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Author Wanvik, P.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of road lighting on motorways Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication (up) Traffic Injury Prevention Abbreviated Journal Traffic Inj Prev  
  Volume 10 Issue 3 Pages 279-289  
  Keywords Lighting; Public Safety; Security  
  Abstract OBJECTIVES: The study has three objectives. The first is to investigate how the effect of road lighting on motorway accidents varies with different weather and road surface conditions. The second is to evaluate the future benefit of road lighting as a safety measure on motorways. The third is to evaluate the need for further research in the field of motorway lighting. METHOD: This article presents a cross-sectional study of the effects of road lighting on motorways mainly in The Netherlands. The main source of data is a Dutch database of accidents covering the period 1987-2006, but British and Swedish data are also used. RESULTS: The effect of road lighting on motorways is found to be greater in The Netherlands than in Great Britain or Sweden. Reasons for this are not known. Effects are found to vary according to background characteristics and are lesser during precipitation than during fine weather and on wet road surfaces than on dry surfaces. No effect of road lighting is found during fog. Collision with light poles constitutes a large number of accidents on lit motorways and reduces the safety effect of road lighting. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of road lighting on injury accidents during darkness is found to be very high (-49%) on Dutch motorways. However, the effect seems to vary between countries. Collisions with light poles reduce the effect of road lighting. Road lighting will probably be an effective safety measures on motorways for many years. In the long term, however, the benefit of road lighting will probably be reduced along with the implementation of new vehicle and road technology. Modern technology permits a continuous adaptation of luminance levels to optimize the effect of road lighting on safety while at the same time minimizing energy consumption. However, more detailed knowledge concerning the effects of road lighting at different lighting levels is needed in order to use this technology effectively. Alternative or additional measures like LED guide lights and light road surfaces also need to be evaluated.  
  Address Norwegian Public Roads Administration, Region South, Serviceboks 723, Arendal, Norway. per.wanvik@vegvesen.no  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1538-9588 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19452370 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1788  
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Author Struyf P.; Enhus E.; Bauwens T.; Melgaço L. url  openurl
  Title Literature study: The effects of reduced public lighting on crime, fear of crime, and road safety Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication (up) west-vlaanderen Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Safety; Security; Psychology; Review  
  Abstract 1. Introduction

1.1 Stating the problem: security versus climate and economic challenges

Public street lighting as a public service is often taken for granted. However, its impact on the nocturnal perception of public space should not be underestimated. It encourages people to get out, feel safe, and be safe. Indeed, Welsh and Farrington suggest that public lighting enhances social control, cohesion, and a feeling of community pride (Welsh & Farrington, 2008b). According to (Williams, 2008), this is due to the special meaning attached to the darkness of night in society. It is associated with changes in social norms and values, transgression, the release of social control, feasting, drinking, and pleasure. Meanwhile, the darkness of night generates unpredictability, uncertainty and, therefore, fear. Illuminating the night chases away these feelings; people feel reassured and safer (Schivelbusch, 1995).
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number UP @ altintas1 @ Serial 3206  
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Author Marchant, Paul url  openurl
  Title Bad Science: comments on the paper ‘Quantifying the impact of road lighting on road safety — a New zealand Study’ by Jackett & Frith (2013). Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication (up) World Transport Policy and Practice Abbreviated Journal World Transp Policy & Practice  
  Volume 26 Issue 2 Pages 10-20  
  Keywords Safety; Security; Commentary; Statistics; Collisions  
  Abstract The paper of Jackett & Frith (2013), which purports to show considerable gains for road safety with increasing road luminance, is seriously flawed. It asserts that increasing the luminance on roads causes improvements in road safety. Its cross-sectional design fails to rule out major potential confounders. using a longitudinal design would be a far superior approach. The paper exhibits poor statistical practice. The selection process for the relatively small sample of urban roads is unclear and the post hoc processing of the data is questionable. The analysis is seriously deficient, as variables which indicate detrimental effects of increased road lighting are removed from the modelling without proper justification and other variables are not included in the first analysis yet appear in the subsequent cosmetic analyses. The latter give an illusion of false certainty. The data collected, which would allow checking, is not published. The practice of the journal in which the paper appeared is seriously deficient in not allowing the publication of critical responses. although being used to promote increased road lighting, the paper’s claim disagrees with results from better quality research  
  Address 221 Leighton Hall, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, United Kingdom LS1 3HE; p.marchant(at)leedsbeckett.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher World Transport Policy and Practice Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1352-7614 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes A corrected appendix to this paper is available on page 50 of: http://worldtransportjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/26.3-final.pdf. Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2862  
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