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Author Skinner, N., & Bullough, J.
Title Influence of LED Spectral Characteristics on Glare Recovery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-0845 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Vision; Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract Headlight glare is a major concern of the driving public. In the past couple of years there have been concerns expressed about the use of light emitting diode (LED) lighting technologies and possible impacts LEDs may have on people, including circadian disruption, retinal hazards, and glare. Under typical use cases, vehicle headlight exposures are insufficient to cause circadian disruption or retinal damage, but can result in disability and discomfort glare, as well as glare recovery. In general, white LEDs used for illumination have greater short-wavelength content than halogen lamps used in many headlights, and short wavelengths have been implicated in visual discomfort from bright lights at night. Previous literature is inconsistent regarding whether the spectral (color) content of a glare source affects the amount of recovery time needed to see objects, following exposure to a bright light such as a vehicle headlight. Warm and cool white LEDs were used as glare sources in the present study. They were energized and exposed to study participants at one of two illuminances (low, high) for either 3 or 6 seconds, after which participants were asked to identify the orientation of a Landolt ring target located on a display screen behind the glare source. Identification times were unaffected by the spectral content of the LED, but were correlated with the “dosage” of light from the glare sources, defined as the product of illuminance and duration. Although cool white LEDs will tend to be judged as creating more discomfort than warm white LEDs, they do not result in longer glare recovery times under the range of conditions used in this study.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2299
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Author Neale, W., Marr, J., McKelvey, N., & Kuzel, M.
Title Nighttime Visibility in Varying Moonlight Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-1005 Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Moonlight; Vision
Abstract When the visibility of an object or person in the roadway from a driver’s perspective is an issue, the potential effect of moonlight is sometimes questioned. To assess this potential effect, methods typically used to quantify visibility were performed during conditions with no moon and with a full moon. In the full moon condition, measurements were collected from initial moon rise until the moon reached peak azimuth. Baseline ambient light measurements of illumination at the test surface were measured in both no moon and full moon scenarios. Additionally, a vehicle with activated low beam headlamps was positioned in the testing area and the change in illumination at two locations forward of the vehicle was recorded at thirty-minute intervals as the moon rose to the highest position in the sky. Also, two separate luminance readings were recorded during the test intervals, one location 75 feet in front and to the left of the vehicle, and another 150 feet forward of the vehicle. These luminance readings yielding the change in reflected light attributable to the moon. In addition to the quantitative measurement of light contributed by the moon, documentation to the change in visibility of objects and pedestrians located on the roadway were documented through photographs. Calibrated nighttime photographs were taken from the driver’s perspective inside the vehicle with low beam headlamps activated. The photographs were analyzed after testing to determine how the light intensity of the pixels in the photographs changed at each thirty-minute interval due to the additional light contribution from the moon. The results of this testing indicate that the quantifiable change in visibility distance attributable to added moonlight was negligible, and in real-world driving situations, the effect of additional illumination from a full moon would be unlikely to affect the detection of an object or pedestrian in or near the travel lane of the roadway.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2355
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Author Edison, T.A.
Title The dangers of electric lighting Type Journal Article
Year 1889 Publication The North American Review Abbreviated Journal
Volume 149 Issue 396 Pages 625-634
Keywords Public Safety
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2377
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Author Laze, K.
Title Assessing Public Perceptions about Road Lighting in five Neighborhoods of Tirana, Albania Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Psychology; Roadway lighting; Albania; Europe
Abstract Lighting is essential for sight, human health and well-being, emerging the need for assessing exterior lighting to better understand how far public is satisfied about exterior lighting. Exterior lighting was assessed in five major roads of the capital city of Tirana, Albania, in November 2017. Security, obstacle detection and visibility were evaluated using questionnaires for road lighting. The approximately 87 and 60 percent of respondents, respectively, were not able to detect a pavement obstacle after-dark and to distinguish a

familiar face at a distance of 5 m and 10 m along roads. Road lighting after-dark was unsatisfactory to 60 percent of respondents. These findings identified road lighting could be inadequate for users, requiring further investigation and new data collection of road lighting in neighborhoods of Tirana.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2651
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Author Marchant, P.
Title Do brighter, whiter street lights improve road safety? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Significance Abbreviated Journal Significance
Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages 8-9
Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Statistics
Abstract Would a billion‐dollar investment in improved street lighting make Australian roads safer at night? Paul Marchant finds the evidence wanting
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ISSN 1740-9705 ISBN Medium
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2686
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