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Author Zhang, X.; Wu, J.; Peng, J.; Cao, Q.
Title (down) The Uncertainty of Nighttime Light Data in Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions in China: A Comparison between DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 9 Issue 8 Pages 797
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Nighttime light data can characterize urbanization, economic development, population density, energy consumption and other human activities. Additionally, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are closely related to the scope and intensity of human activities. In this study, we assess the utility of nighttime light data as a powerful tool to reflect CO2 emissions from energy consumption, analyze the uncertainty associated with different nighttime light data for modeling CO2 emissions, and provide guidance and a reference for modeling CO2 emissions based on nighttime light data. In this paper, Mainland China was taken as a case study, and nighttime light datasets (the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime light data and the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP-VIIRS) nighttime light data) as well as a global gridded CO2 emissions dataset (PKU-CO2) were used to perform simple regressions at provincial, prefectural and 0.1° × 0.1° grid levels, respectively. The analyses are aimed at exploring the accuracy and uncertainty of DMSP-OLS and NPP-VIIRS nighttime light data in modeling CO2 emissions at different spatial scales. The improvement of nighttime light index and the potential factors influencing the effects of modeling CO2 emissions based on nighttime light datasets were also explored. The results show that DMSP-OLS is superior to NPP-VIIRS in modeling CO2 emissions at all spatial scales, and the bigger the scale, the more evident the advantages of DMSP-OLS. When modeling CO2 emissions with nighttime light datasets, not only the total amount of lights within a given statistical unit but also the agglomeration degree of lights should be taken into account. Furthermore, the geographical location and socio-economic conditions at the study site, such as gross regional product per capita (GRP per capita), population, and urbanization were shown to have an impact on the regression effect of the nighttime lights-CO2 emissions model. The regression effect was found to be better at higher latitude and longitude areas with higher GRP per capita and higher urbanization, while population showed little effect on the regression effect of the nighttime lights – CO2 emissions model. The limitation of this study is that the thresholds of potential factors are unclear and the quantitative guidance is insufficient.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1710
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Author Tamir, R.; Lerner, A.; Haspel, C.; Dubinsky, Z.; Iluz, D.
Title (down) The spectral and spatial distribution of light pollution in the waters of the northern Gulf of Aqaba (Eilat) Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 7 Issue Pages 42329
Keywords Measurement; Instrumentation; Remote Sensing
Abstract The urbanization of the shores of the Gulf of Aqaba has exposed the marine environment there, including unique fringing coral reefs, to strong anthropogenic light sources. Here we present the first in situ measurements of artificial nighttime light under water in such an ecosystem, with irradiance measured in 12 wavelength bands, at 19 measurement stations spread over 44 square km, and at 30 depths down to 30-m depth. At 1-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 4.6 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) 500 m from the city to 1 x 10(-6) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the center of the gulf (9.5 km from the city) in the yellow channel (589-nm wavelength) and from 1.3 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2 )nm(-1) to 4.3 x 10(-5) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the blue channel (443-nm wavelength). Down to 10-m depth, we find downwelling irradiance values that vary from 1 x 10(-6) muW cm(-2 )nm(-1) to 4.6 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the yellow channel and from 2.6 x 10(-5) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) to 1.3 x 10(-4) muW cm(-2) nm(-1) in the blue channel, and we even detected a signal at 30-m depth. This irradiance could influence such biological processes as the tuning of circadian clocks, the synchronization of coral spawning, recruitment and competition, vertical migration of demersal plankton, feeding patterns, and prey/predator visual interactions.
Address School of Agriculture and Environmental Studies, Beit Berl College, Kfar Saba, Israel
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28186138; PMCID:PMC5301253 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1861
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Author Andrade-Núñez, M.J.; Aide, T.M.
Title (down) The Socio-Economic and Environmental Variables Associated with Hotspots of Infrastructure Expansion in South America Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 1 Pages 116
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The built environment, defined as all human-made infrastructure, is increasing to fulfill the demand for human settlements, productive systems, mining, and industries. Due to the profound direct and indirect impacts that the built environment produces on natural ecosystems, it is considered a major driver of land change and biodiversity loss, and a major component of global environmental change. In South America, a global producer of minerals and agricultural commodities, and a region with many biodiversity hotspots, infrastructure expanded considerably between 2001 and 2011. This expansion occurred mainly in rural areas, towns, and sprawling suburban areas that were not previously developed. Herein, we characterized the areas of major infrastructure expansion between 2001 and 2011 in South America. We used nighttime light data, land use maps, and socio-economic and environmental variables to answer the following questions: (1) Where are the hotspots of infrastructure expansion located? and (2) What combination of socio-economic and environmental variables are associated with infrastructure expansion? Hotspots of infrastructure expansion encompass 70% (337,310 km2) of the total infrastructure expansion occurring between 2001 and 2011 across South America. Urban population and economic growth, mean elevation, and mean road density were the main variables associated with the hotspots, grouping them into eight clusters. Furthermore, within the hotspots, woody vegetation increased around various urban centers, and several areas showed a large increase in agriculture. Investments in large scale infrastructure projects, and the expansion and intensification of productive systems (e.g., agriculture and meat production) play a dominant role in the increase of infrastructure across South America. We expect that under the current trends of globalization and land changes, infrastructure will continue increasing and expanding into no-development areas and remote places. Therefore, to fully understand the direct and indirect impacts of land use change in natural ecosystems studies of infrastructure need to expand to areas beyond cities. This will provide better land management alternatives for the conservation of biodiversity as well as peri-urban areas across South America.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2798
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Author Cheshire, C.; Antin, J.
Title (down) The Social Psychological Effects of Feedback on the Production of Internet Information Pools Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication Abbreviated Journal
Volume 13 Issue 3 Pages 705-727
Keywords Remote Sensing
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1083-6101 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 912
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Author Wallace, P. T.
Title (down) The SLALIB library Type Journal Article
Year 1994 Publication In Astronomical Data Analysis Software and Systems III Abbreviated Journal
Volume 61 Issue Pages 481
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 981
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