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Author Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature of the diffuse light near cities detected in nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue Pages 7829
Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Diffuse glow has been observed around brightly lit cities in nighttime satellite imagery since at least the first publication of large scale maps in the late 1990s. In the literature, this has often been assumed to be an error related to the sensor, and referred to as “blooming”, presumably in relation to the effect that can occur when using a CCD to photograph a bright light source. Here we show that the effect seen on the DMSP/OLS, SNPP/VIIRS-DNB and ISS is not only instrumental, but in fact represents a real detection of light scattered by the atmosphere. Data from the Universidad Complutense Madrid sky brightness survey are compared to nighttime imagery from multiple sensors with differing spatial resolutions, and found to be strongly correlated. These results suggest that it should be possible for a future space-based imaging radiometer to monitor changes in the diffuse artificial skyglow of cities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2909
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Author Li, C.; Zhu, H.; Ye, X.; Jiang, C.; Dong, J.; Wang, D.; Wu, Y.
Title Study on Average Housing Prices in the Inland Capital Cities of China by Night-time Light Remote Sensing and Official Statistics Data Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 7732
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In this paper, the annually average Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) night-time light data is first proposed as a surrogate indicator to mine and forecast the average housing prices in the inland capital cities of China. First, based on the time-series analysis of individual cities, five regression models with gross error elimination are established between average night-time light intensity (ANLI) and average commercial residential housing price (ACRHP) adjusted by annual inflation rate or not from 2002 to 2013. Next, an optimal model is selected for predicting the ACRHPs in 2014 of these capital cities, and then verified by the interval estimation and corresponding official statistics. Finally, experimental results show that the quadratic polynomial regression is the optimal mining model for estimating the ACRHP without adjustments in most provincial capitals and the predicted ACRHP of these cities are almost in their interval estimations except for the overrated Chengdu and the underestimated Wuhan, while the adjusted ACRHP is all in prediction interval. Overall, this paper not only provides a novel insight into time-series ACRHP data mining based on time-series ANLI for capital city scale but also reveals the potentiality and mechanism of the comprehensive ANLI to characterize the complicated ACRHP. Besides, other factors influencing housing prices, such as the time-series lags of government policy, are tested and analysed in this paper.
Address Key Laboratory for Geographical Process Analysing and Modelling, and College of Urban and Environmental Science, Central China Normal University, 152 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, 430079, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32382080 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2914
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Author Li, M.; Koks, E.; Taubenböck, H.; van Vliet, J.
Title Continental-scale mapping and analysis of 3D building structure Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 245 Issue Pages 111859
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Urban land use is often characterized based on the presence of built-up land, while the land use intensity of different locations is ignored. This narrow focus is at least partially due to a lack of data on the vertical dimension of urban land. The potential of Earth observation data to fill this gap has already been shown, but this has not yet been applied at large spatial scales. This study aims to map urban 3D building structure, i.e. building footprint, height, and volume, for Europe, the US, and China using random forest models. Our models perform well, as indicated by R2 values of 0.90 for building footprint, 0.81 for building height, and 0.88 for building volume, for all three case regions combined. In our multidimensional input variables, we find that built-up density derived from the Global Urban Footprint (GUF) is the most important variable for estimating building footprint, while backscatter intensity of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is the most important variable for estimating building height. A combination of the two is essential to estimate building volume. Our analysis further highlights the heterogeneity of 3D building structure across space. Specifically, buildings in China tend to be taller on average (10.35 m) compared to Europe (7.37 m) and the US (6.69 m). At the same time, the building volume per capita in China is lowest, with 302.3 m3 per capita, while Europe and the US show estimates of 404.6 m3 and 565.4 m3, respectively. The results of this study (3D building structure data for Europe, the US, and China) are publicly available, and can be used for further analysis of urban environment, spatial planning, and land use projections.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2918
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Author Cox, D.T.C.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Dzurjak, S.A.; Bennie, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title National Scale Spatial Variation in Artificial Light at Night Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 12 Issue 10 Pages 1591
Keywords Remote Sensing; United Kingdom; National parks; skyglow; VIIRS-DNB; albedo; landcover; light emissions; light pollution; protected areas; skyglow; sky brightness; urbanization
Abstract The disruption to natural light regimes caused by outdoor artificial nighttime lighting has significant impacts on human health and the natural world. Artificial light at night takes two forms, light emissions and skyglow (caused by the scattering of light by water, dust and gas molecules in the atmosphere). Key to determining where the biological impacts from each form are likely to be experienced is understanding their spatial occurrence, and how this varies with other landscape factors. To examine this, we used data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) day/night band and the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness, to determine covariation in (a) light emissions, and (b) skyglow, with human population density, landcover, protected areas and roads in Britain. We demonstrate that, although artificial light at night increases with human density, the amount of light per person decreases with increasing urbanization (with per capita median direct emissions three times greater in rural than urban populations, and per capita median skyglow eleven times greater). There was significant variation in artificial light at night within different landcover types, emphasizing that light pollution is not a solely urban issue. Further, half of English National Parks have higher levels of skyglow than light emissions, indicating their failure to buffer biodiversity from pressures that artificial lighting poses. The higher per capita emissions in rural than urban areas provide different challenges and opportunities for mitigating the negative human health and environmental impacts of light pollution.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK; d.t.c.cox(at )exeter.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher MDPI Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2920
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Author Sun, B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Gao, D.
Title Street-Scale Analysis of Population Exposure to Light Pollution Based on Remote Sensing and Mobile Big Data-Shenzhen City as a Case Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 20 Issue 9 Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Luojia 1-01; NTL remote sensing; light pollution; population exposure to light pollution; residential area
Abstract Most studies on light pollution are based on light intensity retrieved from nighttime light (NTL) remote sensing with less consideration of the population factors. Furthermore, the coarse spatial resolution of traditional NTL remote sensing data limits the refined applications in current smart city studies. In order to analyze the influence of light pollution on populated areas, this study proposes an index named population exposure to light pollution (PELP) and conducts a street-scale analysis to illustrate spatial variation of PELP among residential areas in cites. By taking Shenzhen city as a case, multi-source data were combined including high resolution NTL remote sensing data from the Luojia 1-01 satellite sensor, high-precision mobile big data for visualizing human activities and population distribution as well as point of interest (POI) data. Results show that the main influenced areas of light pollution are concentrated in the downtown and core areas of newly expanded areas with obvious deviation corrected like traditional serious light polluted regions (e.g., ports). In comparison, commercial-residential mixed areas and village-in-city show a high level of PELP. The proposed method better presents the extent of population exposure to light pollution at a fine-grid scale and the regional difference between different types of residential areas in a city.
Address TalkingData Co., Ltd., Beijing 100027, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32403250 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2921
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