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Author (up) Metan S. S.; Kshirsagar A. R.; Samleti G. N.; Patki V. K.
Title Anti-Glare Headlamp a Safe Option for Better Vision to the Rider Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Innovative Technology and Exploring Engineering Abbreviated Journal IJITEE
Volume 8 Issue 9S2 Pages 672-678
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract As per the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways report 2018, every day around 410 road fatalities in India, which is one of the highest road crash fatalities in the world. Evaluations show that an average of 1% of nighttime fatal crash lists glare as a major contributor factor. On the multilane highway, vehicle with high glared headlamp light disturbs the approaching motorist eyes due to which the vision of the motorist gets indistinct for a few seconds causing accidents on the road.

In the present work, a novel concept of an anti-glare headlamp is proposed to avoid the temporary blindness of the motorist due to momentary high glares from approaching vehicles. The anti- glare film reduces glare and halos around headlamp light at night and eliminates unattractive reflections on the eyes. A successful attempt is made to analyze the visibility of objects in a scene by inspecting contrast reduction caused by the illuminance contribution. Our visualization of scenes with the cover-up veiling illuminance gives a good indication of the visual problems that might occur, but the images are not exactly what people perceive when observing the scene in reality.

In the present study, after number of samples, it has found that that the mixture of yellow and green color film combination on halogen bulb headlamp will give a good vision to the rider as well as glare-free effect to the approaching motorist. Visualizations with the proposed method can still improve the understanding of human vision so that visual aspects can be taken into account in design and quality assurance of head lamp.
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ISSN 2278-3075 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3162
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Author (up) Monsere, C.M.; Fischer, E.L.
Title Safety effects of reducing freeway illumination for energy conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Accident; Analysis and Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accid Anal Prev
Volume 40 Issue 5 Pages 1773-1780
Keywords Lighting; Accidents, Traffic/*statistics & numerical data; *Automobile Driving; *Conservation of Energy Resources; Environment Design; Humans; *Lighting; Models, Statistical; Oregon; Safety; Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology
Abstract The addition of illumination where none was present is generally believed to have a positive effect on motor vehicle safety; reducing the frequency, as well as the severity of crashes. The operational cost of illumination, however, can make it a candidate for conservation during periods of high energy costs. In response to a forecasted energy shortage, the Oregon Department of Transportation selectively reduced illumination on interstate highways as part of an energy-saving effort. The reductions occurred at 44 interchanges and along 5.5 miles of interstate highway. This paper presents the results of a crash-based analysis of the changes in safety performance using an empirical-Bayes observational methodology. The study found an increase in reported crashes where the lineal lighting was reduced both in total crashes (28.95%, P=0.05) and injury night crashes (39.21%, P=0.07). Where full interchange lighting was reduced to partial lighting, a 2.46% increase (P=0.007) in total night crashes was observed. Injury night crashes, however, decreased by 12.16% (P<0.001) though day injury crashes also decreased at these locations. Unexpectedly, for interchanges where illumination was reduced from partial plus to partial, a 35.24% decrease (P<0.001) in total crashes and 39.98 (P<0.001) decrease in injury night crashes was found, though again, day crashes also decreased.
Address Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, USA. monsere@pdx.edu
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:18760107 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 643
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Author (up) Morrow, E.N.; Hutton, S.A.
Title The Chicago Alley Lighting Project: Final Evaluation Report Type Journal Article
Year 2000 Publication Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract Begun in October of 1998, the first part of the plan sought to upgrade and improve the city's 175,000 streetlights, which illuminate the arterial and residential streets. The second part of the plan involved repairing and upgrading the lighting in and around viaducts and Chicago Transit Authority stations. The final part of the plan has been to boost lighting levels in alleys across the city as a tool for public safety and fighting crime. In the past, 90-watt lights illuminated most city alleys; alley lighting levels have been increased by installing new fixtures that can accommodate 250-watt bulbs. The Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority undertook an evaluation to assess the impact of increased alley lighting on crime rates in two eight-square-block areas, with emphasis on crimes that were most likely to have occurred in alleys. The evaluation first examined change in the experimental area that received increased alley lighting over a 1-year period prior to increased alley lighting and a 1-year period thereafter. Next, change over a 6-month period before and after increased alley lighting was examined for both the experimental area and the control area. The evaluation found that reported offenses increased between the 1-year preinstallation and 1-year postinstallation study period in the experimental area where alley lighting was improved. The evaluation also found that the experimental area experienced more notable increases in reported incidents over a 6-month preinstallation and 6-month postinstallation study period compared to the control area. The evaluation could not provide a definitive explanation of these findings.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 453
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Author (up) Nasar, J.L.; Bokharaei, S.
Title Impressions of Lighting in Public Squares After Dark Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Environment & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Env. & Behav.
Volume 43 Issue 3 Pages 227-254
Keywords Psychology; public lighting; public safety; security; crime; perception; outdoor lighting
Abstract Lighting may affect impressions of public squares. Following studies on office interior lighting, the present research manipulated three modes of lighting—non-uniform–uniform, peripheral–overhead, and dim–bright—in three virtual squares. One study had 32 participants (15 men, 17 women) judge the spaciousness and privacy of each of the 24 public squares. A second study had a different group of 30 participants (16 men, 14 women) rate the appeal, safety from crime, and excitement of each square. Study 1 found that judged spaciousness increased with uniform and bright lighting, and that privacy increased with non-uniform, dim, and peripheral lighting. Study 2 found that rated appeal increased with uniform and bright lighting, as did safety from crime and excitement. Across the two studies, the uniform and bright lighting conditions contributed most to the kinds of favorable experiences people might expect to have in public spaces after dark.
Address City & Regional Planning, Ohio State University, 200 Knowlton Hall 275 W Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Email: nasar.1(at)osu.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0013-9165 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1390
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Author (up) Neale, W., Marr, J., McKelvey, N., & Kuzel, M.
Title Nighttime Visibility in Varying Moonlight Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-1005 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Moonlight; Vision
Abstract When the visibility of an object or person in the roadway from a driver’s perspective is an issue, the potential effect of moonlight is sometimes questioned. To assess this potential effect, methods typically used to quantify visibility were performed during conditions with no moon and with a full moon. In the full moon condition, measurements were collected from initial moon rise until the moon reached peak azimuth. Baseline ambient light measurements of illumination at the test surface were measured in both no moon and full moon scenarios. Additionally, a vehicle with activated low beam headlamps was positioned in the testing area and the change in illumination at two locations forward of the vehicle was recorded at thirty-minute intervals as the moon rose to the highest position in the sky. Also, two separate luminance readings were recorded during the test intervals, one location 75 feet in front and to the left of the vehicle, and another 150 feet forward of the vehicle. These luminance readings yielding the change in reflected light attributable to the moon. In addition to the quantitative measurement of light contributed by the moon, documentation to the change in visibility of objects and pedestrians located on the roadway were documented through photographs. Calibrated nighttime photographs were taken from the driver’s perspective inside the vehicle with low beam headlamps activated. The photographs were analyzed after testing to determine how the light intensity of the pixels in the photographs changed at each thirty-minute interval due to the additional light contribution from the moon. The results of this testing indicate that the quantifiable change in visibility distance attributable to added moonlight was negligible, and in real-world driving situations, the effect of additional illumination from a full moon would be unlikely to affect the detection of an object or pedestrian in or near the travel lane of the roadway.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2355
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