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Author Liu, J.; Cai, J.; Lin, S.; Zhao, J.
Title Analysis of Factors Affecting a Driver’s Driving Speed Selection in Low Illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of Advanced Transportation Abbreviated Journal Journal of Advanced Transportation
Volume 2020 Issue Pages Article ID 2817801
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract To better understand a driver’s driving speed selection behaviour in low illumination, a self-designed questionnaire was applied to investigate driving ability in low illumination, and the influencing factors of low-illumination driving speed selection behaviour were discussed from the driver’s perspective. The reliability and validity of 243 questionnaires were tested, and multiple linear regression was used to analyse the comprehensive influence of demographic variables, driving speed in a low-illumination environment with street lights and driving ability on speed selection behaviour in low illumination without street lights. Pearson’s correlation test showed that there was no correlation among age, education, accidents in the past 3 years, and speed selection behaviour in low illumination, but gender, driving experience, number of night-driving days per week, and average annual mileage were significantly correlated with speed selection behaviour. In a low-illumination environment, driving ability has a significant influence on a driver’s speed selection behaviour. Technical driving ability under low-illumination conditions of street lights has the greatest influence on speed selection behaviour on a road with a speed limit of 120 km/h (β = 0.51). Risk perception ability has a significant negative impact on speed selection behaviour on roads with speed limits of 80 km/h and 120 km/h (β = −0.25 and β = −0.34, respectively). Driving speed in night-driving environment with street lights also has a positive influence on speed selection behaviour in low illumination (β = 0.61; β = 0.28; β = 0.37).
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ISSN (up) 0197-6729 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2913
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Author Lyytimäki, J.; Tapio, P.; Assmuth, T.
Title Unawareness in environmental protection: The case of light pollution from traffic Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Land Use Policy Abbreviated Journal Land Use Policy
Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 598-604
Keywords Public Safety; public policy; traffic safety
Abstract New information is often emphasized as a basis of effective and scientifically sound environmental policy and management. However, outdated or incorrect information is not automatically nor instantly replaced by new insights. This article focuses on the various ways environmental information can be unintentionally left with insufficient attention or purposefully neglected. Energy-related emissions caused by road traffic in Finland are used as an illustrative example and light pollution caused by artificial lighting is identified as an emerging issue that has gained especially low recognition in the environmental agenda. Four different reasons for this lack of recognition are discussed: recognized unawareness, false awareness, deliberate unawareness and concealed awareness. Paying attention to light pollution is important because of various ecological, socio-cultural and economic effects but also because implementing measures aimed for reducing light pollution create possibilities for alleviating other social and environmental problems in transport and land use policies.
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ISSN (up) 0264-8377 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 23
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Author Wood, J.M.
Title Nighttime driving: visual, lighting and visibility challenges Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics : the Journal of the British College of Ophthalmic Opticians (Optometrists) Abbreviated Journal Ophthalmic Physiol Opt
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Review; Public Safety; headlights; nighttime driving; older drivers; pedestrians and cyclists; streetlights; visual performance
Abstract PURPOSE: Nighttime driving is dangerous and is one of the most challenging driving situations for most drivers. Fatality rates are higher at night than in the day when adjusted for distances travelled, particularly for crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists. Although there are multiple contributory factors, the low light levels at night are believed to be the major cause of collisions with pedestrians and cyclists at night, most likely due to their reduced visibility. Understanding the visibility problems involved in nighttime driving is thus critical, given the increased risk to road safety. RECENT FINDINGS: This review discusses research that highlights key differences in the nighttime road environment compared to the day and how this affects visual function and driving performance, together with an overview of studies investigating how driver age and visual status affect nighttime driving performance. Research that has focused on the visibility of vulnerable road users at nighttime (pedestrians and cyclists) is also included. SUMMARY: Collectively, the research evidence suggests that visual function is reduced under the mesopic lighting conditions of night driving and that these effects are exacerbated by increasing age and visual impairment. Light and glare from road lighting and headlights have significant impacts on vision and night driving and these effects are likely to change with evolving technologies, such as LED streetlighting and headlights. Research also highlights the importance of the visibility of vulnerable road users at night and the role of retroreflective clothing in the 'biomotion' configuration for improving their conspicuity and hence safety.
Address School of Optometry and Vision Science and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0275-5408 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31875993 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2803
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Author Smith, L.A.; Larsen, C.A.; Johnson, K.L.
Title Are “quiet-at-night” initiatives impacting staff alertness? Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Nursing Abbreviated Journal Nursing
Volume 47 Issue 1 Pages 61-62
Keywords Public Safety; Human Health
Abstract PATIENT SATISFACTION scores have been in the national spotlight since 2007 when Medicare began to link hospital reimbursement with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores. Patients are asked to respond to this question: “During this hospital stay, how often was the area around your room quiet at night?” (Answer choices: Never, sometimes, usually, and always).1 Many hospitals, including ours, have worked diligently to improve patient satisfaction with quiet-at-night initiatives.

This article describes our quiet-at-night initiatives and concerns that these initiatives were impairing our night-shift staff's alertness. We addressed these concerns by conducting a survey; its results led us to change our initiatives to improve staff wakefulness while maintaining patient satisfaction.
Address Lisa A. Smith is an administrative nursing supervisor at Banner University Medical Center-Phoenix in Phoenix, Ariz. Charles A. Larsen is a director of nursing at Banner Baywood Medical Center and Banner Heart Hospital in Mesa, Ariz. Karen L. Johnson is director of nursing research at Banner Health in Phoenix, Ariz
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0360-4039 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:28027137 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1617
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Author Bullough, J.D.; Skinner, N.P.
Title Real-World Demonstrations of Novel Pedestrian Crosswalk Lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Abbreviated Journal Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board
Volume 2661 Issue Pages 62-68
Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Planning
Abstract Outdoor urban pedestrian lighting serves multiple purposes and should do so in the most efficient and economic manner. An important purpose of outdoor urban pedestrian lighting is to support the safety of pedestrians, particularly those who interact with adjacent vehicle traffic, while enhancing pedestrians’ perceptions of personal safety and security. A review of published literature, as well as the demonstration activities summarized, indicates the potential for bollard-level crosswalk lighting to enhance pedestrian visibility and to improve safety at crosswalks, particularly at locations where the presence of a crosswalk might not be expected by approaching drivers. Such locations include midblock crossings, roundabouts, and locations near schools and other public venues that might experience high levels of pedestrian traffic at sporadic or unexpected times.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN (up) 0361-1981 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1723
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