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Author Stone, T.; Santoni de Sio, F.; Vermaas, P.E.
Title Driving in the Dark: Designing Autonomous Vehicles for Reducing Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science and Engineering Ethics Abbreviated Journal Sci Eng Ethics
Volume (down) Issue Pages 1-17
Keywords Society; Darkness; Planning; Public Safety; Design for values
Abstract This paper proposes that autonomous vehicles should be designed to reduce light pollution. In support of this specific proposal, a moral assessment of autonomous vehicles more comprehensive than the dilemmatic life-and-death questions of trolley problem-style situations is presented. The paper therefore consists of two interrelated arguments. The first is that autonomous vehicles are currently still a technology in development, and not one that has acquired its definitive shape, meaning the design of both the vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure is open-ended. Design for values is utilized to articulate a path forward, by which engineering ethics should strive to incorporate values into a technology during its development phase. Second, it is argued that nighttime lighting-a critical supporting infrastructure-should be a prima facie consideration for autonomous vehicles during their development phase. It is shown that a reduction in light pollution, and more boldly a better balance of lighting and darkness, can be achieved via the design of future autonomous vehicles. Two case studies are examined (parking lots and highways) through which autonomous vehicles may be designed for “driving in the dark.” Nighttime lighting issues are thus inserted into a broader ethics of autonomous vehicles, while simultaneously introducing questions of autonomous vehicles into debates about light pollution.
Address Department Ethics/Philosophy of Technology, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlands
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1353-3452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30903370 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2277
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Author Skinner, N., & Bullough, J.
Title Influence of LED Spectral Characteristics on Glare Recovery Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-0845 Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) Issue Pages
Keywords Vision; Lighting; Public Safety
Abstract Headlight glare is a major concern of the driving public. In the past couple of years there have been concerns expressed about the use of light emitting diode (LED) lighting technologies and possible impacts LEDs may have on people, including circadian disruption, retinal hazards, and glare. Under typical use cases, vehicle headlight exposures are insufficient to cause circadian disruption or retinal damage, but can result in disability and discomfort glare, as well as glare recovery. In general, white LEDs used for illumination have greater short-wavelength content than halogen lamps used in many headlights, and short wavelengths have been implicated in visual discomfort from bright lights at night. Previous literature is inconsistent regarding whether the spectral (color) content of a glare source affects the amount of recovery time needed to see objects, following exposure to a bright light such as a vehicle headlight. Warm and cool white LEDs were used as glare sources in the present study. They were energized and exposed to study participants at one of two illuminances (low, high) for either 3 or 6 seconds, after which participants were asked to identify the orientation of a Landolt ring target located on a display screen behind the glare source. Identification times were unaffected by the spectral content of the LED, but were correlated with the “dosage” of light from the glare sources, defined as the product of illuminance and duration. Although cool white LEDs will tend to be judged as creating more discomfort than warm white LEDs, they do not result in longer glare recovery times under the range of conditions used in this study.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2299
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Author Neale, W., Marr, J., McKelvey, N., & Kuzel, M.
Title Nighttime Visibility in Varying Moonlight Conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication SAE Technical Paper 2019-01-1005 Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Moonlight; Vision
Abstract When the visibility of an object or person in the roadway from a driver’s perspective is an issue, the potential effect of moonlight is sometimes questioned. To assess this potential effect, methods typically used to quantify visibility were performed during conditions with no moon and with a full moon. In the full moon condition, measurements were collected from initial moon rise until the moon reached peak azimuth. Baseline ambient light measurements of illumination at the test surface were measured in both no moon and full moon scenarios. Additionally, a vehicle with activated low beam headlamps was positioned in the testing area and the change in illumination at two locations forward of the vehicle was recorded at thirty-minute intervals as the moon rose to the highest position in the sky. Also, two separate luminance readings were recorded during the test intervals, one location 75 feet in front and to the left of the vehicle, and another 150 feet forward of the vehicle. These luminance readings yielding the change in reflected light attributable to the moon. In addition to the quantitative measurement of light contributed by the moon, documentation to the change in visibility of objects and pedestrians located on the roadway were documented through photographs. Calibrated nighttime photographs were taken from the driver’s perspective inside the vehicle with low beam headlamps activated. The photographs were analyzed after testing to determine how the light intensity of the pixels in the photographs changed at each thirty-minute interval due to the additional light contribution from the moon. The results of this testing indicate that the quantifiable change in visibility distance attributable to added moonlight was negligible, and in real-world driving situations, the effect of additional illumination from a full moon would be unlikely to affect the detection of an object or pedestrian in or near the travel lane of the roadway.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2355
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Author Laze, K.
Title Assessing Public Perceptions about Road Lighting in five Neighborhoods of Tirana, Albania Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Psychology; Roadway lighting; Albania; Europe
Abstract Lighting is essential for sight, human health and well-being, emerging the need for assessing exterior lighting to better understand how far public is satisfied about exterior lighting. Exterior lighting was assessed in five major roads of the capital city of Tirana, Albania, in November 2017. Security, obstacle detection and visibility were evaluated using questionnaires for road lighting. The approximately 87 and 60 percent of respondents, respectively, were not able to detect a pavement obstacle after-dark and to distinguish a

familiar face at a distance of 5 m and 10 m along roads. Road lighting after-dark was unsatisfactory to 60 percent of respondents. These findings identified road lighting could be inadequate for users, requiring further investigation and new data collection of road lighting in neighborhoods of Tirana.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2651
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Author DeCoursey, W., Braun, D., & Oza, J.
Title Pedestrian Lighting, Acceptable Levels of Light: A Pilot Project Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Institute for Public Administration Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) Issue Pages
Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Security
Abstract This pilot project study was intended to demonstrate that assessing the adequacy of an area’s pedestrian lighting need not be an expensive, time-consuming, or overly complicated process. Though the discussion of methods of pedestrian lighting can become quite technical and involved, as demonstrated in a 2016 IPA report on the topic, “Delaware Transportation Lighting Inventory & Assessment” (http://www.ipa.udel.edu/publications/transportationlighting-2016.pdf), simply observing and recording light levels in a given study area is quite straightforward.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2710
Permanent link to this record