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Author Kostic, A.; Djokic, L.
Title Subjective impressions under LED and metal halide lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 46 Issue 3 Pages 293-307
Keywords lighting; outdoor lighting; subjective; LED; metal halide; *Safety; Belgrade
Abstract In order to compare subjective impressions created by LED and metal halide ambient lighting, a pilot project was conducted in a Belgrade park. All general requirements for an adequate comparison of subjective impressions were fulfilled. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire related to all aspects the researchers considered relevant for subjective evaluation of illuminated pedestrian paths in parks. It was concluded that the respondents, both those who had and those who did not have previous knowledge in the field of lighting, strongly preferred the use of metal halide lamps for the illumination of parks, which is in opposition to the statements of some LED manufacturers. It was also shown that light level and feelings of safety and comfort are evaluated as most important.
Address Faculty of Architecture, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
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ISSN (up) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 336
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Author Boyce, P.R.; Gutkowski, J.M.
Title The if, why and what of street lighting and street crime: A review Type Journal Article
Year 1995 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 27 Issue 2 Pages 103-112
Keywords Society; Safety
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ISSN (up) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1009
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Author Gibbons, R.; Terry, T.; Bhagavathula, R.; Meyer, J.; Lewis, A.
Title Applicability of mesopic factors to the driving task Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technology
Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 70-82
Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Planning
Abstract With the advent of light-emitting diode technology being applied to roadway lighting, the spectral power distribution of the light source is becoming much more important. In this experiment, the detection of pedestrians at five adaptation levels under three light sources, high pressure sodium and light emitting diodes of two colour temperatures was measured in realistic roadway scenarios. The results show that while the light source type was not significant, an increase in adaptation luminance increased the detection distance. As the offset of the object to the roadway increased, some spectral effects became more significant; however, this effect was not consistent across all angles of eccentricity. The conclusions from this work indicate that mesopic factors may not be applicable on high-speed roads.
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ISSN (up) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1382
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Author Fotios, S.; Gibbons, R.
Title Road lighting research for drivers and pedestrians: The basis of luminance and illuminance recommendations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 50 Issue 1 Pages 154-186
Keywords Security; Public Safety; Lighting; Review
Abstract This article discusses quantitative recommendations for road lighting as given in guidelines and standards, primarily, the amount of light. The discussion is framed according to the type of road user, the driver and the pedestrian, these being the user groups associated with major and minor roads, respectively. Presented first is a brief history of road lighting standards, from early to current versions, and, where known, the basis of these standards. Recommendations for the amount of light do not appear to be well-founded in robust empirical evidence, or at least do not tend to reveal the nature of any evidence. This suggests a need to reconsider recommended light levels, a need reinforced by recent developments in the science and technology of lighting and of lighting research. To enable improved recommendations, there is a need for further evidence of the effects of changes in lighting: This article therefore discusses the findings of investigations, which might be considered when developing new standards.
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ISSN (up) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1790
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Author Raynham, P.; Unwin, J.; Khazova, M.; Tolia, S.
Title The role of lighting in road traffic collisions Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 485-494
Keywords Public Safety
Abstract The paper reports a study that examines how to determine if a road traffic collision took place in daylight or in the dark. An innovative method was developed, based on solar altitude, to establish cut-off points of daylight and darkness determined from a study of daylight availability in England, Scotland and Wales. This approach provides a rigorous method to differentiate daytime and night-time collisions. The criteria were used in a study of the collisions reported in the STATS19 data set for the weeks either side of the clock changes that are necessary between Greenwich Mean Time and British Summer Time. By comparing periods with the same clock time either side of the time change, using the aforementioned method, it was possible to isolate collisions within the same time period that during one week occurred in darkness and in the other week in daylight. The initial finding was that there are 19.3% more collisions in the dark periods and there is an even greater increase (31.7%) in pedestrian injuries.
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ISSN (up) 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2991
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