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Author Barentine, J.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Methods for Assessment and Monitoring of Light Pollution around Ecologically Sensitive Sites Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Journal of Imaging Abbreviated Journal J. Imaging  
  Volume 5 Issue 5 Pages 54  
  Keywords Instrumentation; Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Review  
  Abstract Since the introduction of electric lighting over a century ago, and particularly in the decades following the Second World War, indications of artificial light on the nighttime Earth as seen from Earth orbit have increased at a rate exceeding that of world population growth during the same period. Modification of the natural photic environment at night is a clear and imminent consequence of the proliferation of anthropogenic light at night into outdoor spaces, and with this unprecedented change comes a host of known and suspected ecological consequences. In the past two decades, the conservation community has gradually come to view light pollution as a threat requiring the development of best management practices. Establishing those practices demands a means of quantifying the problem, identifying polluting sources, and monitoring the evolution of their impacts through time. The proliferation of solid-state lighting and the changes to source spectral power distribution it has brought relative to legacy lighting technologies add the complication of color to the overall situation. In this paper, I describe the challenge of quantifying light pollution threats to ecologically-sensitive sites in the context of efforts to conserve natural nighttime darkness, assess the current state of the art in detection and imaging technology as applied to this realm, review some recent innovations, and consider future prospects for imaging approaches to provide substantial support for darkness conservation initiatives around the world.  
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  ISSN 2313-433X ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2498  
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Author Andreatta, G.; Tessmar-Raible, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The still dark side of the moon: molecular mechanisms of lunar-controlled rhythms and clocks Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) Journal of Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal J Mol Biol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Review; Animals; Hormones; Lunar rhythms; Physiology; Proteome; Transcriptome  
  Abstract Starting with the beginning of the last century, a multitude of scientific studies has documented that the lunar cycle times behaviors and physiology in many organisms. It is plausible that even the first life forms adapted to the different rhythms controlled by the moon. Consistently, many marine species exhibit lunar rhythms, and also the number of documented “lunar-rhythmic” terrestrial species is increasing. Organisms follow diverse lunar geophysical/astronomical rhythms, which differ significantly in terms of period length: from hours (circalunidian and circatidal rhythms) to days (circasemilunar and circalunar cycles). Evidence for internal circatital and circalunar oscillators exists for a range of species based on past behavioral studies, but those species with well-documented behaviorally free-running lunar rhythms are not typically used for molecular studies. Thus, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely obscure: the dark side of the moon. Here we review findings which start to connect molecular pathways with moon-controlled physiology and behaviors. The present data indicate connections between metabolic/endocrine pathways and moon-controlled rhythms, as well as interactions between circadian and circatidal/circalunar rhythms. Moreover, recent high-throughput analyses provide useful leads towards pathways, as well as molecular markers. However, for each interpretation it is important to carefully consider the – partly substantially differing – conditions used in each experimental paradigm. In the future, it will be important to use lab experiments to delineate the specific mechanisms of the different solar- and lunar-controlled rhythms, but to also start integrating them together, as life has evolved equally long under rhythms of both sun and moon.  
  Address Max Perutz Labs, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna; Research Platform “Rhythms of Life”, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna. Electronic address: kristin.tessmar@mfpl.ac.at  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-2836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32198116 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2865  
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Author Touitou, Y.; Reinberg, A.; Touitou, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Association between light at night, melatonin secretion, sleep deprivation, and the internal clock: Health impacts and mechanisms of circadian disruption Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication (up) Life Sciences Abbreviated Journal Life Sci  
  Volume 173 Issue Pages 94-106  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract Exposure to Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) results in a disruption of the circadian system, which is deleterious to health. In industrialized countries, 75% of the total workforce is estimated to have been involved in shift work and night work. Epidemiologic studies, mainly of nurses, have revealed an association between sustained night work and a 50-100% higher incidence of breast cancer. The potential and multifactorial mechanisms of the effects include the suppression of melatonin secretion by ALAN, sleep deprivation, and circadian disruption. Shift and/or night work generally decreases the time spent sleeping, and it disrupts the circadian time structure. In the long run, this desynchronization is detrimental to health, as underscored by a large number of epidemiological studies that have uncovered elevated rates of several diseases, including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular risks, obesity, mood disorders and age-related macular degeneration. It amounts to a public health issue in the light of the very substantial number of individuals involved. The IARC has classified shift work in group 2A of “probable carcinogens to humans” since “they involve a circadian disorganization”. Countermeasures to the effects of ALAN, such as melatonin, bright light, or psychotropic drugs, have been proposed as a means to combat circadian clock disruption and improve adaptation to shift and night work. We review the evidence for the ALAN impacts on health. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding to combat the detrimental properties of exposure to ALAN and develop strategies of prevention.  
  Address UHSA – Groupe Hospitalier Paul Guiraud, 54, avenue de la Republique, 94806 Villejuif, France  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0024-3205 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:28214594 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2455  
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Author Anisimov, V. N. url  openurl
  Title Light desynchronosis and health Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) Light & Engineering Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 14-25  
  Keywords Human Health; Review  
  Abstract The review summarizes the modern knowledge of the impact of day-night, light-darkness rhythm disorders on the aging process and on the risk of development of the age-related conditions. Significant evidence has been obtained of that the constant artificial illumination and the daylight of the North has a stimulating effect on the occurrence and development of tumours in laboratory animals. It has been shown that long-term shift work, trans-meridian flights (jet-lag) and insomnia increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and malignancies in humans. Particular attention is given to the studies where the relationship between light intensity, light wavelength and its ability to suppress the synthesis of melatonin produced at night in the pineal gland, are investigated. It has been established that melatonin synthesis is most effectively suppressed with blue light sources of a wavelength from 446 to 477 nm. The use of exogenous melatonin prevents premature aging of the reproductive system and the body as a whole prevents the development of immune-suppression, metabolic syndrome and tumours caused by light pollution. An urgent task is to develop recommendations for optimizing the illumination of workplaces and residential premises, of cities and towns as a prevention measure for premature aging and age-related pathology, which, ultimately, will contribute to the long-term maintaining of performance and improving the quality of life.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2642  
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Author Fotios, S.; Gibbons, R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Road lighting research for drivers and pedestrians: The basis of luminance and illuminance recommendations Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication (up) Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 154-186  
  Keywords Security; Public Safety; Lighting; Review  
  Abstract This article discusses quantitative recommendations for road lighting as given in guidelines and standards, primarily, the amount of light. The discussion is framed according to the type of road user, the driver and the pedestrian, these being the user groups associated with major and minor roads, respectively. Presented first is a brief history of road lighting standards, from early to current versions, and, where known, the basis of these standards. Recommendations for the amount of light do not appear to be well-founded in robust empirical evidence, or at least do not tend to reveal the nature of any evidence. This suggests a need to reconsider recommended light levels, a need reinforced by recent developments in the science and technology of lighting and of lighting research. To enable improved recommendations, there is a need for further evidence of the effects of changes in lighting: This article therefore discusses the findings of investigations, which might be considered when developing new standards.  
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  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1790  
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