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Author (up) Boivin, D.B.; Boudreau, P.; Tremblay, G.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Phototherapy and orange-tinted goggles for night-shift adaptation of police officers on patrol Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 629-640  
  Keywords Human Health; Adaptation, Physiological/*physiology; Adult; Attention/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Color; Darkness; *Eye Protective Devices/adverse effects; Female; Humans; Light; Male; Melatonin/analogs & derivatives/metabolism/urine; Phototherapy/*adverse effects; *Police; Psychomotor Performance/*physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology; Work Schedule Tolerance/*physiology  
  Abstract The aim of the present combined field and laboratory study was to assess circadian entrainment in two groups of police officers working seven consecutive 8/8.5-h night shifts as part of a rotating schedule. Eight full-time police officers on patrol (mean age +/- SD: 29.8 +/- 6.5 yrs) were provided an intervention consisting of intermittent exposure to wide-spectrum bright light at night, orange-tinted goggles at sunrise, and maintenance of a regular sleep/darkness episode in the day. Orange-tinted goggles have been shown to block the melatonin-suppressing effect of light significantly more than neutral gray density goggles. Nine control group police officers (mean age +/- SD: 30.3 +/- 4.1 yrs) working the same schedule were enrolled. Police officers were studied before, after (in the laboratory), and during (ambulatory) a series of seven consecutive nights. Urine samples were collected at wake time and bedtime throughout the week of night work and during laboratory visits (1 x /3 h) preceding and following the work week to measure urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (UaMT6s) excretion rate. Subjective alertness was assessed at the start, middle, and end of night shifts. A 10-min psychomotor vigilance task was performed at the start and end of each shift. Both laboratory visits consisted of two 8-h sleep episodes based on the prior schedule. Saliva samples were collected 2 x /h during waking episodes to assay their melatonin content. Subjective alertness (3 x /h) and performance (1 x /2 h) were assessed during wake periods in the laboratory. A mixed linear model was used to analyze the progression of UaMt6s excreted during daytime sleep episodes at home, as well as psychomotor performance and subjective alertness during night shifts. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (factors: laboratory visit and group) were used to compare peak salivary melatonin and UaMT6s excretion rate in the laboratory. In both groups of police officers, the excretion rate of UaMT6s at home was higher during daytime sleep episodes at the end compared to the start of the work week (p < .001). This rate increased significantly more in the intervention than control group (p = .032). A significant phase delay of salivary melatonin was observed in both groups at the end of study (p = .009), although no significant between-group difference was reached. Reaction speed dropped, and subjective alertness decreased throughout the night shift in both groups (p < .001). Reaction speed decreased throughout the work week in the control group (p </= .021), whereas no difference was observed in the intervention group. Median reaction time was increased as of the 5th and 6th nights compared to the 2nd night in controls (p </= .003), whereas it remained stable in the intervention group. These observations indicate better physiological adaptation in the intervention group compared to the controls.  
  Address Centre for Study and Treatment of Circadian Rhythms , Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. diane.boivin@douglas.mcgill.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22621360 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 509  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lowden, A.; Akerstedt, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 29 Issue 5 Pages 641-649  
  Keywords Adaptation, Physiological; Adult; *Circadian Rhythm; Darkness/adverse effects; *Environment, Controlled; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/metabolism; Middle Aged; Photic Stimulation; Pilot Projects; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/*physiology; *Wakefulness; *Work Schedule Tolerance  
  Abstract The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group x light x time, p < .01). Time of waking was delayed in the light condition after the 3rd night shift (group x light, p < .05), but the amount of wake time during the sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p < .05), also showing a tendency to affect sleep efficiency (p < .10). Effects on circadian phase were difficult to establish given the small sample size and infrequent sampling of saliva melatonin. Nonetheless, it seems that appropriate dynamic light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness, sleep, and better adaptation to quickly rotating shiftwork.  
  Address Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. arne.lowden@stress.su.se  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22621361 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 148  
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Author (up) Revell, V.L.; Molina, T.A.; Eastman, C.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication The Journal of Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol  
  Volume 590 Issue Pt 19 Pages 4859-4868  
  Keywords Adolescent; Adult; Circadian Clocks/physiology/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; *Light; Male; Melatonin/analysis/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Young Adult; blue light  
  Abstract Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC.We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 x 6.6 cm at approximately 50 cm, approximately 200 muW cm(-2), approximately 185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world.  
  Address University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-3751 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22753544; PMCID:PMC3487041 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 345  
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Author (up) Thorn, L.; Hucklebridge, F.; Esgate, A.; Evans, P.; Clow, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of dawn simulation on the cortisol response to awakening in healthy participants Type Journal Article
  Year 2004 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology  
  Volume 29 Issue 7 Pages 925-930  
  Keywords Human Health; Adult; Affect/*physiology/radiation effects; Arousal/*physiology/radiation effects; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Humans; Hydrocortisone/analysis/*physiology/radiation effects; *Light; Male; Middle Aged; Reference Values; Saliva/chemistry; Wakefulness/*physiology/radiation effects  
  Abstract Bright light exposure after awakening has been shown to elevate cortisol levels in healthy participants. The present study examined the effect of dawn simulation (a treatment for seasonal affective disorder) on the cortisol response to awakening and mood. Twelve healthy participants were supplied with a dawn simulator (The Natural Alarm Clock, Outside In, Cambridge Ltd), a bedside light that increases in intensity prior to awakening to approximately 250 lux over 30 mins when an audible alarm sounds. A counterbalanced study was performed on 4 consecutive normal weekdays, two of which were control days (no dawn simulation) and two experimental (dawn simulation). Saliva samples were taken immediately on awakening then at 15, 30 and 45 minutes post awakening on all 4 study-days. Total cortisol production during the first 45 mins after awakening was found to be significantly higher in the experimental condition than in the control condition. Participants also reported greater arousal in the experimental condition and there was a trend for an association between increased arousal and increased cortisol secretory activity under dawn simulation. This study provides supportive evidence for the role of light and the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the awakening cortisol response.  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of Westminster, 309 Regent Street, London W1R 8AL, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:15177708 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 824  
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Author (up) Wilhelm, I.; Born, J.; Kudielka, B.M.; Schlotz, W.; Wust, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Is the cortisol awakening rise a response to awakening? Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Psychoneuroendocrinology Abbreviated Journal Psychoneuroendocrinology  
  Volume 32 Issue 4 Pages 358-366  
  Keywords Human Health; Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood; Adult; Arousal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm; Humans; Hydrocortisone/blood/*metabolism; Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/physiology; Male; Pituitary-Adrenal System/physiology; Saliva/chemistry; Sleep/physiology  
  Abstract A distinct rise in cortisol levels that occurs after morning awakening is increasingly used as an indicator of adrenocortical activity which is associated with different pathologies. Although it was previously assumed that the transition from sleep to wake is essential for the occurrence of the cortisol morning rise, this has never been tested. Here, we examined 16 healthy young men (20-33 yrs) between 2300 and 0800 h under sleep laboratory conditions. Serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) as well as salivary cortisol levels (after subjects were woken up at 0700 h) were repeatedly assessed. In a supplementary study condition, salivary cortisol levels in the first hour after awakening were measured at the subjects' home on two consecutive days. Comparison of pre- and post awakening measurements revealed significantly steeper increases in cortisol and ACTH after awakening. The rise in cortisol upon awakening under laboratory conditions did not significantly differ from that observed at home. We conclude that the cortisol increase after awakening is a response to morning awakening that is distinct from the circadian rise in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity in the morning hours. Although the cortisol awakening response is modulated by circadian influences, it primarily reflects phasic psychophysiological processes specific to the sleep-wake transition.  
  Address Department of Psychobiology, University of Trier, Johanniterufer 15, 54290 Trier, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0306-4530 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17408865 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 834  
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