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Author Ditton, J.; Nair, G.; Bannister, J.
Title The Cost-Effectiveness of Improved Street Lighting as a Crime Prevention Measure Type Journal Article
Year 1996 Publication The Lighting Journal Abbreviated Journal
Volume 61 Issue 4 Pages 251–256
Keywords (up) Society; Safety
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 1031
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Author Fotios, S.; Yang, B.; Uttley, J.
Title Observing other pedestrians: Investigating the typical distance and duration of fixation Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research and Technologying Res & Tech
Volume 47 Issue 5 Pages 548-564
Keywords (up) traffic safety; pedestrians; roadway lighting; visibility; light at night
Abstract After dark, road lighting should enhance the visual component of pedestrians’ interpersonal judgements such as evaluating the intent of others. Investigation of lighting effects requires better understanding of the nature of this task as expressed by the typical distance at which the judgement is made (and hence visual size) and the duration of observation, which in past studies have been arbitrary. Better understanding will help with interpretation of the significance of lighting characteristics such as illuminance and light spectrum. Conclusions of comfort distance in past studies are not consistent and hence this article presents new data determined using eye-tracking. We propose that further work on interpersonal judgements should examine the effects of lighting at a distance of 15 m with an observation duration of 500 ms.
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 309
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Author Saraiji, R,; Oommen, M.S.
Title Dominant contrast as a metric for the lighting of pedestrians Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Vision; Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract CIE Publication 115 and ANSI/IESNA Recommended Practice 8-00 both use vertical illuminance 1.5 m above the ground as a design criterion for the lighting of pedestrians. While vertical illuminance has the advantage of being easy to calculate and measure, visibility is based primarily on target contrast. A central question related to the visibility of pedestrians is whether drivers need to see the whole pedestrian or can they infer the presence of a pedestrian by recognizing any part of the pedestrian’s shape. The objective of this work was to first explore various pedestrian contrast profiles that could exist and then to find a simplified approach to characterize pedestrian night-time visibility. The problem was addressed through theoretical analyses and computer simulations. Pedestrian contrast was found to be bipolar and dynamic. From the contrast profiles, we developed the concept of dominant contrast, which is defined as the contrast of any part of the pedestrian that provides the highest visibility. Dominant contrast was examined as a metric for street lighting design and night time visibility for (a) an unlit street with car headlights, (b) a lit street without car headlights and (c) a lit street with car headlights. Dominant contrast was found to be a viable metric for street lighting design and night time visibility studies.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 854
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Author Skinner, N., & Bullough, J.
Title Influence of LED Spectral Characteristics on Glare Recovery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-0845 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords (up) Vision; Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract Headlight glare is a major concern of the driving public. In the past couple of years there have been concerns expressed about the use of light emitting diode (LED) lighting technologies and possible impacts LEDs may have on people, including circadian disruption, retinal hazards, and glare. Under typical use cases, vehicle headlight exposures are insufficient to cause circadian disruption or retinal damage, but can result in disability and discomfort glare, as well as glare recovery. In general, white LEDs used for illumination have greater short-wavelength content than halogen lamps used in many headlights, and short wavelengths have been implicated in visual discomfort from bright lights at night. Previous literature is inconsistent regarding whether the spectral (color) content of a glare source affects the amount of recovery time needed to see objects, following exposure to a bright light such as a vehicle headlight. Warm and cool white LEDs were used as glare sources in the present study. They were energized and exposed to study participants at one of two illuminances (low, high) for either 3 or 6 seconds, after which participants were asked to identify the orientation of a Landolt ring target located on a display screen behind the glare source. Identification times were unaffected by the spectral content of the LED, but were correlated with the “dosage” of light from the glare sources, defined as the product of illuminance and duration. Although cool white LEDs will tend to be judged as creating more discomfort than warm white LEDs, they do not result in longer glare recovery times under the range of conditions used in this study.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2299
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Author Wood, J.M.; Tyrrell, R.A.; Carberry, T.P.
Title Limitations in drivers' ability to recognize pedestrians at night Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Human Factors Abbreviated Journal Hum Factors
Volume 47 Issue 3 Pages 644-653
Keywords (up) Vision; Public Safety; Adult; Age Factors; Aged; *Automobile Driving/psychology; Clothing; *Darkness; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Reaction Time; Task Performance and Analysis; Visual Perception
Abstract This study quantified drivers' ability to recognize pedestrians at night. Ten young and 10 older participants drove around a closed road circuit and responded when they first recognized a pedestrian. Four pedestrian clothing and two beam conditions were tested. Results demonstrate that driver age, clothing configuration, headlamp beam, and glare all significantly affect performance. Drivers recognized only 5% of pedestrians in the most challenging condition (low beams, black clothing, glare), whereas drivers recognized 100% of the pedestrians who wore retroreflective clothing configured to depict biological motion (no glare). In the absence of glare, mean recognition distances varied from 0.0 m (older drivers, low beam, black clothing) to 220 m (722 feet; younger drivers, high beam, retroreflective biomotion). These data provide new motivation to minimize interactions between vehicular and pedestrian traffic at night and suggest garment designs to maximize pedestrian conspicuity when these interactions are unavoidable.
Address Center for Eye Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. j.wood@qut.edu.au
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2804
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