africa is a hotspot in global ecological environmental research since the early 1970s. As possible causes of environmental degradation, frequent droughts and human activities attracted wide attention. Remote sensing of nighttime light provides an effective way to map human activities and assess their intensity. To identify settlements more effectively, this study focused on nighttime light in the northern Equatorial Africa and Sahel settlements to propose a new method, namely, the patches filtering method (PFM) to identify nighttime lights related to settlements from the National Polar-orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) monthly nighttime light data by separating signal components induced by biomass burning, thereby generating a new annual image in 2016. The results show that PFM is useful for improving the quality of NPP-VIIRS monthly nighttime light data. Settlement lights were effectively separated from biomass burning lights, in addition to capturing the seasonality of biomass burning. We show that the new 2016 nighttime light image can very effectively identify even small settlements, notwithstanding their fragmentation and unstable power supply. We compared the image with earlier NPP-VIIRS annual nighttime light data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI) for 2016 and the Sentinel-2 prototype Land Cover 20 m 2016 map of Africa released by the European Space Agency (ESA-S2-AFRICA-LC20). We found that the new annual nighttime light data performed best among the three datasets in capturing settlements, with a high recognition rate of 61.8%, and absolute superiority for settlements of 2.5 square kilometers or less. This shows that the method separates biomass burning signals very effectively, while retaining the relatively stable, although dim, lights of small settlements. The new 2016 annual image demonstrates good performance in identifying human settlements in sparsely populated areas toward a better understanding of human activities.
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ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2890
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Author Small, C.; Elvidge, C.D.; Balk, D.; Montgomery, M.
Title Spatial scaling of stable night lights Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 115 Issue 2 Pages 269-280
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract City size distributions, defined on the basis of population, are often described by power laws. Zipf's Law states that the exponent of the power law for rank-size distributions of cities is near −1. Verification of power law scaling for city size distributions at continental and global scales is complicated by small sample sizes, inappropriate estimation techniques, inconsistent definitions of urban extent and variations in the accuracy and spatial resolution of census administrative units. We attempt to circumvent some of these complications by using a continuous spatial proxy for anthropogenic development and treat it as a spatial complement to population distribution. We quantify the linearity and exponent of the rank-size distribution of spatially contiguous patches of stable night light over a range of brightnesses corresponding to different intensities of development. Temporally stable night lights, as measured by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Line Scanner (DMSP-OLS), provide a unique proxy for anthropogenic development. Brightness and spatial extent of emitted light are correlated to population density (Sutton et al., 2001), built area density (Elvidge et al., 2007c) and economic activity (Doll et al., 2006, Henderson et al., 2009) at global scales and within specific countries. Using a variable brightness threshold to derive spatial extent of developed land area eliminates the complication of administrative definitions of urban extent and makes it possible to test Zipf's Law in the spatial dimension for a wide range of anthropogenic development. Higher brightness thresholds generally correspond to more intense development while lower thresholds extend the lighted area to include smaller settlements and less intensively developed peri-urban and agricultural areas. Using both Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) and Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) to estimate power law linearity and exponent of the resulting rank-size distributions across a range of upper tail cutoffs, we consistently find statistically significant exponents in the range −0.95 to −1.11 with an abrupt transition to very large, extensively connected, spatial networks of development near the low light detection limit of the sensor. This range of exponents and transition are observed at both continental and global scales. The results suggest that Zipf's Law also holds for spatial extent of anthropogenic development across a range of intensities at both continental and global scales. The implication is that the dynamics of urban growth and development may be represented as spatial phase transitions when the spatial extent and intensity of development are treated as continuous variables rather than discrete entities.
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ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2889
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Author Falchetta, G.; Pachauri, S.; Byers, E.; Danylo, O.; Parkinson, S.C.
Title Satellite Observations Reveal Inequalities in the Progress and Effectiveness of Recent Electrification in Sub-Saharan Africa Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication One Earth Abbreviated Journal One Earth
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Energy poverty is widely diffused and persistent in sub-Saharan Africa. Even in areas that formally have electricity access, power consumption and supply reliability are largely inadequate. Yet, most institutional statistics fail to capture these different dimensions and rely on rapidly outdated and unwieldy household surveys. In this study, we process high-resolution population distribution maps (including demographic and migration trends), satellite-measured nighttime light, and settlement information for sub-Saharan Africa. This allows us to derive multi-dimensional estimates of electricity access over space and time and compare them with a set of published records. Our results reveal wide inequalities in the pace and quality of electrification, which cannot be observed in existing statistics. We show that the pace of electrification must more than triple to fulfill SDG 7.1.1 and discuss why electrification policy could fall short if aimed solely at boosting electricity connections.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2590-3322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2886
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Author Tong, K.P.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Heygster, G.; Kuechly, H.U.; Notholt, J.; Kolláth, Z.
Title Angular distribution of upwelling artificial light in Europe as observed by Suomi–NPP satellite Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume in press Issue Pages in press
Keywords Remote Sensing; Skyglow
Abstract Measuring the angular distribution of upwelling artificial light is important for modeling light pollution, because the direction of emission affects how light propagates in the atmosphere. We characterize the angular distributions of upwelling artificial light for Europe and northern Africa in 2018, based on night time radiance data for clear nights without twilight and moonlight from the VIIRS–DNB sensor on board the Suomi NPP satellite. We find that in general, suburban areas of major cities emit more light at larger zenith angles, whereas the opposite can be seen at the city centers, where the highest radiance is directed upward. The mean numbers of overflights for the year is 83, meaning that there are on average approximately seven suitable overflights per month. Future analysis may consider using moonlight models to compensate for the retrieval of moonlit scenes and analyzing data from different years in order to expand the amount of available data. As the VIIRS–DNB sensor on board the NOAA–20 satellite (launched 2017) has almost the same design, this method can also be extended to the data taken by NOAA–20.
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ISSN 0022-4073 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial (down) 2880
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