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Author Fotios, S.; Yang, B.; Uttley, J. url  openurl
  Title Observing other pedestrians: Investigating the typical distance and duration of fixation Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technologying Res & Tech  
  Volume 47 Issue (up) 5 Pages 548-564  
  Keywords traffic safety; pedestrians; roadway lighting; visibility; light at night  
  Abstract After dark, road lighting should enhance the visual component of pedestrians’ interpersonal judgements such as evaluating the intent of others. Investigation of lighting effects requires better understanding of the nature of this task as expressed by the typical distance at which the judgement is made (and hence visual size) and the duration of observation, which in past studies have been arbitrary. Better understanding will help with interpretation of the significance of lighting characteristics such as illuminance and light spectrum. Conclusions of comfort distance in past studies are not consistent and hence this article presents new data determined using eye-tracking. We propose that further work on interpersonal judgements should examine the effects of lighting at a distance of 15 m with an observation duration of 500 ms.  
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  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 309  
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Author Monsere, C.M.; Fischer, E.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Safety effects of reducing freeway illumination for energy conservation Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Accident; Analysis and Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accid Anal Prev  
  Volume 40 Issue (up) 5 Pages 1773-1780  
  Keywords Lighting; Accidents, Traffic/*statistics & numerical data; *Automobile Driving; *Conservation of Energy Resources; Environment Design; Humans; *Lighting; Models, Statistical; Oregon; Safety; Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology  
  Abstract The addition of illumination where none was present is generally believed to have a positive effect on motor vehicle safety; reducing the frequency, as well as the severity of crashes. The operational cost of illumination, however, can make it a candidate for conservation during periods of high energy costs. In response to a forecasted energy shortage, the Oregon Department of Transportation selectively reduced illumination on interstate highways as part of an energy-saving effort. The reductions occurred at 44 interchanges and along 5.5 miles of interstate highway. This paper presents the results of a crash-based analysis of the changes in safety performance using an empirical-Bayes observational methodology. The study found an increase in reported crashes where the lineal lighting was reduced both in total crashes (28.95%, P=0.05) and injury night crashes (39.21%, P=0.07). Where full interchange lighting was reduced to partial lighting, a 2.46% increase (P=0.007) in total night crashes was observed. Injury night crashes, however, decreased by 12.16% (P<0.001) though day injury crashes also decreased at these locations. Unexpectedly, for interchanges where illumination was reduced from partial plus to partial, a 35.24% decrease (P<0.001) in total crashes and 39.98 (P<0.001) decrease in injury night crashes was found, though again, day crashes also decreased.  
  Address Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, USA. monsere@pdx.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:18760107 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 643  
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Author Fotios, S., Price, T url  openurl
  Title Road lighting and accidents: Why lighting is not the only answer Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Lighting Journal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 82 Issue (up) 5 Pages 22-26  
  Keywords Lighting; Public Safety  
  Abstract Tony Price and Steve Fotios point out that while road lighting can be a significant counter measure to accidents, and that higher levels might help, the presence of road lighting does not guarantee all accidents will be avoided.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1767  
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Author Marchant, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Do brighter, whiter street lights improve road safety? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Significance Abbreviated Journal Significance  
  Volume 16 Issue (up) 5 Pages 8-9  
  Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Statistics  
  Abstract Would a billion‐dollar investment in improved street lighting make Australian roads safer at night? Paul Marchant finds the evidence wanting  
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  ISSN 1740-9705 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2686  
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Author Doleac, J.L.; Sanders, N.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Under the Cover of Darkness: How Ambient Light Influences Criminal Activity Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Review of Economics and Statistics Abbreviated Journal Review of Economics and Statistics  
  Volume 97 Issue (up) 5 Pages 1093-1103  
  Keywords Public Safety; Crime  
  Abstract We exploit daylight saving time (DST) as an exogenous shock to daylight, using both the discontinuous nature of the policy and the 2007 extension of DST, to consider the impact of light on criminal activity.Regression discontinuity estimates show a 7% decrease in robberies following the shift to DST. As expected, effects are largest during the hours directly affected by the shift in daylight. We discuss our findings within the context of criminal decision making and labor supply, and estimate that the2007 DST extension resulted in $59 million in annual social cost savings from avoided robberies.  
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  ISSN 0034-6535 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2836  
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